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Legislature has attempted to delegate powers possessed by it, and so the line of authorities cited to establish the proposition that the Legislature cannot delegate its powers do not apply. The Constitution itself provides, in section 14 of article 8: “No such payments” (that is, payments of public moneys to charitable, eleemosynary, correctional and reformatory institutions), "shall be made for any inmate of such institution who is not received and retained therein pursuant to rules established by the State Board of Charities.” That is the direct and controlling mandate of the Constitution of supreme authority over the courts no less than executive officers. In discussing that sec. tion of the Constitution, the Court of Appeals said, in People ex rel. Inebriates' Home v. Comptroller, 152 N. Y. 407: “We entertain no doubt that this prohibition operated presently; that is to say, that from the time rules should be established by the State Board regulating the reception and retention by charitable institutions, no payments would be justified for the care, support and maintenance of inmates received or retained in contravention of the rules of the Board.” Again the same court said, in People ex rel. X. Y. Inst. for Blind v. Fitch, 154 N. Y. 15: “ This declaration of the organic law is plain and unambiguous and expressly forbids the appropriation of money by the counties and cities of the State, unless the inmates are received and retained in the manner stated. Its manifest purpose is to make all appropriations of public moneys by the local political divisions or municipalities of the State to insti. tutions under private control subject to the supervision and rules of the State Board of Charities." While it is true that the precise point involved in the matter at bar was not before the court in either of the cases cited, still, as the expression of the opinion of the court of last resort discussing the general purposes of the new constitutional provisions applicable to the case now here, I must regard said cases as controlling on this motion. The evil aimed at by the constitutional convention and by the people in accepting its work is the precise evil sought to be perpetuated by this petitioner in this proceeding; namely, compelling public funds to be expended for inmates of private institutions without any examination by public authorities as to the necessity therefor. This, the Constitution says, shall not be done. Motion denied. Ten dollars costs.

This decision has been affirmed by the Appellate Division in the First Department, to which it was carried on appeal.

STATISTICS OF OUTDOOR RELIEF.

For the first time in the history of the State, so far as known to the State Board of Charities, the Board last year succeeded in collecting through the county superintendents of the poor and other like officials, statistics of outdoor relief from nearly every town and city in the State, as well as from the counties as a whole as heretofore. These statistics cover the year ending September 30, 1900, and are published in the statistical appendix to the Board's report to the Legislature of 1901. They show such great relative differences in the number relieved and in the amount expended for relief in the various localities of the State, and especially in the cities as will be seen by the following table for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1900 (and also for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1901, the statistics for which have since been collected), as to make careful examination on the part of the local authorities seem desirable, in order to make sure on the one hand that the poor are being properly relieved and on the other that pauperism is not in some cases being encouraged by the relieving officers:

25

OUTDOOR RELIEF IN CITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1900.

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New York..

New York... Buffalo

Erie Rochester

Monroe Syracuse

Onondaga. Albany

Albany Troy

Repaselaer. Utica

Oneida. Yonkers

Westchester Binghamton

Broome. Elmira

Chemung Schenectady Schenectady A uburn

Cayuga. Newburgh..

Orange Kingston

Ulster Poughkeepsie Dutchess Cohoes

Albany Jamestown

Chautauqua Oswego....

Oswego. Watertown

Jefferson Amsterdam

Montgomery Mount Vernon. Westebester Niagara Fatls.

Niagara
Gloversville

Fulton
Lockport

Niagara
Rome

Oneida
New Rochelle Westchester
Middletown.

Orange
Watervliet.

Albany
Ithaca

Tompkins
Ogdensburg

St. Lawrence
Horbellsville Steuben
Dunkirk...

Chautauqua
Corning

Steuben
Genera

*1,038 12.034 7,642 1,353 3,508 1,614 1,843

327 1,449

935

209
1,854
1,052
2,127

8!4
2-6

436
1,089

1 2,571

350 2.6 430 163 441 312

3,437,202

352.387
162, 608
108,374
94,151
60, 651
56,383
47,931
39,647
35, 672
31 682
30.345
24,943
24,535
21.029
23,910
22,892
22,199
21,696
20,929
20,346
19,457
18,349
16,581
15,343
14,720
14.522
14,321
13,136
12,633
11,918
11,616
11.062
10, 133
10,381
10,130
9,528
9, 462
9 069
0,011
7,466

.08 .20

.0003 1310,221 00 .034 63,748 10 .047 78,340 51 .010

29,483 29 .037 9,595 34 .0:7 16.146 54 .033 6,6-8 63

3.326 14 037

16.263 48 .026 4.199 OU .006 5,817 15 .061 15,904 60 .042 7,529 05 .087 7,781 94 .034 3,884 39 .012

6,187 75

12,427 27 .049

8,504 47 1

2,537 01 .123

15,562 00 .017 1,732 46 .012 3,884 26 .023 5,014 90 .010

1,683 57 .029 3.623 13 .021 1,40% 28 .008

.27 .10 .24

.10

6 05 4 95 17 19 11 66 10 33 8 22 4 51 27 05

.42 .28 .12 .37 .64

.28

Ontario Little Falls

Herkimer. Jobnstown

Fulton.. Hudson .....

Columbia Olean

Cattaraugus North Tonawanda. Niagara Cortland

Cortland Rensselaer..

Rensselaer.

