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ANNUAL INCOME FROM SALARIES AND WAGES

1938-1943 (in current dollars os poid) 2400

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FACTORY WORKERS 1200 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942

1943 Sources Teachers ( teachers, principals, and supervisors) from U.S. Office of Education and NE A Research Division Federal and toctory employees (salaried and woge-corning ) from Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, US Dept. of Commerce.

Res Div, Not Educ. Assn.

PURCHASING POWER OF AVERAGE SALARIES

AND WAGES, 1938 1943

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Sources Teachers (teachers, principals, and supervisors) from U.S. Office of Education and NE A Research Division.
Federal and foctory employees (salaried and woge-earning) from Buroou of Foreign and Domestic Commerce,
U.S. Dept. of Commerce.

Res Div. Ne idu Aisn

INDEXES OF WAGE RATES, TEACHERS' SALARIES,

AND LIVING COSTS 180

170

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145

140

135

130

125

120

115

110

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105

100

90

80

75

65

60

50

45

40

35

1913 1915 1920 1925 1930 1935 1940 1943 Source: US Department of Lobor, U. S. Department of Agriculture, and U.S. office of Education Res. Div., Nor. Educ. Assn.

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AVERAGE SALARY OF ALL PUBLIC -SCHOOL TEACHERS, SUPERVISORS, AND PRINCIPALS, 1941-42 $1000

$ 2500 $3000

$500

$1500

$ 2000

NEW YORK
CALIFORNIA
NEW JERSEY
MASSACHUSETTS
CONNECTICUT
WASHINGTON
RHODE ISLAND
ILLINOIS
OHIO
DELAWARE
PENNSYLVANIA
MARYLANC
MICHIGAN
ARIZONA
NEVADA
INDIANA
UTAH
OREGON
WISCONSIN
COLORADO
NEW HAMPSHIRE
MINNESOTA
WEST VIRGINIA
MONTANA
MISSOURI
NEW MEXICO
WYOMING
FLORIDA
OKLAHOMA
IDAHO
TEXAS
LOUISIANA
10WA
KANSAS
NORTH CAROLINA
VERMONT
MAINE
VIRGINIA
KENTUCKY
TENNESSEE
NEBRASKA
SOUTH DAKOTA
SOUTH CAROLINA
GEORGIA
ALABAMA
NORTH DAKOTA
ARKANSAS
MISSISSIPPI

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Bosed on preliminory doto for 1941-42 from the United States Oltice of Education,

SALARIES PAID TO PUBLIC SCHOOL CLASSROOM TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS, SUPERVISORS, AND SUPERINTENDENTS, 1942-43

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what they will have in nonteaching professions—it will influence their decision very much.

Senator ELLENDER. That will be an incentive, I understand, but the question is whether or not under the bill as drafted some of the money could be used for the purposes you indicated.

Dr. HUBBARD. As I understand it, it could be under the emergency part of the bill particularly.

Senator ELLENDER. Are there any questions?

Senator AIKEN. I would like to ask one question. To what extent are the men who left the teaching profession to enter the armed services returning to the teaching profession?

Dr. HUBBARD. We do not have statistics on that. We get letters constantly from servicemen, asking us to state under what conditions they can return to teaching. As to salaries, we are sending them our salary studies, and the studies of the Office of Education. I am sorry, sir, I cannot answer that for the country as a whole, but there is a small group that are now returning to the teaching profession.

Senator AIKEN. The reason I asked is because the men who left the farms to go into the armed services are not returning to the farms in any great numbers as they are discharged from the armed services.

Dr. HUBBARD. I heard of one study which had been made in a factory. It was a study made of teachers. I do not have the data with me here. The question asked was: "How many of you plan to return to teaching, your former job?” As I remember the statistics—and this is pulled out of the air—50 percent preferred to have factory work rather than teaching positions in the postwar period.

Senator ELLENDER. Are there any further questions? If not, thank you very much, Dr. Hubbard.

The committee will stand at recess until 2:30.

(Whereupon, at 12:10 p. m., the committee recessed until 2:30 p.m. of the same day.)

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