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The Chief of the Coast Artillery was given the rank, pay, and allowances of a brigadier general by a provision in sec. 5, act of Jan. 25, 1907 (34 Stat. 861), which provision was superseded by a provision in sec. 20, act of June 3, 1916 139 Stat. 180), which provided that the Chief of the Coast Artillery should have the rank of a brigadier general, but omitted the provision as to his pay and allowances, vision was in turn superseded by a provision in sec. 1, act of July 6, 1916, 2347, post, which provided that the Chief of Coast Artillery sh uld have the rank, pay, and allowances of a major general. (For general provision under which he would have been so entitled, see sec. 3, act of Oct. 6, 1917, post, 2342.)

Provisions relating to the appointment to fill vacancies in the office of the Chief of Coast Artillery, etc., are contained in sec. 2, act of Jan. 25, 1907, post, 2344.

The Coast Artillery Corps is designated as a combatant arm or of the line of the Army, by sec. 2 of said act of June 4, 1920, ante, 2118.

Sec. 20, act of June 3, 1916, as originally enacted, prescribed the specific number in each commissioned and noncommissioned grade and superseded sec. 5, act of Jan. 25, 1907 (34 Stat. 861), which was equally specific. A provision in the latter section for the organization of the Coast Artillery Corps into 170 companies not being repeated in later enactments, was treated as repealed. (See G. 0. 31 and 50, War Dept., 1916, and 98, War Dept., 1917).

Previous provisions prescribing the composition of the Artillery Corps were contained in sec. 6, act of Feb. 2, 1901 (31 Stat. 749). That section superseded the provisions for the composition of regiments of Artillery contained in R. S. 1099, and subsequent statutes, including sec. 2, act of Mar. 8, 1898 (30 Stat. 261), sec. 3, act of Apr. 26, 1898 (30 Stat. 364), and sec. 3, act of Mar. 2, 1899 (30 Stat. 978), which were in turn superseded by said sec. 5, act of Jan, 25, 1907, which provided " That the Coast Artillery sball constitute a corps,

For provisions as to the Chief of Coast Artillery, see 2133, ante, and notes thereunder.

2138. The Army Mine Planter Service.-That hereafter there shall be in the Coast Artillery Corps of the Regular Army a service to be known as the Army Mine Planter Service, which shall consist, for each mine planter in the service of the United States, of one master, one first mate, one second mate, one chief engineer, and one assistant engineer, who shall be warrant officers appointed by and holding their offices at the discretion of the Secretary of War, and two oilers, four firemen, four deck hands, one cook, one steward, and one assistant steward, who shall be appointed from enlisted men of the Coast Artillery Corps under such regulations as the Secretary of War may prescribe: Provided, That the Coast Artillery Corps is hereby increased by such numbers of warrant officers and enlisted men as may be necessary to constitute the force provided by this chapter:

Chap. LX, act of July 9, 1918 (40 Stat. 881). But see 2137, ante.

2139. Warrant officers.—In addition to those authorized for the Army Mine Planter Service, there shall be not more than one thousand one hundred and twenty warrant officers, including band leaders, who shall hereafter be warrant officers. Appointments shall be made by the Secretary of War from among noncommissioned officers who have bad at least ten years' enlisted service; enlisted men who served as officers of the Army at some time between April 6, 1917, and November 11, 1918, and whose total service in the Army, enlisted and commissioned, amounts to five years; persons serving or who have served as Army field clerks or field clerks, Quartermaster Corps; and, in the case of those who are to be assigned to duty as band leaders, from among persons who served as Army band leaders at some time between April 6, 1917, and November 11, 1918, or enlisted men possessing suitable qualifications. * * Warrant officers other than those of the Army Mine Planter Service, * * and shall take rank next below second lieutenants and among themselves according to the dates of their respective warrants. Sec. ha, added to the act of June 9, 1916, by sec. he act of June 4, 1920 (41 Stat. 761).

