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1369 ARTICLE XX. Citizens of the United States who may have imported merchandise into ny of the free ports of China, and paid the duty thereon, if they desire o re-export the same, in part or in whole, to any other of the said ports, hall be entitled to make application, through their Consul, to the Superatendent of Customs, who, in order to prevent frauds on the revenue, hall canse examination to be made by suitable officers, to see that the laties paid on such goods as entered on the custom-house books correpond with the representation made, and that the goods remain with heir original marks unchanged, and shall then make a memorandum a the port clearance of the goods, and the amount of duties paid on the ame, and deliver the same to the merchant; and shall also certify the acts to the officers of customs of other ports; all of which being done, in the arrival in port of the vessel in which the goods are laden, and verything being found on examination there to correspond, she will

permitted to break bulk and land the said goods, without being mbject to the payment of any additional duty thereon. But if, on such xamination, the Superintendent of Customs shall detect any fraud on the revenue in the case, then the goods shall be subject to forfeiture and bonfiscation to the Chinese Government.

1370. ARTICLE XXI. Subjects of China, who may be guilty of any criminal act toward citizens of the United States, shall be arrested and punished by the Chinese authorities according to the laws of China; and citizens of the Cnited States, who may commit any crime in China, shall be subject to be tried and punished only by the Consul, or other public functionary of the United States thereto authorized, according to the laws of the United States. And in order to the prevention of all controversy and disaffection, justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides.

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1371. ARTICLE XXIII. The Consuls of the United States at each of the five ports open to foreign trade shall make, annually, to the respective governors-general thereof, a detailed report of the number of vessels belonging to the United States which have entered and left said ports during the year, and of the amount and value of goods imported or exported in said vessels, for transmission to and inspection of the board of revenue.

1372. ARTICLE XXIV. If citizens of the United States have special occasion to address any communication to the Chinese local officers of government, they shal submit the same to their Consul, or other officer, to determine if the language be proper and respectful, and the matter just and right; it which event he shall transmit the same to the appropriate authoritie for their consideration and action in the premises. In like manner, i subjects of China have special occasion to address the Consul of thi United States, they shall submit the communication to the local au thorities of their own Government, to determine if the language bi respectful and proper, and the matter just and right; in which case th said authorities will transmit the same to the Consul or other office for his consideration and action in the premises. And if controversie arise between citizens of the United States and subjects of China which cannot be amicably settled otherwise, the same shall be exam ined and decided conformably to justice and equity by the public offi cers of the two nations acting in conjunction.

1373. ARTICLE XXV. All questions in regard to rights, whether of property or person, aris ing between citizens of the United States in China, shall be subject to the jurisdiction and regulated by the authorities of their own govern ment; and all controversies occurring in China between citizens of thi United States and the subjects of any other government shall be regu lated by the treaties existing between the United States and such Gom ernments, respectively, without interference on the part of China.

1374. ARTICLE XXVI. Merchant-vessels of the United States, lying in the waters of the five ports of China open to foreign commerce, will be under the jurisdiction of the officers of their own Government, who, with the masters and owners thereof, will manage the same without control on the part of China. For injuries done to the citizens or the commerce of the United States by any foreign power, the Chinese Government will not hold itself bound to make reparation. But if the merchant-vessels of thư United States, while within the waters over which the Chinese Govern ment exercises jurisdiction, be plundered by robbers or pirates, ther the Chinese local authorities, civil and military, on receiving inforina tion thereof, will arrest the said robbers or pirates, and punish them

ording to law, and will cause all the property which can be recovered be placed in the hands of the nearest Consul, or other officer of the tited States, to be restored by him to the true owner. But if, by rea1 of the extent of territory and numerous population of China, it buld, in any case, happen that the robbers cannot be apprehended, or property only in part recovered, then the law will take its course in gard to the local authorities, but the Chinese Government will not ake indemnity for the goods lost.

5. ARTICLE XXVII. If any vessel of the United States shall be wrecked or stranded on the ast of China, and be subjected to plunder or other damage, the proper ficers of Government, on receiving information of the fact, will immeately adopt measures for their relief and security; and the persons on kard shall receive friendly treatment, and be enabled at once to repair the most convenient of the free ports, and shall enjoy all facilities for btaining supplies of provisions and water. And if a vessel shall be rced, in whatever way, to take refuge in any port other than one of le free ports, then in like manner the persons on board shall receive iendly treatment, and the means of safety and security.

