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Colli was directed to apply to him completely humbled, who had long for that purpose, and propoļed a been considered as the most secure suspension of arms, while the peace of any, by his position, against the was negociating. But he refused inroads of the French: his predeto suspend his operations, unless the cessors, though frequently hard prelking delivered two strong towns led by them, had never been reinto his hands, as pledges of the duced to such extremities, and nes fincerity of his intentions, and im- ver experienced such disgrace. By mediately dispatched commissioners this treaty he was despoiled of all to Paris.

power and consequence; and though The king's fituation was so criti. he retained the title of the king, cal, that he was obliged to comply he remained no more than the nowith this requisition, and the French minal fovereign of his dominions. were put in possession of Cava, The reduction of the king of Coni, and Tortona. The Auftrians, Sardinia was an event that changed thus deprived of their ally, were at once the whole face of Italy. obliged to fall back on the Milanese. That prince was no longer master In their march they attempted to of the barriers that nature has fixed fieze the town of Alessandria, be- between that country and France, longing to the king of Sardinia, and from which he derived his prinbut the commandant prevented the cipal importance. They were now execution of this design, and Bcau- in the hands of the French, and the lieu hastened to cross the Po, in or- Italian powers, deprived of this der to cover himself and the country rampart of their dominior; faw to the north of that river.

themselves at the mercy of a people, In the mean time, negociations for who had, for many centuries, enpeace were carried on at Paris, be- deavoured to obtain a footing atween the king of Sardinia and the mong them, with the manifest design French republic, which impcled of subjecting them to their influence. severe conditions on this unfortunate These astonishing fuccesses could prince. He was constrained to not fail to inspire the French aryield up Savoy, the patrimony of mies, that had obtained them, with his ancestors for many ages, toge- the highest degree of exultation : ther with the city and territory of nor did their commander forget to Nice, and a tract of land, which the improve the sentiments of self apconquerors entitled the Department plause and confidence, manifefted by of the Maritime Alps. A new ar- them, into that disposition of mind rangement was made of the fron, which would lead them on to thole tiers on each side, highly advantage- farther exploits he had in contemous to France. He consented to plation. He issued an address to ftop and put an end to all prosecu- them on the twenty-sixth of April, tions againft any of his subjects for three days after the application for their political opinions, to withdraw peace from the Sardinian monarch, himself from the coalition, and to wherein lie recapitulated, in a truly apologise for his conduct towards the classical and energetic style, the republic. Such were the principal glory they had acquired, and repreterms of the treaty.

lented that which lay still before In this manner was the prince them. I

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unexpected attack, so far discom- with great courage, the Piedmontefe posed them, that they were thrown' withdrew in the night of the fix, into disorder, and compelled to teenth, abandoning Cava, which furabandon their post, after having rendered to the French. After some thrice endeavoured to retake it. retrograde motions, wherein they

More than half of the day had were closely prefled by the French, been spent in thele fruitless attempts, who met however with some checks,

when Buonaparte, anxious to reco- a general engageinent took place near ver a post, without which, the ad- Mondovi on the twenty-second. vantages gained by his two victories, General Colli, who commanded would have been frustrated, imme- the Piedmontese, had drawn up his diately gave orders for a large body army to great advantage; his centre to form in front of the enemy, and being covered by a strong redoubt, occupy their attention, while ano- which was resolutely defended for ther charged them on their left, a long time against all the efforts posted at Dego. The intrepidity of the French, who lost numbers in with which the French generals and its attack. It was carried at length officers headed their men, decided after repeated allaults: upon which the fate of the day. After a vigor- general Colli thought it prudent. ous defence, the Austrians were in to retreat. His loss amounted to their turn obliged to give ground, and about twelve hundred men, of whom leave the field to the French, with a thousand were taken. Of these, the loss of near two thousand men, three were generals, and four coloof wlwm, about fifteen hundred nels. One general was Nain, and were made prisoners : on the side eleven standards fell into the hands of the French, numbers also fell, of the French, who loft also one of and among these general Caufla, their generals, and a confiderable one of their best officers.

