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Consul shall report the same to the Commissioner of Customs, who shall note on the port clearance that the tonnage duties have been paid, and report the circumstances to the Collectors at the other custom-houses; in which case, the said vessel shall only pay duty on her cargo, and not be charged with tonnage duty a second time. The Collectors of Customs at the open ports shall consult with the Consuls about the erection of beacons or light-houses, and where buoys and light-ships should be placed.

1387. ARTICLE XVII. Citizens of the United States shall be'allowed to engage pilots to take their vessels into port, and, when the lawful duties have all been paid, take them out of port. It shall be lawful for them to hire at pleasure servants, compradors, linguists, writers, laborers, seamen, and persons for whatever necessary service, with passage or cargo boats, for a reasonable compensation, to be agreed upon by the parties or determined by the Consul.

1388. ARTICLE XVIII. Whenever merchant-vessels of the United States shall enter a port, the Collector of Customs shall, if he see fit, appoint custom-house officers to guard said vessels, who may live on board the ship or their own boats, at their convenience. The local authorities of the Chinese Government shall cause to be apprehended all mutineers or deserters from on board the vessels of the United States in China on being informed by the Consul, and will deliver them up to the Consuls or other officer for punishment. And if criminals, subjects of China, take refuge in the houses or on board the vessels of citizens of the United States, they shall not be harbored or concealed, but shall be delivered up to justice on due requisition by the Chinese local officers, addressed to those of the United States. The merchants, seamen, and other citizens of the United States shall be under the superintendence of the appropriate officers of their Government. If individuals of either nation commit acts of violence or disorder, use arms to the injury of others, or create disturbances endangering life, the officers of the two Governments will exert themselves to enforce order and to maintain the public peace, by doing impartial justice in the premises.

1389. ARTICLE XIX. Whenever a merchant-vessel belonging to the United States shall cast anchor in either of the said ports, the supercargo, master, or consignee, shall, within forty-eight hours, deposit the ship's papers in the lands of the Consul or person charged with his functions, who shall ause to be communicated to the Superintendent of Customs a true eport of the name and tonnage of such vessel, the number of her crew, ind the nature of her cargo, which being done, he shall give a permit or her discharge. And the master, supercargo, or consignee, if he proneed to discharge the cargo without such permit, shall incur a fine of ive hundred dollars, and the goods so discharged without permit shall be subject to forfeiture to the Chinese Government. But if a master of iny vessel in port desire to discharge a part only of the cargo, it shall pe lawful for him to do so, paying duty on such part only, and to proceed with the remainder to any other ports. Or, if the master so desire, ne may, within forty-eight hours after the arrival of the vessel, but not ater, decide to depart without breaking bulk; in which case he shall not be subject to pay tonnage or other duties or charges until, on his arrival at another port, he shall proceed to discharge cargo, when he shall pay the duties on vessel and cargo, according to law. And the tonnage duties shall be held due after the expiration of the said fortyeight hours. In case of the absence of the Consul or person charged with his functions, the captain or supercargo of the vessel may have recourse to the Consul of a friendly power, or, if he please, directly to the Superintendent of Customs, who shall do all that is required to conduct the ship's business.

1390. ARTICLE XX.

The Superintendent of Customs, in order to the collection of the proper duties, shall, on application made to him through the Consul, appoint suitable officers, who shall proceed, in the presence of the capain, supercargo, or consignee, to make a just and fair examination of all goods in the act of being discharged for importation or laden for sportation on board any merchant-vessel of the United States. And if lisputes occur in regard to the value of goods subject to ad valorem duty, or in regard to the amount of tare, and the same cannot be satisfactorily arranged by the parties, the question may, within twenty-four hours, and not afterward, be referred to the said Consul to adjust with the Superintendent of Customs.

1391. ARTICLE XXI.

Citizens of the United States who may have imported merchandise into any of the free ports of China, and paid the duty thereon, if they desire to re-export the same in part or in whole to any other of the said ports,

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shall be entitled to make application, through their Consul, to the Saperintendent of Customs, who, in order to prevent fraud on the reventshall cause examination to be made, by suitable officers, to see that tiduties paid on such goods as are entered on the custom-house books co:respond with the representation made, and that the goods remain with their original marks unchanged, and shall then make a memorandum iz the port clearance of the goods and the amount of duties paid on th: same, and deliver the same to the merchant, and shall also certify thfacts to the offic rs of customs of the other ports; all which being dole on the arrival in port of the vessel in which the goods are laden, and. everything being found, on examination there, to correspond, she shall be permitted to break bulk and land the said goods without being suject to the payment of any additional duty thereon. But, if, on such examination, the Superintendent of Customs shall detect any fraud on the revenue in the case, then the goods shall be subject to forfeiture and confiscation to the Chinese Government. Foreigr. grain or rice brought into any port of China in a ship of the United States, and not landed, may be re-exported without hindrance.