121 1,750

360 576 161 170 115 427 $ 317 360 108

3,272 61 .122 2,863 63 .030

5,738 68
.046 5.306 79
.014 3,293 80
.015 1,373 85
.010 4.124 65
.011 6,708 04

$
.031 2.811 55
.038 2.064 90
.011 3,169 08
$

$
.018

2.200 68 .017 1,874 84

1 6+ 15 94

9 21 20 46

8 08 35 87 15 71

.23 .20

8 96 5 74 29 31

22 .33 s .24 25

166
129

13 26
14 53

* Of this pumber, 600 were blind persons and 138 G. A. R. veterans.
f of his amount, $30,000 was for blind persons and $10,221 for veterans.

Vo statistics.
Yo report.

OUTDOOR RELIEF IN CITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1901.

CITY.

COUNTY

Population by cen

808 of 1900,

Number temporarily

relieved.

Per capita expense

for entire number
relieved.

Per capita expense

for entire population.

01 .14 .47 .28 .08 .28 .14

.07

.43

.07

.22 .55 .26 .28 .21

.14

New York. Buffalo Rochester Syracuse Albiny Troy. Utica Yonkers Binghamton Elmira Schenectady Auburn.. Newburgh Kingston Pouglıkeepsie Coboes Jamestown Oswego Watertown Amsterdam Mount Vernon Niagara Falls Gloversville Lock port Rome New Rochelle.. Middletown.. Watervliet Ithaca Oudersburg Hornell-ville Dunkirk Corning Geneva Little Falls Jobnstown Hud-on ...... Olean North Tonawanda.. Cortland Oneida Rensselaer.

New York Erie Monroe Onondaga Albany Rensselaer Oneida Westchester. Broome Chemung Schenectady Caruga Orange.. Ulster Dutchess Albany Chautauqua Oswego Jefferson Montgomery Westchester. Niagara.. Fulton Niagara.. Oneida Westchester Orange Albany Tompkins St. Lawrence Steuben Chantauqua Sieuben Ontario. Herkimer Fulton... Columbia Cattaraugus Niagara Cortland Madison Rensselaer

3,437,202
352,387
162,608
108,374
94,151
60,651
56,3-3
47,931
39,617
35,672
31,682
30,345
24,943
24,535
24,029
23,910
22,892
22,199
21,696
20,929
20,346
19.457
18,319
16,581
15,343
11,720
14,522
14,321
13,136
12,633
11.918
11,616
11,061
10,133
10,381
10,130
9,5.8
9,46
9,063
9,014
7,533
7,466

*1,161
7,587
9,500
3,037
3,212
1,665
2,226

342
1,309

535

234 1,627

809
2,742

915
123
498
899 )

410
2,090

319 509 508 1901 481 332 407 618 249 626 148

98 126 279 839 472 431

$37 24

6 34 7 98 9 76 2 29 10 13 3 59 9 33 12 88

4 78 29 91 10 21 7 12 2 54 5 55 27 13 22 16 9 29 7 92 8 03 11 97 11 62 9 59 8 25 5 75 5 41 7 91 4 19 12 11 12 18 26 23

8 40 36 05 21 94 7 02 941 6 30 82 68 18 82 16 95

.48 .38 .15 .80 .21 .34 .27 .09 .18 .12 .22 .20 .23 .60 .33

.07

.59 57

.28

Percentage of popu.

lation relieved.

for Expenditures

temporary relief.

66 112

85
309
37

.0003 $13,239 84
.022 48,101 32
.058 75, 775 00
.028 29,829 21
.034 7,369 35
.027

16,466 00
.039 7.993 55
.007 3,192 00
.033 16,805 43
.015 2,557 03
.007 7,000 00
.051 16,607 13
.035 6, 146 17
.110 6,975 83
.038

5,075 98 .005 3,336 92 .022

11,034 32 .010 8,349 23 .019 3,245 81 .100 16,776 42 012

4,176 03 .029 6,612 70 .028 4,873 34 .011 1,567 63 .032 2,781 69

1,798 001 .028 3,218 50 .045

2,713 48 .019 3,015 49 .049 7,628 31 .012 3,881 92 .008

823 64 .011 4,512 20 .027

6,120 35 .080

5,888 83 .046 4,441 48 .045

2,714 16 .007

5,457 13 .012

2,108 46 .009

1,441 19 .010

2,497 63 .005

1,306 25

8 08 35 30

.023

.58 .23

.16 .33 .18

* Of this number, 672 were blind persons and 489 G. A. R. veterans.
+ Of this amount, $33,243.81 was for blind persons and $9,996 for veterans.

THE DESIRABILITY OF COLLECTING AND TABULATING IN

ACCESSIBLE FORM SCIENTIFIC AND OTHER DATA WITH
RELATION TO THE INMATES OF THE STATE INSTITU-
TIONS.

For some time the Board has been impressed with the desirability of securing the collection, in accessible form and for practical uses, of scientific and other data with relation to the inmates of some of the State institutions.

In the Board's opinion a system of records, uniform so far as practicable, should be devised and put into use for the purpose of keeping a complete record of all desirable information with relation to the inmates of the various State charitable and reformatory institutions, the latter especially, in order that the history of each individual inmate and the results of his or her care and treatment at the institutions, or while on parole, may be clearly traced. In no other way does it seem possible to estimate with any approach towards accuracy the real value of the work accomplished by the institutions, the extent to which their training is put to practical use, and the number whose cure or reformation is actually accomplished.

A State which is spending millions of dollars annually for the care of the dependent and the delinquent classes should be willing to spend a few thousand dollars more to measure the results of its work. At the present time, so far as most of the institutions are concerned, too much must be taken for granted.

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