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BULLION PRODUCT OF 1870.

The Denver News estimates the total gold and silver yield of the Ter ritory for 1870, as follows:

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I am obliged to regard this estimate as altogether too high. The article which contained it showed the manner in which each item was calculated; and a revision of the whole, with additional sources of information, for which I am indebted to Mr. Schirmer of the Denver mint, and Mr. Jones, agent of Wells, Fargo & Co. at that place, leads me to substitute the following estimate, as the most accurate which I can obtain:

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The items of northern and southern mines in these estimates refer to the fact that much of the gold gathered in the mines of Park, Lake, and Summit Counties goes out, by the way of Colorado and Cañon Cities, to Pueblo, and thence east without coming to Denver at all. So of the product of the North Park, Snake, and White River mines in Northern and Northwestern Colorado. It finds its way to the line of the Union Pacific Railroad and thence east or west.

The deposits at the Denver branch mint were as follows:

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In the last six months of the year there were 1,144 deposits, of the value of $586,249 93, showing a very gratifying increase in both number and amount.

The following altitudes of noted localities, mostly within the Territory of Colorado, are taken from a pamphlet published by Colonel Baker of Central City. There are differences of a few feet in the determinations of many of these points. Thus, Denver, according to another good authority, has an altitude of 5,387 feet, which may easily be accounted for by supposing the observation to have been taken on the higher part of the town. Since, a third determination, made on the lower bottom of the Platte, at Denver, near the mouth of Cherry Creek, gives 5,303 feet only. Again, Georgetown is sometimes placed at 8,906 feet, a serious difference; and the Berthoud Pass at 11,562 feet, or 213 feet higher than in the table below. In a number of instances, Frémont's original hypsometrical determinations are given for comparison with more modern ones.

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Forty-six miles below Tarryall, on the Platte..

Where the Tarryall road leaves or strikes Fontaine qui Bouille.

Three miles lower down

Junction, North and South Clear Creeks

Idaho, (12 feet above South Clear Creek)
Head of Virginia Cañon.

Consolidated Ditch Office, (Missouri City)

Mouth of Fall River..

Level of Clear Creek at Empire City.
Base of Berthoud's Pass...

Georgetown....

Georgia Pass, (South to Middle Park)

Colorado City, 15 feet above water

Divide between Arkansas and Platte, on road from Colorado City to Denver..

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Tarryall, (South Park)

5,882

6, 226

6, 479

6,515

6, 342 7,554

8,300

8,636

8,821

7,752

8,028

10, 041

9, 842

9, 932

8, 151

8,273

7,794

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292 MINING STATISTICS WEST OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS.

Pike's Peak

Pike's Peak, (Frémont).

Gray's Peak, (Argentine district).

Parry's Peak, (northwest of Empire City, named by General Case)

Mt. Flora, (a detached peak east of Parry's Peak).

6. MIDDLE PARK.

Three-fourths of a mile from summit of Berthoud's Pass, (western slope)
Head of Middle Park

Hot Springs of Grand River, 25 miles from head of Park

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These formidable altitudes are indications of the difficulty of in communication between the different mining districts. Yet the en prise and skill of American engineers are not to be baffled by s obstacles; and it is safe to predict that railway communication, in so form, will, ere long, be extended into the heart of the mountains, say nothing of the plans of sanguine projectors, who talk already penetrating, by this line, to the Salt Lake Valley itself. At prese there are three railroads centering at Denver: the Kansas Pacific, co ing from Kansas City, the Denver Pacific, connecting with the Uni Pacific at Cheyenne, and the Colorado Central, which strikes from De ver into the mountains. The latter road has been completed to Gold City, a distance of about fifteen miles, and was opened for busine with appropriate festivities on the 24th of September, 1870. Anoth road, called the Boulder Valley Railroad, is in process of constructio from a point on the Denver Pacific, about twenty-five miles northe Denver, to the Boulder coal-fields.