1392. ARTICLE XXII.

The tonnage duty on vessels of the United States shall be paid on their being admitted to entry. Duties of import shall be paid on the dis charge of the goods, and duties of export on the lading of the same When all such duties shall have been paid, and not before, the collectu of customs shall give a port clearance, and the Consul shall return the ship's papers. The duties shall be paid to the shroffs authorized by the Chinese Government to receive the same. Duties shall be paid and received, either in sycee silver or in foreign money, at the rate of the day. If the Consul permits a ship to leave the port before the duties and tonnage dues are paid, he shall be held responsible therefor.

1393. ARTICLE XXIII.

When goods on board any merchant-vessel of the United States in port require to be transshipped to another vessel, application shall be made to the Consul, who shall certify what is the occasion therefor to the Superintendent of Customs, who may appoint officers to examine into the facts and permit the transshipment. And if any goods be transshipped without written permits they shall be subject to be forfeited to the Chinese Government.

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94. ARTICLE XXIV. Where there are debts due by subjects of China to citizens of the United States the latter may seek redress in law; and on suitable representations being made to the local authorities, through the Consul, they will cause due examination in the premises, and take proper steps to compel satisfaction. And if citizens of the United States be indebted to subjects of China, the latter may seek redress by representation through the Consul, or by suit in the Consular Court; but neither Government will hold itself responsible for such debts.

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1395. ARTICLE XXVIII. If citizens of the United States have special occasion to address any communication to the Chinese local officers of Government, they shall submit the same to their Consul or other officer, to determine if the language be proper and respectful and the matter just and right, in which event he shall transmit the same to the appropriate authorities for their consideration and action in the premises. If subjects of China have occasion to address the Consul of the United States, they may address him directly at the same time they inform their own officers, representing the case for his consideration and action in the premises; and if controversies arise between citizens of the United States and subjects of China, which cannot be amicably settled otherwise, the same shall be examined and decided conformably to justice and equity by the public officers of the two nations, acting in conjunction. The extortion of illegal fees is expressly prohibited. Any peaceable persons are allowed to enter the court in order to interpret, lest injustice be done.

Supplemental treaty, concluded November 17, 1880.

1396. ARTICLE I. The Governments of the United States and China, recognizing the benefits of their past commercial relations, and in order still further to promote such relations between the citizens and subjects of the two powers, mutually agree to give the most careful and favorable attention to the representations of either as to such special extension of commercial intercourse as either may desire.

1397. ARTICLE II. The Governments of China and of the United States mutually agree and undertake that Chinese subjects shall not be permitted to import opium. into any of the ports of the United States; and citizens of the United States shall not be permitted to import opium into any of the open ports of China; to transport it from one open port to any other open port; or to buy and sell opium in any of the open ports of China. This absoluta prohibition, which extends to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either power, to foreign vessels employed by them, or to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either power and employed by other persons for the transportation of opium, shall be enforced by appropriate legislation on the part of China and the United States; and the benefits of the favored nation clause in existing treaties shall not be claimed by the citizens or subjects of either power as against the provisions of this article.

1998. ARTICLE III. His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China hereby promises and agres that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage dues, or duties for imports or exports, or coastwise trade shall be imposed or levied in the open ports of China upon vessels wholly belonging to citizens of the United States; or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise imported in the same from the United States; or from any foreign country; or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise exported in the same to the United States or to any foreign country; or transported in the same from one open port of China to another, than are imposed or levied on vessels or cargoes of any other nation or on those of Chinese subjects.

The United States hereby promise and agree that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage dues or duties for imports shall be imposed or levied in the ports of the United States upon vessels wholly belonging to the subjects of His Imperial Majesty and coming either directly or by way of any foreign port, from any of the ports of China which are open to foreign trade, to the ports of the United States; or returning therefrom either directly or by way of any foreign port, to any of the open ports of China; or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise imported in the same from China or from any foreign country, than are imposed or levied on vessels of other nations which make no discrimination against the United States in tonnage dues or duties on imports, exports, or coastwise trade; or than are imposed or levied on vessels and cargoes of citizens of the United States.

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