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We have not only conveyed, but given it, four years ago, to Corlaer, that is the Gov. Gen', to rule over it, and we now Convey and Transport it again and give it to the Gov. Genl or those who now Represent him ; and in confirmation hereof we have signed and sealed these Presents, Dated as above. This is the mark of

(L. 8.) Thaowe ratt Sachem of Cayuga

This is M oU the mark,
of Corrachjundie of

Cayuga
This is the mark of

Ochquari + okichke of Cayuga [L. S.]
Me present
Ro: Livingston Sec".

Albany the 26 Sept. 1683. Present as before.

ANSWER TO THE PROPOSALS OF THE CAYUGAS AND ONNONDAGES.

We have heard your Proposals and thankfully accept for Corlaer the conveyance of the Susquehanne River, with the Land situate thereupon and have seen that you have adhered to your word of over four years since, and in confirmation of your gift and conveyance of the Land aforesaid have signed and sealed it. We, therefore, give you a half piece of Duffels, Two Blankets, Two guns, Three kettles, Four Coats, Fifty lbs. of Lead and Five and twenty lbs. of powder.

Meanwhile we shall communicate this to His Excell: the Gov: Genl. of whose good disposition towards you, you need not doubt, who will compensate you therefor when occasion permits.

Whereupon the Sakamakers have signed and sealed their gift and conveyance as is to be seen on the other side, and have accepted in full satisfaction, the aforesaid presents. Albany in the Court house as above.

CORNELIS Van Dyck
DIRCK WESSELLS
JAN JANZ BLEECKER
PIETER WINNE.

[Council Min. V.] At a Council held at ffort James in New York, Octobr. (1683. Psent

The Governor
Capt. A. Brockholls

Mr. ffr. Flypsen
J. Spragge Mr. S. V. Cortland
The Indians being asked if they were only for the Maquas, they
answered, yes; and came from the three castles of the Maquas

Speech of the Sachem Odianah. That ossoone as they received the Message, they came hither and are very gladd to be so well received and that his Maty hath so great a kindness for them; os for the Indians that are gone to Canada, they are very gladd his honor speaks of it and they will endeavour to get them back againe and they desire the Governor's assistance in it that they may goe hand in hand to promote it, and they doubt not to get them back againe.

That when they were sent for hither they did not know what might be proposed to them; and for Corlear's proposition to make peace with the Indians they war against, they say that ossoone as they com home they shall have a Generall meeting of all the Castles and will tell them what is here proposed and doubt not but it shall be effected; for the former Governor said the same and they obeyed and made peace and why should it not be allso at this time performed, for they have been allways obedient to this govermt that his Honor having told them to have an eye to the ffrenchmen, they give his Honor their thanks, & will allways have an open eye to those people, and they desire if any thing happen to be informed for they are and have been allways belonging to this Governmt. and we espect no favo" from the ffrench, but will put themselves under his Honos. protection. That the Governor haveing wondred why they bring so little Beaver and formerly did bring so much, that it may be the Govern thinks they carry it to some other Governmt they answer no they do not They never had so firm a friendshipp with any, os with this Government but the true reason is they haveing a warre with other Indians, those Indians would not dare to come on their hunting places; but now they are all in peace; the Indians catch away the Beaver so fast that ther be but very few left; his Hono haveing told them they should harbour no ffrench but the Jesuits and each of them a man, they answer they will never suffer any straggling ffrenchmen amongst them, but those Jesuits who are very good men and very quiett; and yet if his Honor shall please, they will send them away allso ; and that none hath any land from them and they are resolved never to sell or give them any or any others except the people of this Governmt that they were sent for by the Governt of Canada who told them that they should make a peace with all the Indians and that the Govern' took their axe and threw it into the water, but did not bury it because if it had bin buried it might have been taken up again ; and that nothing shall com to their ears but they will acquaint this Governm' with it, and expect the same from this Government.

