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XIV. METEOROLOGICAL TABLE FOR BLOOMINGTON, IA.

For the Year 1843; by Mr. T. S. Parvin.

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Range.
8 Mean

Maximum.
beste height.

A cs/ Snow.

50w Southwest.

Vom Hg. Wind.

.38

.60

January,
24.9 50 -15 65 29.27 29.6028.80.80 11 12 8

4 17 10 23
February,
13.3 45 -1964

.80.80 14 10 4 1 4 3 2 20 3 16 12 Marchi,

15.5 38.-1048 .34 .60 .90 .70 19 10 2 6 6 6 18 1 18 13 April,

47.7 781 5 73 .33 .60 .80.80 17 9 4 7 1 211 12 5 14 16 May,

58.2 88 27 61 .31 .60 .201.40 19 6 6 9 3 S 10 10 17 14 June,

67.7 90 40 50 .26 .50 .90 .60 15 411 7 1 9 10 10 20 10 July,

70.4 95 55 40 .41 .70 .10 .60 25 66 5 8 14 4 24 7 August, 70.6 94 46 48 .39 .60 .20 40 20 3 87 3 10 14

8 September, 61.5 92 45 47 .35

.701.00 12 9 912 12 10 8 20 10 October, 42.1 84 12 72 .60 .90 .70 20 3 8 4 4 2 6 9 14 16

15 November, 34 0 56 10 46 .38 .70 .20 1.50 7 16 7 5 6 3 9 14 41 24 6 December, 31.9 54 s! 46 .31 .80 29.00 80 14 14 3 5 2 3 6 16 6 21 10 Year,

45.0 95-19 114 29.3429.63 29.621.01 (193 96 766526 3191164 179 236 129

4 23

.70

.39

The warmest day in the year, was July 16th ; 83° 3' above 0.
The coldest day was February 6th ; 6° 3' below 0.
The highest temperature, was July 15th; 95° above 0.
The lowest temperature, was February 7th; 19° below 0.
Mean temperature for the year, 45° 06'.
Range of temperature, for the year, 114o.
Mississippi river opened, April Sth.

XV. FLOWERING OF FRUIT TREES.

Place.
Year. Peach. Cherry.

Apple.
Cambridge, Mass., 1844 April 27–30. April 27–30. May 4–12.
New Haven, Conn., 1844 ) April 25.

April 25.

May 7. Perth Amboy, N. J., 1844 April 15.

April 17. April 26. Trenton, N. J.,

1844 April 13. April 14. April 24. Lambertville, N. J., 1844 April 14. April 17. April 19. Philadelphia, Penn., 1844 April 8.

April 11. April 14. Baltimore, Md., 1844 April 10. April 12. April 15. King Geo., C, H, Va., 1844 April 7. April 10. April 15. Augusta, Ga.,

1844 Feb. 26. Almond trees, Feb. 17. Natchez, Miss. 1844 | Jan. 28.

March 24. Columbus, Ohio, 1844 * April 10. April 13. April 16. Madison, Wisc. Ter., 1844 ' April 15.

April 26. * Twenty or thirty days later than usual.

XVI. FLOWERING OF PLANTS AT MARIETTA, Ohio,

For the Year 1843. By S. P. Hildreth, M. D. April 1st, crocus in bloom; 2d, crown imperial, two inches high ; 3d, snow fell two inches deep ; 4th, blackbird and martin appear; 8th, snowdrop in bloom; 14th, Hepatica triloba; 19th, early hyacinth; 20th, Aronia botryapium, or Juneberry; 21st, crown imperial ; 22d, Sanguinaria Canadensis; 23d, hyacinth; 24th, peach tree begins to open its flowers on the sunny side of hills, but not in low grounds; 25th, wood anemone; 26th, fumitory and birthwort; 27th, peach in bloom generally — last year it opened on the 19th of March, a difference of thirty-eight days; 29th, plum in bloom. On the morning of the 25th, there was a frost, but not so hard as to injure the blossoms of the peach.

May 1st, pear and cherry in bloom; 5th, apple in blossom — last year it was open on the 2d of April, a difference of thirty-three days; a few tu. lips of the early varieties open ; 6th, red-bud in bloom - this fine flowering tree usually opens at the same time with the apple ; 7th, Cornus flor. ida; Sth, white oak putting out its leaves — the old Indian rule for planting their corn, which was probably founded on ancient observation, that before that period, the earth was not sufficiently warmed for the corn to vegetate in a healthy manner; 9th, apple shedding its blossoms; 13th, quince tree in bloom; 16th, purple mulberry; 17th, Calceolaria lutea ; 18th, hickory; 19th, black walnut shedding its aments; 22d, Ribes villosus; 24th, Acacia robinia - this is a very cautious tree, and never puts out its bloom till all danger from late frosts is past; 25th, Prunus Virginianus ; 27th, rose Acacia, in gardens; 30th, white Chinese peony.

The mean temperature for the summer months was 71°15, which is 30:71 above the summer of 1842. The amount of rain in these months, was only 7:45 inches, while in the former year it was 15-75 inches. June 2d, there was a smart frost in the morning, but not so hard as to destroy the young and tender fruit of pears, apples, &c., it being protected by the shelter, and by the radiation of caloric from the leaves. 7th, Osage orange in bloom; 8th, peas fit for the table in ordinary years they are ready by the 20th of May. 9th, strawberries ripe ; 11th, various hardy roses in bloom; 18th, Franklinia ; 23d, cucumbers ready for eat. ing — grown in the open air, but protected when small by a box, like a hand glass ; 26th, Sambucus in bloom ; 27th, purple mulberry ripe ; 29th, red Antwerp raspberry and currant; July 1st, Catalpa in bloom. The ripening of the early summer fruits is not so much retarded by the action of a cold spring, as the blooming of flowers.

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UNITED STATES.

I. EXECUTIVE GOVERNMENT.

The 14th Presidential term of four years, since the establishment of the government of the United States, under the Constitution, began on the 4th of March, 1841; and it will expire on the 3d of March, 1845.

Salary. JOHN TYLER, of Virginia,

President,

$25,000 Vacancy,

Vice President. 5,000

General William Henry Harrison, of Ohio, having been elected by a majority of 174 of the electoral votes, was, on the 4th of March, 1841, inaugurated President of the United States, in the city of Washington, and died on the 4th of the succeeding April. In consequence of this event, the duties of the office have devolved on John Tyler, of Virginia, who had been elected by the same majority Vice President; in accordance with the provision of the Constitution of the United States, which says: “In case of the removal of the President from office, or of his death, resignation, or inability to discharge the powers and duties of said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice President."

THE CABINET.

The following are the principal officers in the executive department of the government, who form the Cabinet, and who hold their offices at the will of the President.

Salary. John C. Calhoun, South Carolina, Secretary of State, $6,000 George M. Bibb, Kentucky, Secretary of the Treasury, 6,000 William Wilkins, Pennsylvania, Secretary of War, 6,000 John Y. Mason, Virginia, Secretary of the Navy, 6,000 Charles A. Wickliffe, Kentucky, Postmaster General, 6,000 John Nelson, Maryland, Attorney General,

4,000

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