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1101 2140. Recruit depot detachments and disciplinary guards.- *

Prorided further, That hereafter the Secretary of War shall be authorized to detach from the Army at large such number of enlisted men as may be neces. sary to perform duty at the various recruit depots and the United States military prison, and of the enlisted men so detached, and while performing such duty, there shall be allowed for each depot and the prison one who shall have the rank, pay, and allowances of battalion or squadron sergeant-major, and for each recruit and prison company one who shall have the rank, pay, and allowances of first sergeant, five the rank, pay, and allowances of sergeant, and six the rank, pay, and allowances of corporal, of the arm of the service to which they respectively belong. Act of June 12, 1906 (3) Stat. 212).

Prorided, That hereafter recruit and prison companies shall have noncommissioneel officers, musicians, artificers and cooks of the numbers and grades allowed by law for companies of infantry. Act of Alar. 2, 1907 (31 Stut. 1160 ).

See 2995, post.
2141. Remount detachments.-

Provided further, That irereafter from the enlisted force of the Army now provided by law the President Day authorize the organization of remount detachments at each of the rent depots, and may authorize the appointment therein of such noncommissioned officers, mechanics, artificers, farriers, horseshoers, and cooks as may be necessary for the administration of such remount depots: Provided, That nothing herein shall be so construed as to authorize an increase in the total pumber of enlisted men of the Army now authorized by law. Act of Mar. 3, 1911 (36 Stat. 1049).

But see 1671, ante.

2142. Service school detachments.- * Provided, That from the enlisted force of the army now provided by law the President may authorize the organization of school detachments at each of the service schools, and may authorize the appointment therein of such noncommissioned officers, mechanics, artificers, farriers, horseshoers, and cooks as may be necessary for the administration of such school: Provided, That nothing herein shall be construed as to authorize an increase in the total number of enlisted men of the army now authorized by law. Art of Mar. 3, 1909 (35 Stat. 133).

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See 2995, post.

2143. General provision for service schools.-To provide means for the theoretical and practical instruction at the Army Service Schools (including the General Staff School, the School of the Line, and the Signal Corps School at Fort Leavenworth, Kausas, the Army Field Service School and Correspondence School for Medical Officers, at Washington, District of Columbia, the Cavalry School at Fort Riley, Kansas, the Field Artillery Schools at Fort Sill, Ollahoma, and at Camp Zachary Taylor or Camp Knox, Kentucky, and for the Infantry School at Camp Benning, Georgia) by the purchase of textbooks, books of reference, scientific and professional papers, the purchase of modern instruments and material for the theoretical and practical instruction, employment of temporary, technical, or special services, and for all absolutely neces. sary expenses, to be allotted in such proportion as may, in the opinion of the Secretary of War, be for the best interests of the military service. Act of June 5, 1920 (1 Stat. 950), making appropriations for the support of the Army: United States Service Schools.

For complete list of service schools see par. 449, A. R., 1913.

The Infantry and Cavalry School was established at Fort Leavenworth, Kans., in possuance of General Orders, No. 42, Adjutant General's Office, of May 7, 1881. Alibough not created by statute, its existence was recognized by Congress in several acts of appropriation, beginning with the act of Mar. 2, 1889. It has been superseded br the "Army School of the Line," which was first recognized by statute in the act of Mar. 3, 1909 (35 Stat. 733).

2144. Infantry School.-For the construction of the necessary buildings for the Infantry School at Camp Benning, Georgia, including the installation or plumbing, heating, lighting, roads and walks, the sum of $1,000,000, remaining from “General Appropriations, Quartermaster Corps,” for the fiscal year ending Juue 30, 1919, is hereby appropriated and made immediately available and shall be arailable until expended : Prorided, That section 1136, Revised Statutes, and the provision contained in the Sundry Civil Appropriation set of June 23, 1910 (Thirty-sixth Statutes, page 721), prescribing limitations as to the cost of certain structure, shall not apply to structures to be constructed under this project. Act of June 5, 1920 (41 Stat. 963), making appropriations for the support of the Army: Buildings for Infantry Schools.

For R. S. 1136, see 1149, ante.
For act of June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. 721), see 1157, ante.

2145. Tank Corps schools.—Incidental expenses in connection with the operation of the Tank Corps schools, $5,000. Act of June 5, 1920 (1 Stat. 971), making appropriations for the support of the Army: Tank Corps Schools.

