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94. ARTICLE XXIV. Where there are debts due by subjects of China to citizens of the nited States the latter may seek redress in law; and on suitable repreptations being made to the local authorities, through the Consul, they ill cause due examination in the premises, and take proper steps to mpel satisfaction. And if citizens of the United States be indebted to ibjects of China, the latter may seek redress by representation through je Consul, or by suit in the Consular Court; but neither Government ill hold itself responsible for such debts.

1395. ARTICLE XXVIII. If citizens of the United States have special occasion to address any bmmunication to the Chinese local officers of Government, they shall ubmit the same to their Consul or other officer, to determine if the lanpage be proper and respectful and the matter just and right, in which rent he shall transmit the same to the appropriate authorities for their onsideration and action in the premises. If subjects of China have ccasion to address the Consul of the United States, they may address im directly at the same time they inform their own officers, representng the case for his consideration and action in the premises; and if conroversies arise between citizens of the United States and subjects of China, which cannot be amicably settled otherwise, the same shall be xamined and decided conformably to justice and equity by the public ficers of the two nations, acting in conjunction. The extortion of illesal fees is expressly prohibited. Any peaceable persons are allowed to ater the court in order to interpret, lest injustice be done.

Supplemental treaty, concluded November 17, 1880.

1396. ARTICLE I. The Governments of the United States and China, recognizing the benefits of their past commercial relations, and in order still further to promote such relations between the citizens and subjects of the two powers

, mutually agree to give the most careful and favorable attention to the representations of either as to such special extension of commercial intercourse as either may desire.

1397. ARTICLE II.

The Governments of China and of the United States mutually agree and undertake that Chinese subjects shall not be permitted to import opium into any of the ports of the United States; and citizens of the United States shall not be permitted to import opium into any of the open porti of China; to transport it from one open port to any other open port; a to buy and sell opium in any of the open ports of China. This absolut prohibition, which extends to vessels owned by the citizens or subject of either power, to foreign vessels employed by them, or to vessel owned by the citizens or subjects of either power and employed by othe persons for the transportation of opium, shall be enforced by appropriat legislation on the part of China and the United States; and the benefit of the favored nation clause in existing treaties shall not be claime by the citizens or subjects of either power as against the provisions a this article.

1998. ARTICLE III. His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China hereby promises and agrex that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage dues, or duties for imports or exports, or coastwise trade shall be imposed or levied in the open ports of China upon vessels wholly belonging to citizens of the United States; or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise imported in the same from the United States; or from any foreign country; or upor the produce, manufactures, or merchandise exported in the same to the United States or to any foreign country; or transported in the same from one open port of China to another, than are imposed or levied on vessel or cargoes of any other nation or on those of Chinese subjects.

The United States hereby promise and agree that no other kind o higher rate of tonnage dues or duties for imports shall be imposed of levied in the ports of the United States upon vessels wholly belonging to thesubjects of His Imperial Majesty and coming either directly or by way of any foreign port, from any of the ports of China which are open to foreign trade, to the ports of the United States; or returning therefrom either directly or by way of any foreign port, to any of the open ports of China; or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise imported in the same from China or from any foreign country, than are imposed 01 levied on vessels of other nations which make no discrimination against the United States in tonnage dues or duties on imports, exports, o coastwise trade; or than are imposed or levied on vessels and cargoes of citizens of the United States.

1399. ARTICLE IV. When controversies arise in the Chinese Empire between citizens of e United States and subjects of his Imperial Majesty, which need to

examined and decided by the public officers of the two nations, it is Teed between the Governments of the United States and China that ich cases shall be tried by the proper official of the nationality of the fendant. The properly authorized official of the plaintiff's nationality all be freely permitted to attend the trial and shall be treated with le courtesy due to his position. He shall be granted all proper facilies for watching the proceedings in the interests of justice. If he so sires, he shall have the right to present, to examine, and to crosscamine witnesses. If he is dissatisfied with the proceedings, he shall e permitted to protest against them in detail. The law administered Fill be the law of the nationality of the officer trying the case.

Immigration treaty, concluded November 17, 1880.