number of men. Thus, in the space of five days, no The Piedmontese army, after its less than three battles were fought, defeat, crosled the river Stura, and in every one of which the French took a strong position between Coni were victorious. The Austrian and and Cherasco. Here it was attackPiedmontefe armies had, in the course ed, on the 25th, by the French, who of these engagements, been separated compelled general Colli to retire from each other: which enabled Buo- from the post he occupied at Fellano. naparte to effect a junction with a They made themselves masters of considerable body of his army, be- Cherasco, where they took a quanfore which the Piedmontese divifion tity of cannon and large magazines, had retired, not daring to oppose it and the Piedmontese withdrew to in combination with the corps under Carignano, in order to be nearer general Augereau who had joined to Turin, for its protection against it. After dislodging the Piedmontefe the French army, which was now from their redoubts, at Montezimo, advanced to within nine leagues of this officer followed them to their that city. camp before the town of Cava. It The defeat of his army, at Monwas strongly fortified, but Augereau dovi, had already determined the attacked it with such vigour, that, king of Sardinia to make overtures after defending it the whole day of peace to Buonaparte. General

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nonade was kept up, on both fides, would have been much greater. It during great part of the day. was owing to the approach of night

But the French general was con- that the French defifted from the vinced, that unless he succeeded pursuit. Favoured by darkness, in effecting a paffage over the bridge, Beaulieu withdrew from the field his failure would be construed into of battle, after lofing upwards of a defeat, and the reputation of the two thousand men, killed, woundFrench arms would fufter in the opi- ed, and taken, and twenty pieces nion of the public. Full of this of cannon. The loss of the French idea, which was certainly well was considerable: the crossing of founded, he determined to try every the bridge alone coft them near a effort, and to encounter every per- thousand of their boldest men, who fonal risk, in order to carry a point were destroyed by the batteries on which so much appeared at issue. pointed on it from the Austrian side Forming together the selecteft bo- of the river. dies of his army, he led them in

This defeat of the Imperial army person to the aitack of the bridge, appeared fo decisive to marshal in the midst of a most tremendous Beaulieu that lie durft not venture fire. The intrepidity he displayed to stop the progress of the victors was necessary to confirm the cou- towards Milan. Colleaing the tage of his men, whom the great- wrecks of his army, he made a ness of the danger, seemed to ftag. speedy retreat towards Mantua, purger: but his presence, and that of fued by a large body of the French all the chief officers in the French who, in their way, seized on Pizarmy, animated the soldiers to such zighitona and Cremona, two places a degree, that they rushed forward of note. The main body under with an impetuosity which nothing Buonaparte proceeded to Milan, afwas able to withstand. They croíl- ter taking Pavia, where all the Auf ed the bridge and affailed the whole trian magazines fell into the hands line of the Austrian artillery, which of the French. was instantly broken. They fell Buonaparte entered Milan the fifa with equal fury on the troops that teenth of May, five days after the advanced to charge them, who battle of Lodi, which, conformawere thrown into disorder, and put bly to his opinion and that of his to flight on every fide. The victo- rival, Beaulieu, proved wholly dety was complete. Had it not been cifive of the fate of Lombardy. for the exceflive fatigue undergone Here the French general thought it by the French, a great proportion neceflary to allow his people some of whom had marched ten leagues days of repose, after the unceafing that day to join the army, the loss toils of a whole month; marked by of the imperialists though great uninterrupted victories.

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He was high in the esteem of Buona- and whose thirst of fame would parte, who had formed the greatest thereby be gratified to the utmost expectations from him, and grie- extent of his wishes. vousy lamented his fall.