1376. ARTICLE XXVIII.

Citizens of the United States, their vessels and property, shall not be ubject to any embargo; nor shall they be seized or forcibly detained for ny pretense of the public service;. but they shall be suffered to prosecute beir commerce in quiet, and without molestation or embarrassment.

1377. ARTICLE XXIX.

The local authorities of the Chinese Government will cause to be apprelended all mutineers or deserters from on board the vessels of the United States in China, and will deliver them up to the Consuls or other officers br punishment. And if criminals, subjects of China, take refuge in the louses or on board the vessels of citizens of the United States, they shall hot be harbored or concealed, but shall be delivered up to justice on due Equisition by Chinese local officers addressed to those of the United States.

The merchants, seamen, and other citizens of the United States shall be under the superintendence of the appropriate officers of their Govrument. If individuals of either nation commit acts of violence and disorder, use arms to the injury of others, or create disturbances enda gering life, the officers of the two Governments will exert themsels to enforce order, and to maintain the public peace, by doing imparti justice in the premises.

1378. ARTICLE XXX. The superior authorities of the United States and of China, in cort sponding together, shall do so in terms of equality, and in the form mutual communication (chau hwui). The Consuls, and the local officer civil and military, in corresponding together, shall likewise employ t] style and form of mutual communication (chau hwui). When inferii officers of one Government address superior officers of the other, the shall do so in the style and form of memorial (shin chin). Private ind viduals, in addressing superior officers, shall employ the style of petitic (pin ching). In no case shall any terms or style be suffered which sha be offensive or disrespectful to either party. And it is agreed that I presents, under any pretext or form whatever, shall ever be demande of the United States by China, or of China by the United States.

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Treaty concluded June 18, 1858.

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1379. ARTICLE VII.

The superior authorities of the United States and of China, in corri sponding together, shall do so on terms of equality and in form of mutu communication (chau hwui). The Consuls and the local officers, civ and military, in corresponding together shall likewise employ the sty! and form of mutual communication (chau hwui). When inferior of cers of the one Government address superior officers of the other the shall do so in the style and form of memorial (shin chin). Private ind viduals in addressing superior officers, shall employ the style of petitio (pin ching). In no case shall any terms or style be used or suffered whic shall be offensive or disrespectful to either party. And it is agreed tha no presents, under any pretext or form whatever, shall ever be demande of the United States by China, or of China by the United States.

1380. ARTICLE VIII. In all future personal intercourse between the representative of th United States of America and the governors-general or governors, th

terviews shall be had at the official residence of the said officers, or at leir temporary residence, or at the residence of the representative of le United States of America, whichever may be agreed upon between lem; nor shall they make any pretext for declining these interviews. urrent matters shall be discussed by correspondence, so as not to give je trouble of a personal meeting.

1381. ARTICLE IX. Whenever national vessels of the United States of America, in cruising long the coast and among the ports opened for trade for the protection f the commerce of their country or for the advancement of science, hall arrive at or near any of the ports of China, commanders of said hips and the superior local authorities of Government shall, if it be necssary, hold intercourse on terms of equality and courtesy, in token of he friendly relations of their respective nations; and the said vessels hall enjoy all suitable facilities on the part of the Chinese Government in procuring provisions or other supplies and making necessary repairs. Ind the United States of America agree that in case of the shipwreck f any American vessel, and its being pillaged by pirates, or in case any Åmerican vessel shall be pillaged or captured by pirates on the seas Mjacent to the coast, without being shipwrecked, the national vessels of the United States shall pursue the said pirates, and if captured deliver them over for trial and punishment.

1382. ARTICLE X. The United States of America shall have the right to appoint Consuls and other Commercial Agents for the protection of trade, to reside at such places in the dominions of China as shall be agreed to be opened; who shall hold official intercourse and correspondence with the local officers of the Chinese Government (a Consul or Vice-Consul in charge taking rank with an intendant of circuit or prefect), either personally or in writing, as occasions may require, on terms of equality and reciprocal respect. And the Consuls and local officers shall employ the style of mutual communication. If the officers of either nation are disrespectfully treated or aggrieved in any way by the other authorities, they have the right to make representation of the same to the superior officers of the respective Governments, who shall see that full inquiry and strict justice shall be had in the premises. And the said Consuls and Agents shall carefully avoid all acts of offense to the officers and people of China. On the arrival of a Consul duly accredited at any port in China,

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