It is proposed to continue the Colorado Central to Central City o Georgetown, and some preliminary work has been done in Clear Creek Cañon. But the question of gauge, which has been considerably dis cussed, still remains unsettled. The narrow gauge, which has been employed with excellent economical results in India, Canada, Norway, and elsewhere, would be, it seems to me, just the thing for mountain branch roads, on account of its superior cheapness in construction and operation; but it appears difficult for the Colorado people to give up the idea of a great transcontinental trunk-line. The ambition of the pow erful Kansas Pacific Company seems to point in this direction. A narrow-gauge line beyond Golden City, necessitating transshipments at that place, would be a great local advantage to it, while the continuance of the ordinary gauge to Central and Georgetown would be better for those localities, if its construction and successful operation were feasible. My impression is that Gilpin and Clear Creek Counties will have to choose between the narrow gauge and nothing. Meanwhile, a bold and, perhaps, visionary scheme is said to be connected with the Boulder Valley line. I quote the following statement from a letter to the New York Tribune:

The Kansas Pacific is a powerful corporation, and, properly, it is the line by which the Cotton States are to communicate with California and China; but, unfortunately,

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that sown -vond be a good place for smelting warka, "de Itali opinions on such a prer could be proper long if nothin My, in generi ma the most thorough and alomata juz Hution mates as to the cost of construction and operathon, Hocedutacte amoout of the remain supply of ores, and the moral of to treatment, are of course indispensable. But after all then hunga licen obtained, the assurance of success is not complete. The mod of smelting works and the limited supply of us, as for go ab Concerned will bring about a fierce competition, in which mutual vantages, and even metallurgical skill, may go down factor bencher co ital and shrewder business management. The promotion of the ma may be gradually stimulated by the increased facilitia ad palmtlong but this cannot have an immediate effect, and mens hib Bandalet noth the ability to pay high cash prices for ores, and what is mun import ant-the ability to stop and stand still when prices du mot permit pr able work, will give decisive advantages to some works, while adding, less fortunate in these respects, are forced to follow the lead of rivals, putting prices up or down to get business, not daring to suspent ope rations, lest the suspension should be final, yet finding it equally ruin. ous to go on. I have seen this drama played repeatedly, till the curtain upon a sheriff's sale.

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The success of smelting-works at a distance from the mining districts,

Pike's Peak

Pike's Peak, (Frémont).

Gray's Peak, (Argentine district).

Parry's Peak, (northwest of Empire City, named by General Case)
Mt. Flora, (a detached peak east of Parry's Peak).

6. MIDDLE PARK.

Three-fourths of a mile from summit of Berthoud's Pass, (western slope)
Head of Middle Park

Hot Springs of Grand River, 25 miles from head of Park

North slope of Pike's Peak.

On the range of Berthoud's Pass

7. TIMBER LINE.

Eastern slope of ridge leading to Gray's Peak.
Eastern slope of Mt. Engelmann

Southern slope of Mt. Flora....

On Snowy Range

Mt. Audubon...

Long's Peak.

Wind River Mountains

Feet.

14, 216

14,300

14, 251

13, 133

12,878

10,696

8,690

7,725

12,043

11,816

11, 643

11,578

11,807

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These formidable altitudes are indications of the difficulty of intercommunication between the different mining districts. Yet the enter prise and skill of American engineers are not to be baffled by such obstacles; and it is safe to predict that railway communication, in some form, will, ere long, be extended into the heart of the mountains, to say nothing of the plans of sanguine projectors, who talk already of penetrating, by this line, to the Salt Lake Valley itself. At present there are three railroads centering at Denver: the Kansas Pacific, coming from Kansas City, the Denver Pacific, connecting with the Union Pacific at Cheyenne, and the Colorado Central, which strikes from Denver into the mountains. The latter road has been completed to Golden City, a distance of about fifteen miles, and was opened for business with appropriate festivities on the 24th of September, 1870. Another road, called the Boulder Valley Railroad, is in process of construction from a point on the Denver Pacific, about twenty-five miles north of Denver, to the Boulder coal-fields.

It is proposed to continue the Colorado Central to Central City or Georgetown, and some preliminary work has been done in Clear Creek Cañon. But the question of gauge, which has been considerably discussed, still remains unsettled. The narrow gauge, which has been employed with excellent economical results in India, Canada, Norway, and elsewhere, would be, it seems to me, just the thing for mountain branch roads, on account of its superior cheapness in construction and operation; but it appears difficult for the Colorado people to give up the idea of a great transcontinental trunk-line. The ambition of the pow erful Kansas Pacific Company seems to point in this direction. A narrow-gauge line beyond Golden City, necessitating transshipments at that place, would be a great local advantage to it, while the continuance of the ordinary gauge to Central and Georgetown would be better for those localities, if its construction and successful operation were feasible. My impression is that Gilpin and Clear Creek Counties will have to choose between the narrow gauge and nothing. Meanwhile, a bold and, perhaps, visionary scheme is said to be connected with the Boulder Valley line. I quote the following statement from a letter to the New York Tribune:

The Kansas Pacific is a powerful corporation, and, properly, it is the line by which the Cotton States are to communicate with California and China; but, unfortunately,

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