2146. The Mounted Service School.—That the Secretary of War be, and be is herehy, authorized and directed to establish upon the military reservation at Fort Riley a permanent school of instruction for drill and practice for the Cavalry and light artillery service of the Army of the United States, and which shall be the depot to which all recruits for such service shall be sent ;

Act of Jan, 29, 1887 (24, Stat. 372). A further provision of the section making an appropriation for construction of quarters, etc., to carry into effect the purposes of the act is omitted here as temporary merely and executed.

The Cavalry and Light Artillery Schoot was established in pursuance of the act of Jan. 29, 1887, by General Orders, No. 17, Adjutant General's Office, of Mar. 14, 1892. See also in connection with this schoo} the acts of Oct. 2, 1888 (25 Stat. 534), and Mar. 2, 1899 (id. 906). This school has been superseded by the Mounted Service School at Fort Riley, Kans.," and provision has been made therefor under that title beginning with the act of Mar. 3, 1909 (35 Stat. 733).

2147. Field Artillery schools. - To provide means for the theoretical and practical instruction in Field Artillery activities at the three brigade firing centers at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, Camp Bragg, North Carolina, and Camp Knox, Kentucky, by the purchase of modern instruments and material for theoretical and practical instruction, for the tuition of officers detailed as students at civil educational institutions, and for all other necessary expenses, to be allotted in such proportion as may, in the opinion of the Secretary of War, be for the best interests of the service, $6,000. Act of June 5, 1920 ( 11 Stat. 9)), making appropriations for the support of the Army: Field Artillery activities.

In the act of Aug. 24, 1912 (37 Stat. 570), under the appropriation for " United States Service Schools" provision is made for a “ School of Fire for Field Artillery at Fort Sill, Okla.," and this provision was continued in Inter acts.

2148. Coast Artillery School.-For incidental expenses of the school, incinding chemicals, stationery, printing, and binding; hardware; materials; cost of special instruction of officers detailed as instructors; employment of temporary, technical, or special services; tion and dissemination of military information,

for office furniture and fixtures, machinery, motor trucks, and unforeseen expenses, $11,600. Act of June 5, 1920 (41 Stat. 951), making appropriations for the support of the Army: Coast Artillery School.

The Artillery School was established at Fortress Monroe, Va., in pursuance of General Orders, No. 18, Adjutant General's Oflice, of Apr. 5, 1824. It ceased to exist in 1835 by reason of the transfer of the troops composing the school to other duties.

It was reestablished by General Orders, No. 9, Adjutant General's Office, of Oct. 30, 1856. A code of regulations and plan of instruction was approved by the Secretary of War and published to the Army in General Orders, No. 5, Adjutant General's Office, of May 18, 1858. The school was again discontinued at the outbreak of the War of the Rebellion in 1861. It was reorganized by General Orders, No. 99, Adjutant General's Office, of Nov. 13, 1867. Although not created by statute, its existence has been recognized and the courses of study pursued have been sanctioned by Congress in several acts of appropriation. See the various acts of appropriation from that of June 20, 1878 (20 Stat. 223). It was first appropriated for as the " Coast Artillery School " in the act of Mar. 3, 1909 (35 Stat. 733).

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2149. Engineer School.- Equipment and maintenance of the Engineer School, including purchase and repair of instruments, machinery, implements, models, boats, and materials for the use of the school and to provide means for the theoretical and practical instruction of Engineer officers and troops in their special duties as sappers and miners; for land mining, pontoniering, and sig. naling; for purchase and binding of scientific and professional works, papers, and periodicals treating on military engineering and scientific subjects, textbooks, and books of reference for the library of the United States Engineer School; for incidental expenses of the school, including chemicals, stationery, hardware, machinery, and boats; for pay of civilian clerks, draftsmen, electricians, mechanics, and laborers; compensation of civilian lecturers and payment of tuition fees of student officers at civil technical institutions; for unforeseen expenses ;

Act of June 5, 1920 (41 Stat. 969), making appropriations for the support of the Army: Engineer School.

The United States Engineer School was established by Executive order, but has been recognized in the several acts of appropriation from the act of Mar. 3, 1873 (17 Stat. 546). It was originally located at Fort Totten, Willets Point, N. Y., but was removed in 1902 to Washington Barracks, D. C. See General Orders, 155, A. G. 0, Nov. 27, 1901.

