Gambar halaman
PDF
ePub

The following is a transcript of the inscription on the monument of Richard Owen of Peniarth, Esq., and Elizabeth his wife, in the chancel, Llanegryn Church, county of Merioneth.

Underneath is interred
RICHARD OWEN, of Peniarth, Esq.,
Whose judgement, knowledge,
and other accomplishments, were
often eclipsed by his modesty;
yet always approved when he
discharged the duty of a Magistrate,
and gained the greater
respect because his clemency
less demanded it.
Prosperity and Power,
that allure most to Excess, Pride,
and Oppression,
render'd him the more admired,
for his Frugality and great Condescension,
Justice, Charity, and Devotion.
Though he minded his own affairs,
and never pry’d into the concerns of
others,
however, in an honest way, he readily
served his friends, and so as to
deserve no enemies; being
easy of access and affable,
sincere, inoffensive, and hospitable.
Thus while he lived, he was justly
well beloved, and since his death
is very much bemoaned.
He married
Mrs. Elizabeth Pughe,
eldest daughter and heir to
Humphrey Pughe,
f

o
Aberffrydlan,
Esq.,
by whom he had issue
his only son,
Lewis Owen,
now of Peniarth,

[ocr errors]

and departed this life,
March 24, 1713-14,

Aged 56.
Out of a pious esteem to his

memory, this monument was erected by his above-mentioned mournful

relict;
who dy'd Obr. 1st, 1738,

Aged 77, a Lady eminent for her piety, abstinence, and charity, whose conduct in every scene of life, from the first of her

days to the last, was consistent with the strictest honour and

virtue.

NOTE OF GRANT OF POSSESSIONS OF THE

PRIORY OF CHIRBURY,

TO SIR THOMAS MIDDLETON, KNIGHT.

(Calendar Patent Rolls, Vol. 61, p. 333. Vicessima Secunda Pars 10, J.)

MONTGOMERY.

Tho. Midleton, Militis.
Fforden

Capella cum pertinentiis.
Magna henne alias Hem
Parva henne alias Hem

Decimas garbarum et Kelekewith

feni et alias decimas Ffording alias Horden

commoditates tantas et Nantcreba alias Nant Criba proficuos eidem Capelle Penylan

pertinentes. Brinkewdrithe Cackley alias Hackley et

Possessiones Prioris de Hett in Winwarthe.

Chirbury Montgomery et Salopp... Churchstok Capella cum pertinenciis. Churchstok

Brampton alias Hirdeley alias Hurdeley

Brampton Weston Maddock

Hopton et Ext. Gwirlo alias Gwerlo alias Riston Bacheldre alias Melington alias Milington.

Barheldre. Possessiones Edmundi Downeing et Petri Ashton ante

priorem de Chirbury.

Montgomery.

Llanvaire.........Rectoria cum pertinentibus

possessiones Monasterii de Llan ligan. Habendum sibi et heredibus, Tenendum in Socagio.

HISTORIC SPOTS.

No. v.-CEFN DIGOLL, (OR DIGOLL VYNYDD, MYNYDD HIR, THE LONG MOUNTAIN.)

BY THE Rev. GEORGE SANDFORD, M.A.

CEFN DIGOLL, or the Long Mountain, about five miles from Montgomery, extends along the eastern border of Montgomeryshire from Chirbury to Alberbury, Co. Salop, and is an historic name intimately associated with the annals of Wales.

Probably the earliest historical reference to this locality is to be found in the “Stanzas on the Graves of the Warriors of the Isle of Britain” (Myv. Arch.), where three warriors, whose achievements are now forgotten, are stated to have been buried here:

“The graves in the Long Mountain-
Multitudes well know it-
Are the graves of Gwrien Gwryd,

Engwawd, and Llwyddawg, son of Lliwelydd.” There is also in the “ Mabinogion” (vol. ii, pp. 379, 403), the following interesting allusion to Cefn Digoll:

“And thence Iddawe took Rhonabwg behind him on his horse, and that mighty host moved forward, each troop in its order towards Cefn Digoll.”

Llywarch Hen, in his “ Englynion y Gorwynion” (Stanzas on the Coruscants), also refers to it thus :

Very glittering are the bazel tops by the hill of Digoll;
Every prudent one will be free from harm;

"Tis the act of the mighty to keep a treaty.” Here, also, occurred many a desperate fight between the Welsh under Cadwallon and their Saxon invaders

in the seventh century. Llywarch Hen, whom we have already quoted, records that

“The army of Cadwallon, the illustrious,

Encamped on the top of the Mount of Digoll,

For seven months, and seven skirmishes daily." The struggle culminated in that fierce and terrible conflict between Cadwallon and Edwin, King of Northumberland, which caused one of the three discolourings of the Severn recorded in the Triads, when that river was crimsoned with blood nearly from its source to its estuary. Besides this mountain, too, the genial hospitality of Owen Cyfeiliog, Prince of Upper Powys, celebrated in the bardic lays of Cynddelw, was freely dispensed.

“ Yonder Digoll's hill beside,

Owain's frequent horn' goes round,

[blocks in formation]

Lo! the chieftain's sparkling store,

Circles ’neath the moonlight beam !
Proud though Hirvryn's? eagles soar,

Prouder we near Havren's stream."'S On this eminence, also, Owen Tudor, Earl of Richmond, afterwards Henry the Seventh, mustered the adherents who had undertaken to join his banner from North Wales and Shropshire; and not one failed of his promise, so that the mountain acquired a fresh title to its ancient name Digoll, "without fail”.

But Cefn Digoll chiefly interests us as being the scene of the discomfiture and capture of Madoc, the last champion of the nationality of Gwynedd ; and on its summit, 1330 feet above the level of the sea, are the remains of an ancient encampment, called the Beacon Ring, the site of the disastrous conflict of the Welsh with Edward the First. English chronicles and records supply the scantiest material for ascertaining

1 The “Hirlas," or drinking horn.
2 "Hirvryn," the long mountain.
3 Er. inf. Richard Williams, Esq., Newtown.

« SebelumnyaLanjutkan »