1400. ARTICLE I. Whenever, in the opinion of the Government of the United States, the buning of Chinese laborers to the United States, or their residence kerein, affects or threatens to affect the interests of that country, or to ndanger the good order of the said country or of any locality within be territory thereof, the Government of China agrees that the Governhent of the United States may regulate, limit, or suspend such coming ir residence, but may not absolutely prohibit it. The limitation or suspension shall be reasonable and shall apply only to Chinese who may go bo the United States as laborers, other classes not being included in the imitations. Legislation taken in regard to Chinese laborers will be of such a character only as is necessary to enforce the regulation, limitation, or suspension of immigration, and immigrants shall not be subject to personal maltreatment or abuse.

1401. ARTICLE II. Chinese subjects, whether proceeding to the United States as teachers, students, merchants, or from curiosity, together with their body and household servants, and Chinese laborers who are now in the United States shall be allowed to go and come of their own free will and accord, and shall be accorded all the rights, privileges, immunities, and esem tions which are accorded to the citizens and subjects of the most favor nation.

1402. ARTICLE III. If Chinese laborers, or Chinese of any other class, now either pert nently or temporarily residing in the territory of the United Stat meet with ill treatment at the hands of any other persons, the Gore ment of the United States will exert all its power to devise measures i their protection and to secure to them the same rights, privileges, imm nities, and exemptions as may be enjoyed by the citizens or subjects the most favored nation, and to which they are entitled by treaty.

Convention, concluded March 17, 1894 (Emigration between the two

countries).

1403. ARTICLE I. The High Contracting Parties agree that for a period of ten year beginning with the date of the exchange of the ratifications of this Co vention, the coming, except under the conditions hereinafter specifie of Chinese laborers to the United States shall be absolutely prohibite

1404. ARTICLE II. The preceding Article shall not apply to the return to the United Stat of any registered Chinese laborer who has a lawful wife, child, or pare in the United States, or property therein of the value of one thousar dollars, or debts of like amount due him and pending settlement. Neve theless every such Chinese laborer shall, before leaving the United State deposit, as a condition of his return, with the collector of customs of t district from which he departs, a full description in writing of his far ily, or property, or debts, as aforesaid, and shall be furnished by sa collector with such certificate of his right to return under this Trea as the laws of the United States may now or hereafter prescribe and inconsistent with the provisions of this Treaty; and should the writti description aforesaid be proved to be false, the right of return ther under, or of continued residence after return, shall in each case be fa feited. And such right of return to the United States shall be exercis within one year from the date of leaving the United States; but sue right of return to the United States may be extended for an addition period, not to exceed one year, in cases where by reason of sickness

jer cause of disability beyond his control, such Chinese laborer shall rendered unable sooner to return—which facts shall be fully reported the Chinese Consul at the port of departure, and by him certified, to a satisfaction of the collector of the port at which such Chinese subit shall land in the United States. And no such Chinese laborer shall permitted to enter the United States by land or sea without producg to the proper officer of the customs the return certificate herein quired.

1405. ARTICLE III. The provisions of this Convention shall not affect the right at present joyed of Chinese subjects, being officials, teachers, students, merlants or travellers for curiosity or pleasure, but not laborers, of comg to the United States and residing therein. To entitle such Chinese bjects as are above described to admission into the United States, ley may produce a certificate from their Government or the Governent where they last resided vised by the diplomatic or consular reprentative of the United States in the country or port whence they part. It is also agreed that Chinese laborers shall continue to enjoy the rivilege of transit across the territory of the United States in the course their journey to or from other countries, subject to such regulations y the Government of the United States as may be necessary to prevent kid privilege of transit from being abused.

1406. ARTICLE IV. In pursuance of Article ill of the Immigration Treaty between the "nited States and China, signed at Peking on the 17th day of November, 881, (the 15th day of the tenth month of Kwanghsü, sixth year) it is ereby understood and agreed that Chinese laborers or Chinese of any ther class, either permanently or temporarily residing in the United States. shall have for the protection of their persons and property all rights that are given by the laws of the United States to citizens of the most favored nation, excepting the right to become naturalized citizens. And the Government of the United States reaffirms its obligation, as stated in said Article III, to exert all its power to secure protection to the persons and property of all Chinese subjects in the United States.

1407. ARTICLE V. The Government of the United States, having by an Act of the Congress, approved May 5, 1892, as amended by an Act approved November

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