21491. General Staff College.-For expenses of the General Staff College, being for the purchase of the necessary stationery; typewriters and exchange of same; oflice, toilet, and desk furniture; textbooks, books of reference, scientific and professional papers and periodicals; printing and binding; maps; police utensils; the necessary fuel for heating the General Staff College Building and for lighting the building and grounds; employment of temporary technical or special services and expenses of special lectures; and for all other absolutely necessary expenses, including $25 per month additional to regular compensation to chief clerk for superintendence of the General Staff College Building; also for pay of a chief engineer at $1,400, an assistant engineer at $1,000, a carpenter at $1,000, four firemen at $720 each, an elevator conductor at $720; in all, $25,000. Act of June 5, 1920 (41 Stat. 949), making appropriations for the support of the Army: General Staff College.

The Army War College was established in accordance with the act of May 26, 1900 (31 Stat. 209), which made an appropriation

for contingent expenses incident to the establishment of the Army War College, baving for its object the direction and coordination of the instruction in the various service schools, extension of the opportunities for investigation and study in the Army and Militia of the United States, and the collec

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Appropriations were made therefor annually thereafter, ending with the act of July 9, 1919 (41 Stat. 105). By virtue of paragraphs 192 and 193, Special Orders No. 141--0, W. D., June 17, 1919, and of a letter dated June 18, 1919, from The Adjutant General of the Army to the commanding officer, Washington Barracks, D. C., the name Army War College was changed to General Staff College. The objects of the General Staff College are set forth in General Orders No. 112, W. D., 1919, and the above appropriation was made therefor.

2150. Indian Scouts.-The President is authorized to enlist a force of Indians not exceeding one thousand, who shall act as scouts in the Territories and Indian country. They shall be discharged when the necessity for their service shall cease, or at the discretion of the department commander. R. S. 1112.

That so much of the army appropriation act of twenty-fourth July, eighteen hundred and seventy-six, as limits the number of Indian scouts to three hundred is hereby repealed; and sections ten hundred and ninety-four and eleven hundred and twelve of the Revised Statutes, authorizing the employment of one thousand Indian scouts, are hereby continued in force: Provided, That a proportionate number of noncommissioned officers may be appointed.

Act of Aug. 12, 1876 (19 Stat. 131).

A force of Indian scouts, not exceeding 1,000, was authorized by R. S. 1094, as well as by this section. The Army appropriation act of July 24, 1876 (19 Stat. 97), provided payment for only 300 Indian scouts. But the implied limitation was repealed, and the provisions of R. S. 1094, 1112, authorizing the employment of 1,000 Indian scouts, were continued in force, and other provisions relating to such scouts were made by act of Aug. 12, 1876 (19 Stat. 131). ** Indian scouts as now authorized by law" were included in the composition of the Army by sec. 1, act of Feb. 2, 1901, but were omitted from the composition of the Regular Army by sec. 2, act of June 3, 1916. Indian scouts are included in sec. 2, act of June 4, 1920, ante, 2118. The enlistment of natives of the Philippine Islands, to be organized as scouts, was authorized by sec 36 of that act, 2151, post.

But see 2995, post.

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2151. Organization of Philippine Scouts.—That when in his opinion the conditions in the Philippine Islands justify such action the President is authorized to enlist natives of those islands for service in the Army, to be organized as scouts, with such officers as he shall deem necessary for their proper control, or as troops or companies, as authorized by this Act, for the Regular Army. The President is further authorized, in his discretion, to form companies, organized as are companies of the Regular Army, in squadrons or battalions, with officers and noncommissioned officers corresponding to similar organizations in the cavalry and infantry arms. The total number of enlisted men in said native organizations shall not exceed twelve thousand.

Scc. 36, act of Feb. 2, 1901 (31 Stat. 757).

"The President is authorized to form the Philippine Scouts into such branches and tactical units as he may deem expedient, within the limit of strength prescribed by law, organized similarly to those of the Regular Army, the officers to be detailed from those authorized in section 4 hereof.

* Nothing in this Act shall be construed to alter in any respect the present status of enlisted men of the Philippine Scouts.” Sec. 22a, added to the act of June 3, 1916, by sec. 22, act of June 4, 1920 (41 Stat. 770).

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