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ADMINISTRATION.

It is a matter of satisfaction to the commissioner to be able to state that the administration of the several almshouses is not deteriorating. The officials generally are intelligent, zealous, and efficient, and, as a consequence, the management of these almshouses has due regard to the welfare of the poor, as well as that of the taxpayers.

The tables appended to the reports on the several counties will serve to show the general character of the inmates.

Respectfully submitted,

SIMON W. ROSENDALE, Commissioner, Third Judicial District.

ALBANY ALMSHOUSE.

Albany, N. Y.

WILLIAM H. STORRS, Superintendent. (Frequently visited by the commissioner during 1901.) In addition to the regular inspections made during the year by the inspectors of almshouses, this institution was visited by the commissioner, in company with the Superintendent of State and Alien Poor, as well as on other occasions, and its condition observed from time to time.

At the time of the last annual report, important building operations were under way. These have been completed, and, as a result, the almshouse is in better condition than for many years. The new building for work and service is large and well arranged; the hospital is practically a new building; and all of the dormitories have received important repair. In the extension of the hospital, as well as in the older portion, the new floors are in very unsatisfactory condition; the attention of the superintendent has been called thereto, and it is hoped that they will be remedied.

Situated close to the business part of the city of Albany, there is constant inducement for inmates of this almshouse to seek permission to spend the day in the town, but, under the new commissioner, an effort is made to prevent such wandering about the streets. In the past, one great source of trouble has been the facility with which inmates could obtain intoxicants. It required diligent oversight to prevent indulgence, but a determined effort of the new superintendent is directed toward the prevention of this evil.

At the time of the inspection the institution was found clean throughout, all things apparently in order, and the inmates contented.

CENSUS. The census was as follows:

Males.

Total. Number of inmates...

125

191 Children under two years...

0
0

0 Children between two and 16 years..

0
0

0 Number of blind.....

2
2

4 Number of deaf-mutes...

0
0

0 Number of feeble-minded..

8

11 19 Number of idiots.....

0
0

0 Number of epileptics...

0
0

0 persons over 70 years old...

26 25 51

Females.

66

COLUMBIA COUNTY ALMSHOUSE.

Ghent, N. Y.

J. H. RIVENBURGH, Superintendent. (Visited by the commissioner August 31, 1901.) All the buildings of this almshouse are in good repair, and, at the time of inspection by the commissioner, were in excellent condition, well appointed, and the walls well whitened.

There have been no improvements made recently beyond the ordinary casual repairs. The matters of a steam laundry and of electric lighting were considered at a meeting of the board of supervisors, and it is possible that during the year these may be introduced.

The food supplied to the inmates is of good quality and in sufficient quantity. The officials seem to have the interest of the inmates at heart.

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GREENE COUNTY ALMSHOUSE.

Cairo, N. Y.

A. V. DECKER, Keeper. (Visited by the commissioner September 21, 1901.) These buildings are in good condition. Some minor repairs have been made, and others are in progress. The almshouse is lighted by kerosene oil lamps, which are dangerous. The water supply has been improved since the last report; the main supply is now received from the Cairo water works.

While precautions against fire bave been improved, there is still a lack of outside fire escapes. This almshouse has a large number of feeble-minded and defective inmates, there being no less than 13 who are classed as idiotic or feeble-minded, besides 4 blind persons and 3 epileptics. Twenty-seven of the inmates are over seventy years of age.

The food is supplemented by the butter and milk from the dairy, and the inmates gave evidence, by testimony, of having been well cared for.

CENSUS. The census was as follows:

Females. Total. Number of inmates....

45 32 77 Children under two years old. ...

0

0
Children between two and sixteen
years

0
0

0

Males.

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Kingston, N. Y.

Oscar ADDIS, Superintendent. (Visited by the commissioner September 13, 1900.) This is quite an extensive building for a town the size of Kingston. The residence building is of brick, two stories high, with basement and attic. The central part contains the administration and work and service departments and rooms for men. The superintendent's quarters are in the wing to the east, and the women have dormitories upon the main floor of the western wing. The whole second floor in the main building and the western wing are used by the male inmates. Beside this main building there is a two-story detached house for tramps, and two small isolation wards.

There have been no recent improvements. At the time of inspection the premises were found in good order, but the buildings not adequately protected from the danger of fire. There is neither fire hose nor connections. A city hydrant is 500 feet from the building, but the nearest engine house is one mile distant. There are one liquid and 25 dry chemical extinguishers.

As the precautions are not adequate, neither are the means of escape.

There are two exits for men and women from the parts which they occupy, to the main floor. Upon the ends of the second floor occupied by men there are two winding stairways, which, by reason of their spiral form, are unsafe.

The second floor of the tramp house is used as a medical ward for repulsive or infectious male cases. There are also two pest houses for contagious diseases. The other sick are cared for in the ordinary dormitories.

The house throughout was found clean and in excellent order; the food good, well prepared, and in sufficient variety.

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(Visited by the commissioner, September 5, 1901.) This almshouse affords shelter and support to a large number of able-bodied men who ought not to be retained in an almshouse. At the time of inspection the institution was found in fair order and in good repair. Recently an ice house was built, which contains a large cold storage room. This is of brick, and is connected with the kitchen by an inclosed passage.

Although located in the city of Troy, where there are ample facilities for electric lighting, the almshouse depends upon kerosene oil lamps for its light at night. This is one instance of failure to keep up with the times. Another instance is in the matter of laundry appliances. As has been stated before, although Troy is known all over the United States as the home of the steam laundry, this institution continues to do its laundry work by hand. Fortunately, wooden tubs were discarded long

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