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governor is authorized, in concurrence with the executive of Connecticut, to communicate to congress the action of the two States on this subject, and to request the approval of congress of the boundaries thus established.

[Gov. ANDREWS to Gov. CORNELL.)
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

STATE OF CONNECTICUT,

HARTFORD, June 4, 1880. His Excellency Alonzo B. CORNELL, Governor of the State of Nero

York. Sir: I have the honor herewith to transmit to you a duly certified copy of the Resolution passed by the General Assembly of this State relating to the Boundary line between this State and the State of New York. In accordance with the second section of said Resolution I hereby make known to you that the agreement of the Joint Commission establishing the Boundary Line between the State of Connecticut and the State of New York has been approved and adopted by the State of Connecticut.

The people of both States may well be congratulated that this [word obliterated] boundary line, unadjusted for more than a hundred years, is now so happily settled.

I have the honor to be,

Your Excellency's Obedient Servant, - Original M S. Letter.

CHAS. B. ANDREWS.

[Gov. CORNELL TO Gov. ANDREWS.
STATE OF NEW YORK :

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,

Albany, August 5, 1880. Sir: Your letter of the 4th of June last, enclosing a certified copy of the resolution of the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut, ratifying the agreement of the joint commission establishing the boundary lines between the States of New York and Connecticut, was duly received. The congratulation expressed in view of the settlement of a question so long unadjusted, is especially fitting, and most cordially reciprocated.

By direction of the Legislature of this State, a certified copy of chapter 213, of the Laws of New York, passed May 8, 1880, entitled “ An act to ratify and confirm the agreement in relation to the boundary lines between the State of New York and the State of Connecticut, entered into by commissioners on the part of said States,” is herewith transmitted. Pursuant to section 3 of said act, a memorial to Congress, in quadruplicate, is respectfully submitted for your concurrence, touching the joint action of the two States on the subject contained, and requesting the approval of the same by Congress.

While making this communication to Congress, it is suggested that in order to preserve a complete record of every proceeding relative to this matter it would not be inappropriate to deposit a copy of the memorial, duly authenticated, in the office of the Secretary of State, in each State. Accordingly, therefore, a suitable number of copies have been prepared and attested by me; and if commended to your judgment, be pleased to return two of them to me with your signature affixed, together with copies of the joint resolution of your General Assembly, for the purpose and uses mentioned.

Yours very truly,

ALONZO B. CORNELL. His Excellency, CHARLES B. ANDREWS, Governor of the State of

Connecticut.

[MEMORIAL TO CONGRESS.) To the Congress of the United States :

In accordance with the concurrent action of the Legislature of the State of New York, and the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut, the undersigned respectfully communicate and make known to Congress that the agreement in relation to the boundary lines between the State of New York and the State of Connecticut, entered into by commissioners on the part of the said two States, has been formally ratified and confirmed, as specifically shown and set forth by the acts of the Legislatures of the respective States, true copies of which are hereto annexed.

And pursuant to said acts, in like terms adopted, it is hereby respectfully requested by us jointly, on the part of our respective States, that the action taken and done on the subject of the boundaries thus established, be approved by Congress. (Signed) ALONZO B. CORNELL,

Governor of the State of New York. CHARLES B. ANDREWS,

Governor of the State of Connecticut. August, 1880. -[Public Pupers of Gov. Cornell, 1880, pp. 95, 104.

[In Congress.]

[Public — No. 46.] AN ACT concerning settlement of boundary lines between New York

and Connecticut.

Approved February 26, 1881. Whereas, commissioners duly appointed on the part of the State of New York, and commissioners duly appointed on the part of the State of Connecticut, for the purpose of settling the boundary line between said States, did execute an agreement in the words following, to wit:'

*

and

Whereas said agreement has been confirmed by the legislatures of said States of New York and Connecticut respectively: Therefore,

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the consent of the Congress of the United States be, and hereby is, given to said agreement, and to each and every part thereof; and the boundaries established by said agreement are hereby approved: Provided, however, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to impair or in any manner to affect any right of the United States or jurisdiction of its courts in and over the islands or waters which form the subject of said agreement.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

April 27, 1881.
A true copy,
SEVELLON A. BROWN,

Chief Clerk.

