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part of the crews; and on this claim being substantiated, the surrender shall not be refused. Such deserters, when arrested, shall be placed at the disposal of the Consuls or Vice-Consuls, and may be confined in the public prisons at the request and cost of those who shall claim them, in order to be sent to the vessels to which they belong, or to others of the same country. But if not sent back within three months of the day of their arrest, they shall be set at liberty, and shall not again be arrested for the same cause. However, if the deserter shall be found to have committed any crime or offense, his surrender may be delayed until the tribunal before which his case shall be pending shall have pronounced its sentence, and such sentence shall have been carried into effect.

1424. ARTICLE XXVII. The United States of America and the Dominican Republic, on requisitions made in their name through the medium of their respective Diplomatic and Consular Agents, shall deliver up to justice persons who, being charged with the crimes enumerated in the following article, committed within the jurisdiction of the requiring party, shall seek asylum or shall be found within the territories of the other: Provided, That this shall be done only when the fact of the commission of the crime shall be so established as to justify their apprehension and commitment for trial if the crime had been committed in the country where the persons so accused shall be found; in all of which the tribunals of said country shall proceed and decide according to their own laws.

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ECUADOR.

Treaty concluded June 13, 1839 (Peace, Friendship, Navigation, and

Commerce).

1425. ARTICLE XXIX. To make more effectual the protection which the United States and the Republic of Ecuador shall afford in future to the navigation and commerce of the citizens of each other, they agree to receive and admit Consuls and Vice-Consuls in all the ports open to foreign commerce, who shall enjoy in them all the rights, prerogatives, and immunities of the Consuls and Vice-Consuls of the most favored nation; each contracting party, however, remaining at liberty to except those ports and places in which the admission and residence of such Consuls and Vice-Consuls may not seem convenient.

1426. ARTICLE XXX.

In order that the Consuls and Vice-Consuls of the two contracting arties may enjoy the rights, prerogatives, and immunities which elong to them by their public character, they shall, before entering o the exercise of their functions, exhibit their commission or patent i due form to the Government to which they are accredited, and, havig obtained their exequatur, they shall be held and considered as such y all the authorities, magistrates, and inhabitants in the Consular disrict in which they reside.

427. ARTICLE XXXI.

It is likewise agreed that the Consuls, their secretaries, officers, and versons attached to the service of Consuls, they not being citizens of he country in which the Consul resides, shall be exempted from all inds of taxes, imposts, and contributions, except those which they hall be obliged to pay on account of commerce or their property, to which the citizens and inhabitants, native and foreign, of the country n which they reside, are subject; being, in everything besides, subject o the laws of the respective states. The archives and papers of the Consulates shall be respected inviolably, and under no pretext whativer shall any magistrate seize or in any way interfere with them.

1428. ARTICLE XXXII.

The said Consuls shall have power to require the assistance of the luthorities of the country for the arrest, detention, and custody of leserters from the public and private vessels of their country, and for that purpose they shall address themselves to the courts, judges, and officers competent, and shall demand the said deserters in writing, proving by an exhibition of the register of the vessel's or ship's roll, or other public documents, that those men were part of the said crews, and on this demand so proved (saving, however, where the contrary is proved), the delivery shall not be refused. Such deserters, when arrested, shall be put at the disposal of said Consuls, and may be put in the public prisons at the request and expense of those who reclaim them, to be sent to the ships to which they belonged, or to others of the same nation. But if they be not sent back within two months, to be counted from the day of their arrest, they shall be set at liberty, and shall be no more arrested for the same cause.

search, seizure, and arrest of the said deserters, who shall be even detained and kept in the prisons of the country, at their request and expense until they shall have found opportunity of sending them back. But it they be not sent back within two months, to be counted from the day of their arrest, they shall be set at liberty, and shall be no more arreste for the same cause.

It is understood, however, that if the deserter should be found to har committed any crime or offense, his surrender may be delayed until the tribunal before which the case shall be depending shall have pronounce its sentence, and such sentence shall have been carried into effect.

The present additional article shall have the same force and value a if it were inserted, word for word, in the Convention signed at Wash ington on the twentieth day of December, one thousand eight hundre and twenty-seven.

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Convention for the mutual extension of the jurisdiction of Consuls betica

the United States of America and the Free and Hanseatic Republics q Hamburg, Bremen, and Lubeck, concluded at Washington, April 3 1852.

