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that but three schools have given any serious efforts to this important subject.

Appropriations were made by the Legislature of 1901 for addi. tions to the buildings at the Malone school and for improvements at the Rome school.

In connection with the fact that the most notable increase in attendance at any one school is at Albany, the Board calls atten. tion to the very crowded condition of the building occupied and its dangerous construction.

There should be some action looking towards the adoption of a uniform system for keeping the accounts in the several schools. It is found that the financial records at the Malone school, approach what would seem an ideal set of books in adaptability to every need of a large or small population, and which are simple and easily kept. Similar books are in use in each of the State charitable institutions. Very respectfully submitted,

JOHN NOTMAN,

Chairman Committee on the Deaf. Dated Albany, October 26, 1901.

REPORT

ON

Thomas Asylum for Orphan and Destitute

Indian Children.

REPORT.

To the State Board of Charities:

Your Committee on the Thomas Asylum for Orphan and Destitute Indian Children reports as follows:

This institution has been regularly inspected at frequent intervals during the past year. The Inspector of State Charitable Institutions noted the condition of the asylum, and the methods of administration as observed by him at different times. His reports were carefully examined by your committee, and, together with personal observation, are made the basis of this report. In addition to the regular inspections, your committee, accompanied by the Superintendent of State and Alien Poor, Mr. Byron M. Child, and Dr. Robert W. Hill, Inspector of the Board, · made a special inspection of the asylum, and examined into its needs and work.

This institution is the only one of the kind in the State of New York. From a small beginning, as a purely private charity, it has grown to large importance as a State institution, and become a decided influence for the betterment of the remnants of Indian tribes resident in the State. According to the latest report there are now 5,265 Indians on reservations containing 87,677 acres, which are located in this State. The number seems to remain about the same as it has been for many years, which is an indication that with favorable environment the Indians can maintain themselves in association with the whites. It is true that the transition from barbarism to civilization has been slow and fraught with many perils to the red race, but out of them all there survives a people which has assimilated many of

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