[Gov. ANDREWS to Gov. CORNELL.
STATE OF CONNECTICUT :
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

HARTFORD, January 3, 1881.)
His Excellency,
ALONZO B. CORNELL,

Governor of New York: Sir:

I beg to inform you that in accordance with the provisions of special act 182 passed by the General Assembly of Connecticut at the January session 1880, a certified copy of which I have caused to be forwarded to you, I have appointed the Hon. Richard A. Wheeler, of Stonington,

See page 590, ante.—[P.

a member of the Commission created by said act, in place of the Hon. L. F. S. Foster, deceased.

I have the honor to be

Your obedient servant,

CHARLES B. ANDREWS, - [Original MS. Letter.

Governor.

[Gov. CORNELL TO THE N. Y. LEGISLATURE.

January 4, 1881.

The long-standing controversy in regard to the boundary line between this State and Connecticut has finally been adjusted in accordance with the terms agreed upon by the Commissioners appointed by the Legislatures of the two States. The necessary documents have been officially exchanged by the Executives, who have also united in a petition to Congress requesting the approval and confirmation of such settlement by the United States.

-N. Y. Assem. Journal, 1881, p. 26.

STATE OF New York, EXECUTIVE CAAMBER,

ALBANY, January 17, 1881. To the Legislature:

Herewith is respectfully transmitted a certified copy of an act of the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut, providing for a commission to negotiate with the State of New York concerning Fisher's Island.

ALONZO B. CORNELL.

N. Y. Assem. Journal, 1881, p. 53.

DETERMINATION OF THE NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY

JOINT BOUNDARY LINE.

[GOVERNOR LOVELACE TO INHABITANTS OF STATEN ISLAND.]

Fort James, New York,

May 12, 1669. Gentlemen

Having lately received a letter from my worthy Predecesso" C" Nicolls, wherein hee assures mee that his Royall Highnesse has declared his pleasure that Staten Island shall not att all belong to New Jersey bat bee esteemed as part of New Yorke and appertaine to this Governin' [here follows an order to cause a Town Meeting to be assembled, etc.) -[N. Y. Orders, Warrants, Letters, in office of N. Y. Sec'y of State, ii, 410.

[GOVERNOR LOVELACE TO CAPT. JAMES CARTERETT OF NEW JERSEY.)

September 18, 1672.

I receiv'd yo! Lett! by yo hands of M' Jones ; yo Contents were a Nar. rative of what had past between one of yo' Magistrates & my Marshall; I must confess I have heard something of that Story though imperfectly; neither did I give too much Creditt to his Relation, finding him to bee too much transported, wch I can attribute to noe other reason, than what hee averrs, his hard Treatm'; Tis true, I employ'd him to forewarne all persons (that had not that common Civility in them to desire Liberty of mee) to cutt & carry away Hay from Staten Island without my Approbačon; but it seems M: Hopkins (whether in contempt or Derision) p'sum'd to make an Essay, whither the Propriety belong’d to his Royall Highness, or ye Lord Proprieto" & as my Serv. ant averrs, when that was yo Dispute, hee was soe confident as to decide it theirs (for that was the Terme) And upon that Conclusion perhaps us'd him more vigorously than some undecent Reply of my Servant might meritt.

S' I hope there will not bee an Occasion of a Controversy of the Title of that Place after 8 yeares possession, together with a lawfull Purchase of the Natives, & not the least Contradiction from y' Lord Proprieto, but if any pragmatick Person, out of any Officiousness or sinister Ends of his own shall intermeddle in that Affayre, I shall assure him to maintaine my Royall Masters Interest to that Place, to the utmost of my Ability; M' Jones brought another Letter, but find

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