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ingly no reason why they should not be discussed in a manner that will attract the attention of business men.

The first part of the book deals with the trust question. There is nothing socialistic in the writer's attitude. He recognizes that trusts are a natural outgrowth of the economic conditions of the age and are not to be gotten rid of by violent action. Indeed, they possess many advantages, such as cheapening products and preventing waste. State ownership is not recommended. State control would be better. State ownership is more fitted for Germany than the United States. Germans are used to it. A uniform trust law passed by Congress would be a great help in regulating and controlling trusts. or minute statute law is not advisable. The common law against the restraint of trade may serve better than to burden our statute books with laws poorly adapted to the ends sought and rarely enforced. State control and publicity would accomplish much. Tariff reform is advocated and yet it is not to be considered as a panacea for all the trust evils.

Free trade England has seen almost as large a growth of trusts within the last few years as has protectionist America.

The second part of the book dealing with the tariff comes at an opportune time, when there seems to be so widespread an interest in all parties and a feeling that some modifications are desirable. The author takes free trade ground and maintains it ably. His attitude against protection is much more decided than against the trusts, but is by no means rabid. The time-worn argument for infant industries is the only one that has much validity and this has been worked to death and long since ceased to have any great practical application. The argument that the tariff keeps up wages is dismissed as untenable. Reciprocity is commended, but the warning is sounded that we must expect to make some real concessions, i. e., grant free trade to a certain extent, or foreigners will not give us any concessions in turn which are worth anything. Reciprocity with Cuba on the sugar question is strongly urged and the fact is clearly set forth that neither the Cubans nor any other country will trade with us long unless we take their goods in exchange, which means that we must remove prohibitive duties. Live and let live is the keynote to the argument.

The author does not advocate radical change, nor does he expect it soon, but believes that we are approaching a period when enlightened business sense will be brought to bear on the tariff question instead of allowing it to be managed by a few lobbyists. The book is a readable one and worthy of a careful reading.

PRINCIPLES OF SALES. By Reuben M. Benjamin. Second edition. Indianapolis : Bowen-Merrill Co. 1901. pp x, 401.

In its make up this work is similar to the “ Principles of Contract” published by the same writer in 1889. The law of the subject is expressed concisely in the form of rules, these being followed by illustrative cases and comment, together with citations of numerous decisions, both English and American. In the statement of principles, the author has made use of the British Sale of Goods Act with such modifications as the course of judicial decision in this country renders necess

essary. To the edition published in 1896, there have been

added a chapter on the provisions of the Statute of Frauds, and references to recent cases which bring the total number of citations to about two thousand. The book contains evidence of careful preparation and seems well calculated to be of use to the busy lawyer. It may be doubted whether a compendium of this sort is likely to be of much real service to the student who is not already familiar with the elements of the subject.

REVIEWS TO FOLLOW:

pp. xlviii,

ELEMENTS OF THE LAW OF BAILMENTS AND CARRIERS. By Philip D. Van Zile. Chicago : Callaghan & Co. 1902. pp. lvii, 785.

A TREATISE ON THE LAW OF INTERCORPORATE RELATIONS. Walter Chadwick Noyes. Boston: Little, Brown & Co. 1902. 703.

A BRIEF FOR THE TRIAL OF CRIMINAL CASES. Austin Abbott. Rochester : Co-operative Publishing Co. 1902. Pp. xx, 814.

A TREATISE ON THE LAW OF PRIVATE CORPORATIONS, Fifth edition. Henry Osborn Taylor. New York : The Banks Law Publishing

Co. 1902.

ELEMENTS OF THE LAW OF REAL PROPERTY. Grant Newell. Chicago: F. H. Flood & Co. 1902. pp. xii, 438.

STUDIES IN JURIDICAL LAW. Horace E. Smith. Chicago: F. H. Flood & Co. 1902. pp. xxvi, 359.

AMERICAN CASES ON CONTRACT. Second edition. Ernest M. Huffcut and Edwin H. Woodruff. Albany: Banks & Co. 1901. pp. xxv, 898.

THE PRACTICE IN Civil ACTIONS. William Rumsey. Second edition, by William Rumsey and John L. Shephard, Jr. Albany: Banks & Co. 1902. pp. xciii, 916.

MORPHINISM AND NARCOMANIAS FROM OTHER DRUGS; THEIR ETIOLOGY, TREATMENT AND MEDICO-LEGAL RELATIONS. F. D. Crathers. Philadelphia : W. B. Saunders & Co. 1902. pp. 350.

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