1465. ARTICLE I.

The Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Commercial, and Vice-Commercial Agents of each of the high contracting parties shall have the right, as such, ti sit as judges and arbitrators in such differences as may arise between the masters and crews of the vessels belonging to the nation whose inter ests are committed to their charge, without the interference of the loca authorities, unless the conduct of the crews or of the master should dis turb the order or tranquillity of the country; or the said Consuls, Vict Consuls, Commercial Agents, or Vice-Commercial Agents, should requir their assistance in executing or supporting their own decisions. Bo this species of judgment or arbitration shall not deprive the contendin parties of the right they have to resort, on their return, to the judicia authority of their own country.

1466. ARTICLE II.

The present Convention shall be in force for the term of twelve year from the day of its ratifications; and further until the end of twelv months after the Government of the United States on the one part, a the Free and Hanseatic Republics of Hamburg, Bremen, or Lubeck, o her of them, on the other part, shall have given notice of their intenon to terminate the same; each of the contracting parties reserving to self the right of giving such notice to the other at the end of the said rm of twelve years. And it is hereby agreed that, at the expiration of relve months after such notice shall have been received by either of the irties from the other, this convention, and all the provisions thereof, iall altogether cease and determine, as far as regards the States giving id receiving such notice; it being always understood and agreed that one or more of the Free and Hanseatic Republics aforesaid shall, at le expiration of twelve years from the date of the ratification of the invention, give or receive notice of the termination of the same, it shall, evertheless, remain in full force and operation, as far as regards the maining Free and Hanseatic Republics or Republic, which may not ave given or received such notice.

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.

Treaty concluded December 20, 1849 (Friendship, Commerce, and Navi

gation).

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1467. ARTICLE X. Each of the two contracting parties may have, in the ports of the other, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Commercial Agents of their own appointment, who shall enjoy the same privileges and powers with those of the most avored nations; but if any such consuls shall exercise commerce, they shall be subject to the same laws and usage to which the private indiriduals of their nation are subject in the same place. The said Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Commercial Agents are authorized to require the assistance of the local authorities for the search, arrest, detention, and imprisonment of the deserters from the ships of war and merchant-vessels of their country. For this purpose they shall apply to the competent tribunals, judges, and officers, and shall, in writing, demand the said deserters, proving by the exhibition of the registers of the vessels, the rolls of the crews, or by other official documents, that such individnals formed part of the crews; and this reclamation being thus substantiated, the surrender shall not be refused. Such deserters, when arrested, shall be placed at the disposal of the said Consuls, Vice-Consuls, or Commercial Agents, and may be confined in the public prisons, at the request and cost of those who shall claim them, in order to be detained until the time when they shall be restored to the vessel to which they belonged, or sent back to their own country by a vessel of the same nation, or any other vessel whatsoever. The agents, owners, or masters of vessels o. account of whom the deserters have been apprehended upon requisition of the local authorities, shall be required to take or send away such deserters from the States and dominion of the contracting parties, or give such security for their good conduct as the law may require. But if not sent back nor reclaimed within six months from the day of their arrest. or if all the expenses of such imprisonment are not defrayed by the party causing such arrest and imprisonment, they shall be set at liberty, and shall not again be arrested for the same cause. However, if the deserters should be found to have committed any crime or offense, their surrender may be delayed until the tribunal before which their case shall be depending shall have pronounced its sentence, and such sentence shall have been carried into effect.

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1468. ARTICLE XII. If any ships of war or other vessels be wrecked on the coasts of the States or territories of either of the contracting parties, such ships or vessels, or any parts thereof, and all furniture and appartenances belonging thereunto, and all goods and merchandise which shall be saved therefrom, or the produce thereof, if sold, shall be faithfully restored, with the least possible delay, to the proprietors, upon being claimed by them or by their duly authorized factors; and if there are no such proprietors or factors on the spot, then the said goods and merchandise, or the proceeds thereof, as well as all the papers found on board such wrecked ships or vessels shall be delivered to the American or Hawaiian Consul or Vice-Consul in whose district the wreck may have taken place; and such Consul, Vice-Consul, proprietors, or factors, shall pay only the expenses incurred in the preservation of the property, together with the rate of salvage and expenses of quarantine which would have been payable in the like case of a wreck of a national vessel; and the goods and merchandise saved from the wreck shall not be subject to duties unless entered for consumption, it being understood that in case of any legal claim upon such wreck, goods, or merchandise, the same shall be referred for decision to the competent tribunals of the country.

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