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BULLETIN

WAR DEPARTMENT, No. 12.

WASHINGTON, March 31, 1919. The following instructions, previously published in certain War Department numbered circulars for the month of March, 1919, are published for the information and guidance of all concerned:

Section. Transportation for marine patients in Army hospitals.---Hospital treatment for discharged soldiers --------

II Pay of corporal bugler and bugler, first class -------

III Marking equipment ------Hospital treatment for discharged soldiers-Amendment to Circular No. 121, War Department, 1919.------

I. Transportation for marine patients in Army hospitals.Authority is granted to furnish transportation on Army transportation requests and commutation of rations at the prescribed rate while traveling, where this is necessary, to personnel of the Navy or Marine Corps when discharged from Army hospitals. Such transportation requests will be billed, respectively, to the “Navy Department, Washington, D. C.," or to “The Quartermaster, U. S. Marine Corps, Washington, D. C." When commutation is furnished certified statement thereof, supported by individual receipts of the men concerned, will be rendered to the same offices.

(Cir. No. 112, W. D., 1919—515.2, A. G. 0.] II. Hospital treatment for discharged soldiers.-1. Discharged soldiers are civilians under the law, and in the matter of hospital treatment come under the provisions of paragraph 1459, Army Regulations. However, any soldier who has been honorably discharged since October 6, 1917, for disability incurred in line of duty, and whose present condition is a reactivation of that disability or as consequent upon it, is entitled to hospital or sanatorium care under the provisions of the War Risk Insurance act either in military hospital, if there be room for him, or in local civilian institution.

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2. If the case is one of emergency, the Chief Medical Advisor of the Bureau of War Risk Insurance should be informed by telegraph of the case, giving the name, rank, and organization from which the man was discharged, the character of the disability, and suggestions as to the treatment needed. The nearest representative of the United States Public Health Service should also be notified, as these officials are authorized to take action in such cases. If there be no representative of the Public Health Service in the vicinity, arrangements will be made with local physicians or institutions to take temporary charge of the case.

3. If the case is not one of emergency, the information called for in paragraph 2 should be furnished by letter to the Chief Medical Advisor of the Bureau of War Risk Insurance.

(Cir. No. 121, W. D., 1919—705.12, A. G. O.) III. Pay of corporal bugler and bugler, first class.-Under date of February 20, 1919, the Comptroller of the Treasury decided that a corporal bugler is entitled to the same rate of pay as a corporal of that branch of the service to which assigned, and a bugler, first class, to the same rate of pay now provided for a private, first class.

The grades of corporal bugler and bugler, first class, were established by the act of Congress approved July 9, 1918 (Bul. 43, W. D., 1918), and any enlisted men who have held or now hold these grades and who have been paid a lower rate of pay than that authorized by the decision of the comptroller are entitled to the difference in pay due them.

This difference in pay will be credited the men on next pay rolls or on final pay rolls or final statements if sooner discharged.

(Cir. No. 122, W. D., 1919—242.1, A. G. O.) IV__Marking equipment.—The markings to be applied to individual equipment for the purpose of identification, as prescribed in paragraphs 257 and 295, Army Regulations, are indicated as follows:

1. Bayonet and bolo scabbards and similar articles are marked by means of the steel dies issued with the outfit for marking metal, the letters being placed upon the aluminum bushing at the mouth of the scabbard, a slight interval being left between the company letter and the soldier's company number.

2. Textile articles of equipment are marked by means of a sinall metal tag, with three projecting prongs, which are to be inserted through the fabric and clamped securely over a washer.

3. For piercing the three holes in the fabric through which the prongs of the tag are inserted there will be issued to all organizations who now have a metal-marking outfit, model 1910, a perforating punch. This punch is so manufactured that it has three projecting lips that correspond to the three prongs on the tag. The equipment to be marked is to be placed on a wooden block and three holes punched into the fabric with the perforating punch, after which the tag can be easily inserted. Organizations which now have the metal-marking outfit on hand can, with a few minor changes and by boring an inch and a quarter hole in the container, make a place to carry the new perforating punch. This should be done by some specially designated mechanic with the organization after the punch is issued.

4. The present anvil issued with the marking outfit can be used as a base upon which to mark the tag after three holes, Hinch in diameter, have been bored in one end of the anvil to correspond to the three prongs on the metal tag. Before fastening the tag to the equipment it is to be placed on the anvil and in the space left for this purpose on the tag the company letter and the soldier's company number, with a slight space left between, are to be stamped by means of the steel dies issued with the metal marking outfit.

5. The location of the tags on the equipment should correspond as nearly as possible to the exact position where the equipment was marked by the old stencil method. The tags should not be attached to articles of equipment in the same place, if the stencil was on the inside and did not show. Such places where the stencil was on the inside, the tag should be reversed and shown on the outside, as the appearance of the tag is more desirable than the washer. An example of this is as follows: On the garrison belt for enlisted men the stencil was on the inside and no marking showed. If the tag were placed on the inside of the belt and the prongs pierced the fabric and clamped over the washer, the washer and prongs would show on the outside of the belt, which is not to be desired. The tag should

be placed on the outside of the belt and the washer on the inside, next to the man's uniform.

(Cir. No. 126, W. D., 1919–457.7, A. G. O.) V__Hospital treatment for discharged soldiers-Amendment to Circular No. 121, War Department, 1919.-Circular No. 121, War Department, 1919, is amended as follows: In the last two lines of paragraph 1, strike out the words “either in military hospital, If there be room for him, or in local civilian institution."

(Cir. No. 127, W. D., 1919—705.12, A. G. 0.] BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

PEYTON O. MARCH,

General, Chief of Staf. OFFICIAL: P. C. HARRIS,

The Adjutant General,

WASHINGTON : GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICH: 1913

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