Between him and that capital of The duke of Parma, in whose Austrian Italy lay the remains of fight, as it were, the French had the Imperial forces, determined to crossed the Po, and defeated the risk another battle for its preservaAustrians twice in one day, did not tion. They were posted on the dare to prolong the contest on his other side of the Adda, over which part, with so irresistable a foe. He stood a long bridge, which Beaulieu requested an armistice from Buona- had intended to break down, but was parte, and obtained it on condition prevented from doing by the quick of paying a large contribution in approach of the French general. It money, horses, and provisions, of was protected, however, by fo nudelivering into the poffeffion of the merous an artillery, that the Auri French, twenty capital paintings trians did not imagine the French to be chosen by them, and of send- would be able to force a pallage ing without delay commissaries to

over it. Paris, to conclude a peace with the On the tenth of May, the French republic: on these terms the duke army arrived in sight of this bridge, procured a neutrality for his domis before which ftood the town of nions, which was concluded on the Lodi, filled with the Imperial troops, ninth of May.

which were also posted in every The uninterrupted successes of place around it in the most advanthe French had now ftruck their tageous order of battle that the enemies with universal consterna- situation of the town and its envi.. tion. Beaulieu himself, though an rons would admit. Beaulieu had, expert and intrepid warrior, thought on this occafion, displayed uncomit more prudent to act on the de- mon skill, conscious that, on the fensive, than to attack them with issue of this day, the fate of Aula troops continually defeated The tria in Italy wholely depended, and bravery of the Austrians, though un- that, were he defeated, all future

, deniable, had not been proof against resistance would be vain. their impetuous valour and unyield- The battle began at nine in the ing enthusiasm. They seemed to morning. The approaches to Lodi have reversed the character formerly were vigovroully attacked by the attributed to them, of impatience French, who, after an obstinate difand unsteadiness, and to have af- pute, drove the Austrians into that sumed that of firmness and con- town; where a refolute fight ensued: ftancy.

but the French had again the advanTheir exploits had now opened tage, and forced them to retreat. to them the road to Milan, the cap- across the bridge to their main body, ture of which would give them the which was drawn up in order of possession of Lombardy, and effect battle, with formidable batteries on the expulsion of the A usirians from their right and left to guard the Italy. This was the project of passage of the bridge. A battery Buonaparte, whose glory would be was planted on the opposite fide completed by fuch an'atchievement; by the French, and a violent can

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nonade was kept up, on both fides, would have been much greater. It during great part of the day. was owing to the approach of night

But the French general was con that the French defifted from the vinced, that unless he succeeded pursuit. Favoured by darkness, in effecting a passage over the bridge, Beaulieu withdrew from the field his failure would be construed into of battle, after losing upwards of a defeat, and the reputation of the two thousand men, killed, woundFrench arms would fufier in the opi- ed, and taken, and twenty pieces nion of the public. Full of this of cannon. The loss of the French idea, which was certainly well was considerable: the crossing of founded, he determined to try every the bridge alone cost them near a effort, and to encounter every per- thousand of their boldest men, who fonal risk, in order to carry a point were destroyed by the batteries on which so much appeared at issue. pointed on it from the Austrian side Forming together the selecteft bo- of the river. dies of his army, he led them in This defeat of the Imperial army person to the attack of the bridge, appeared fo decisive to marshal in the midst of a most tremendous Beaulieu that he durft not venture fire. The intrepidity he displayed to stop the progress of the victors was necessary to confirm the cou- towards Milan. Collecting the tage of his men, whom the great wrecks of his army, he made a ness of the danger, seemed to stag- speedy retreat towards Mantua, purger: but his presence, and that of fued by a large body of the French all the chief officers in the French who, in their way, seized on Pizarmy, animated the soldiers to such zighitona and Cremona, two places a degree, that they rufhed forward of note. The main body under with an impetuotity which nothing Buonaparte proceeded to Milan, afwas able to withstand. They crofl- ter taking Pavia, where all the Aused the bridge and assailed the whole trian magazines fell into the hands line of the Austrian artillery, which of the French. was instantly broken. They fell Buonaparte entered Milan the fif with equal fury on the troops that teenth of May, five days after the advanced to charge them, who battle of Lodi, which, conformawere thrown into disorder, and put bly to his opinion and that of his to flight on every fide. The victo- rival, Beaulieu, proved wholly de ty was complete. Had it not been cisive of the fate of Lombardy. for the excessive fatigue undergone Here the French general thought it by the French, a great proportion necessary to allow his people some of whom had marched ten leagues dàys of repose, after the unceafing that day to join the army, the loss toils of a whole month, marked by of the iinperialists though great uninterrupted vi&ories.

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