They allso say the Govern of Canada promised them to have free passage upon all the Rivers and Creeks and said they should suffer all other Indians to have the same & the Govern took them os his children and told them they should be all of the ffrench Religion.

That all this land is under the Governmt of his Rol Highss that there has been som Strangers at Albany to buy the Susquehannah River, but they have considered and will not sell it to them except by the particular leave of his Hono'.

The Govern desired them to make up the differences amongst themselves about Susquehanna River in a civil and peaceable way, that being don to send word to the Governo", and that then he will give them fuller orders about it.

At a Council held Aprill 29th, 1684.
P'sent

The Governor
Mr Lucas Santen

Coll Lewis Morris. Mr. Willm Welch said Govern" Penn had a desire to treat wth the Indians of Susquehannah River by the consent of the Governo' of New-York.

J. Spragg.

Mr. Lloyd said that Govern" Penn complained of ye unkind usages and sinister dealings of the people of Albany who caused him to be put to a vast expence in bringing down the Indians and the desire of Govern" Penn was that hath already bin expended may be valued and som consideration had to the loss of time and monies.

Governor Dongan replyed that as for the charges Mr Penn had bin at he had nothing to say to it, that they of Albany have suspition it is only to get away their trade and that Mr. Penn hath land allready more than he can people these many yeares that the Indians have long since given over their land to this Govermi and advised them to write over to the Duke about it.

Mr Lloy & M'. Welch desired a letter from the Governo' to the Indians wch was not granted.

FATHER LAMBERVILLE TO M. DE LA BARRE.
[Paris Doc. II.)

February 10, 1684. The man named Oreouaké of Cayuga told me also that he would go to Montreal to see you. 'Tis he who caused Father de Carheil to withdraw and who treacherously brought the six Tionnontates to Cayuga. He is extremely proud. Sorennoa and he are the two most considerable Captains of Cayuga. It was of this Oreouaké that the English of Albany (formerly Orange) made use to prevent Sieur Penn purchasing the Country of the Andastognés who have been conquered by the Iroquois and the English of Merilande.

ABSTRACT OF THE PROPOSALLS OF THE ONOUNDAGES AND CAYOUGES SACHEMS AT NEW YORK, 2. August 1684.

[Lond. Doc. IV.] That the English will protect them from the French otherwise they shall loose all the Beaver and hunting.

That they have put themselves and their lands under the Protection of the King and have given Susquehannah River to the Government of New York of which they desire it may be a Branch, and under which they will shelter themselves from the French.

That Penn's people may not settle under the Susquehannah River.

They have putt themselves under the King and give two Deer Skins for the King to write upon them, and put a great read Seale to them, that they put all their lands under His Maty and under no other Government then New Yorke.

They desire these proposal]s may be sent to the King with a Belt of Wampum peeg and another small Belt for the Duke of York.

And they give Col. Dungan a Beaver to send orer this Pro

posall.

And my Lord Effingham is desired to take notice that Penn's agents would have bought the Susquehanna River of them, but they would not, but fasteued it to the government of New York.

That being a free people uniting themselves to the English, it may be in their power to give their land to what Sachim they please.

PROPOSITION OR ORATION

OF THE OXON DAGOES AND CAYOUGES SACHIMS MADE IN THE TOWN

HALL ALBANY BEFORE THE RIGHT HONble THE LORD HOWARD OF EFFINGHAM, GOVERNOR OF VIRGINIA AND COL. THOMAS DUNGAN GOV OF NEW YORK UPON THE 20 DAY OF AUGUST 1684.

(Lond. Doc. V.] Brother Corlaer

Your Sachim is a great Sachim and we are but a small people, When the English came to Manhattans that is N. York, Aragiske which is now called Virginia, and to Jaquokranogare now called Maryland, they were but a small people and we a great people, and finding they were good people we gave them land and treated them civilly, and now since you are a great peo

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