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Table showing the number of inmates in the State institutions

subject to the visitation and inspection of the State Board of Charities, October 1, 1901, arranged with reference to the representation from the several counties of the State.

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Albany
Allegany
Broome
Cattaraugus
Cayuga
Chautauqua
Chemung
Chenango
Clinton ...
Columbia
Cortland
Delaware
Dutchess
Erie .......
Essex
Franklin
Fulton ..
Genesee
Greene
Hamilton
Herkimer
Jefferson..
Kings
Lewis
Livingston
Madison....
Monroe
Montgomery
Nassau ..
New York,
Niagara
Oneida
Onondaga.
Ontario
Orange.
Orleans
Oswego
Otsego
Putnam
Queens
Rensselaer
Richmond
Rockland
St. Lawrence
Saratoga
Schenectady
Schoharie
Schuyler.
Seneca
Steuben.
Suffolk,
Sullivan
Tioga
Tompkins.
Ulster
Warren
Washington
Wayne..
Westchester
Wyoming
Yates...
State at large
From other states.

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329 50

83 14 1,350

117 182 234

81 1 77

40 78 46

7 77 154 27 41 112 70 55 13 19 39 180 52 18 62 49

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142 109

or these, 9 were infants. t of these, 6 were infants. Opened May 11, 1901. $ of these, 11 belong to the Allegany Reservation and 56 to the Cattaraugus Reservation. í Tona wanda Reservation.

St. Regls Reservation. It Tuscarora Reservation. It Onelda Reservation. $8 Onondaga Reservation. Shinnecock Reservation. *** Opened to patients December 1, 1900.

STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, ROCHESTER, MONROE COUNTY.

[Established 1846.) This institution has capacity for 900 inmates. At the beginning of the fiscal year there were present 670 boys and 114 girls; total, 784. During the year 544 boys and 64 girls were admitted and 467 boys and 72 girls discharged, leaving a population, October 1, 1901, of 747 boys and 106 girls; total, 853—an increase of 69. The average number of inmates during the year was 827, and the average weekly cost of support, including the value of home and farm products consumed, $4.18; excluding the value of home and farm products consumed, $4.15.

The receipts during the fiscal year were: From cash on hand at the beginning of the year, $779.48; from special appropriations, $1,030.51; from general appropriations, $179,500; from other sources, $415.20; making the total receipts for the year, $181,725.19.

The ordinary expenditures were: For salaries of officers, $16,419.78; for wages and labor, $61,732.45; for provisions, $39,503.83; for household stores, $4,144.90; for clothing, $7,827.57; for fuel and light, $24,195.62; for hospital and medical supplies, $1,406.49; for transportation and traveling expenses, $2,624.29; for shop, farm and garden supplies, $10,227.43; for ordinary repairs, $2,204.34; for expenses of managers, $711.35; returned to State Treasurer, $415.20; for unclassified expenses, $8,106.18; total, $179,519.43.

The extraordinary expenditures were $1,239.80, making the aggregate expenditures for the year, $180,759.23, and leaving, October 1, 1901, a cash balance of $965.96.

The outstanding indebtedness was $605.80, of which $209.33 was due for salaries of officers and employes and $396.47 for bills unpaid. The balance in cash was the only asset.

Of the ordinary expenditures during the year, 43.6 per cent. was for salaries, wages and labor; 22.1 per cent. for provisions; 2.3 per cent. for household stores; 4.4 per cent. for clothing; 13.5 per cent. for fuel and light; .8 of 1 per cent. for hospital and medical supplies; 1.5 per cent. for transportation and traveling ex: penses; 5.7 per cent. for shop, farm and garden supplies; 1.2 per cent. for ordinary repairs; .4 of 1 per cent. for expenses of managers, and 4.5 per cent. for all other ordinary expenses.

Chapter 644, Laws of 1901 (appropriation bill), appropriated for maintenance, rewards to inmates, repairs and betterments of tools, equipment and furniture, for repairs to buildings, for tools to conduct the trades-schools and common schools for military system and photographing inmates, $175,000.

This institution has presented no new questions for considera. tion during the past year. The ordinary discipline has continued without interruption. The technical sections, schools and other departments have been conducted along the same lines as during the past two or three years. Some changes are held in abeyance pending the proposed removal of the institution to a new location. The removal to the country will enable the School to provide for instruction in general farming, horticulture, floriculture and similar pursuits, and secure the separation of boys and girls. The change to a rural location is not only absolutely demanded for hygienic and other reasons, but it is necessary to meet the requirements of modern reformatory methods. The change has been urged heretofore by the State Board of Charities, and it is hoped that the Legislature during this session will make the necessary appropriation and grant authority to purchase a suitable farm in the vicinity of Rochester upon which to locate the School. As the land now occupied by the institution is valuable for city purposes, the proceeds of its sale should be sufficient to purchase a suitable farm, as well as provide for the erection and equipment of well-arranged buildings thereon for the boys.

It is believed that public opinion in Rochester favors the removal of the institution. This is evidenced by resolutions adopted by public bodies in that city. The Board of Managers of the institution believes the change should be accomplished. A suitable location has been agreed upon by the commission appointed under chapter 167 of the laws of 1899, which was authorized to select a new site for the institution, and action by the Legislature is necessary to secure the removal desired and recommended by this Board, as in accordance with the most enlightened public sentiment. The Board recommends the sale of the valuable site occupied by this School in the city of Rochester and the purchase of a farm site in the country to which it shall be removed.

The State Industrial School is intended for the reformation of juvenile delinquents, and through reformation to save to the Commonwealth those who would otherwise swell the ranks of criminals and paupers. The School is for the training of those sent to it, in habits of industry, morality and usefulness, and its equipment should be ample to carry on its special work in the

best manner.

As this is a school, not a prison, it must be prepared to train boys and girls for self-support. Its trades-schools should cover the field of ordinary profitable industries, and in addition provide scholastic training at least equal to that within the reach of youth living at home. The principal stress should be laid upon industrial training, and this requires facilities for manual and technical work. The boys should be thoroughly instructed so as to be capable of earning a good livelihood at a trade. It is not sufficient to give them a part of a trade; they should be under instruction long enough and have sufficient opportunity to master the trade in all its parts. This will make them skillful workmen, not afraid of competition, and acceptable to employers of labor. The industrial department of this institution should turnout finished workmen, and its facilities need to be increased to

that end.

The Board recommends the following appropriations, or so much thereof as may be necessary, to this institution:

For improving economy of steam and electric plants and for pipe covering, $2,500; maintenance appropriation, $180,000; making the total appropriations, $182,500.

HOUSE OF REFUGE FOR WOMEN, HUDSON, COLUMBIA COUNTY.

(Established 1881.] This institution has capacity for 311 inmates. The number of inmates October 1, 1900, was 268, and 79 were admitted and returned during the year, making the total number under care 347. During the year 25 were paroled to service, 2 died and 97 were discharged, thus leaving under care October 1, 1901, 223, of whom 9 were infants. The average number present during the year was 243, and the average weekly cost of support, including the value of home and farm products consumed, $4.97; excluding the value of home and farm products consumed, $4.86.

The receipts during the fiscal year ending September 30, 1901, were: From cash balance of the previous year, $480.01; from special appropriations, $11,246.63; from general appropriations, $62,000; from other sources, $238.98; total, $73,965.62.

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