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TABLE IV.

METHODS OF CONTROL.

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N. Y. city.
I. During prevalence:
1. Cases removed to hospital:
Scarlet fever

24
Diphtheria

24 Measles.

15 2. Separate room for each disease.

15 3. One room or suite for all contagion.

59
(a) Separate pavilion
(b) Outside access or separable hall.. 36
(c) General infirmary

13
(d) Attendants strictly isolated from
other inmates only..

4
(e) Attendants strictly isolated from
other attendants

61
4. No provisions for quarantine:
(a) Dormitory set aside.

2
(b) Not quarantined:
Measles

3
Mumps

1 Chicken pox

2 Whooping-cough

1
5. Length of quarantine, individual cases:
21 days.

8
Scarlet fever
42 days.

1
Desquamation ceased

16 Desquamation ceased+7-14 days.... 6 Decided by doctor or board of health. 2 6-7 days

1 11 days

2 Diphtheria,

21 days. 30 days

1 ( 42 days

3 Sterile culture

12 Sterile culture+7-14 days.

3 Decided by doctor or board of health. 2

( 6-7 days

14 days Measles, 21 days..

10 30 days

4
42 days

1
Desquamation or catarrhal symp-
toms ceased, or longer...

12
Decided by doctor or board of health. 9

II. Disinfection: 1. Fumigation:

Material:
Sulphur only

59
Formaldehyde

7
Both

17
Quantity per 1,000 cubic feet:
Sulphur:
Less than 1 pound.

11
One to three pounds.

10 Three to five pounds.

12 Not stated

10 Board of health.

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* Eastern Inspection District, exclusive of Greater New York. † Western Inspection District.

TABLE IV-(Continued).

METHODS OF CONTROL.

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N.Y.city.
Formaldehyde, in general, according

to formula with generator.
2. Walls and floors:
Disinfectant solutions

45
Repainting, whitewashing, etc.
3. Bedding and clothing:

Destroyed ...
Fumigated only

4
Sterilized

54

15
6

88 18

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*Eastern Inspection District, exclusive of Greater New York. Western Inspection District.

TABLE V.

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OUTBREAKS OF CONTAGION.

N. Y. city. 1. Circunstances of first appearance: 1. Introduced by new child.

44 Less than one week.

22 In quarantine ...

15 Less than two weeks.

22 In quarantine

15 2. Introduced through public schools.

9 School in institution....

56 3. Introduced through visitors.

18 Also suspected but not traced....

15 4. Introduced through excursions, enter

tainments, church, Sunday school, etc. 1 5. Walking in streets or parks or going on

errands ..
6. “ Germs in air" from cases in neighbor-

ing tenements or on adjoining prem-
ises

3
7. Visits to home or friends.
8. Other causes

20 II. Circumstances of spreading: 1. Apparently common source of infection. 30 2. Communicated before diagnosis..... 37 3. Confined to one dormitory or set children

26 All mingle in school or play.

28 4. Contact of infirmary attendants with well children ...

2 Contact of infirmary attendants with well children, suspected only.....

2 5. Other causes

14 Institutions in which no disease has spread

10

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•Eastern Inspection District, exclusive of Greater New York. Western Inspection District.

*Tho figures in this table reler, not to the total number of times, but to the number ot institutions in which each cause has occurred.

MANUAL CONTAINING THE CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS AND THE

LAWS WHICH HAVE RELATION TO THE WORK OF THE STATE BOARD OF CHARITIES, AND THE RULES AND THE BY-LAWS OF THE BOARD.

THE STATE BOARD OF CHARITIES. *

By article VIII. of the Constitution of the State of New York, adopted in 1894, the State Board of Charities, created in 1867, became a constitutional body January 1, 1895. Such Constitution provides that the Board shall visit and inspect all institutions, whether State, county, municipal, incorporated or not incorporated, which are of a charitable, eleemosynary, correctional or reformatory character, including Institutions for epileptics and idiots, and all reformatories (save those in which adult males, convicted of felony, shall be confined), and excepting Institutions for the care and treatment of the insane, and for the detention of adults charged with or convicted of crime, or detained as witnesses and debtors.

The Constitution also provides that the members of the Board shall be appointed by the Governor, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, and all existing laws relating to institutions above mentioned, and to their supervision and inspection, in so far as such laws are not inconsistent with the provisions of the Constitution, shall remain in force, and that the Legislature may confer upon the Board any additional powers. It further provides that while payments by counties, cities, towns and villages to charitable, eleemosynary, correctional or reformatory Institutions, wholly or partiy under private control, for care, support and maintenance, may be authorized but shall not be required by the Legislature, no such payments shall be made for any such inmate of such institution who is not received and retained therein pursuant to rules established by the State Board of Charities.

The Commissioners comprising the Board are twelve in number, and are appointed for the term of eight years, one from each judicial district of the State, one additional member from the county of Kings, and three additional members from the county of New York. The Commissioners are required to reside in the districts from which they are respectively appointed, and no Commissioner can aot as such while a trustee, director or other administrative officer of any of the institutions subject to the visitation and inspection of the Board.

The principal duties of the Board are to visit, inspect and maintain a general supervision of all institutions, societies or associations which are of a charitable, eleemosynary, correctional or reformatory character, whether State or municipal, Incorporated or not incorporated, made subject to its jurisdiction by the Constitution and the statutes. Other duties are to frame rules for the reception and retention of inmates and to approve or disapprove the organization and incorporation of all institutions which are or shall be subject to the supervision and inspection of the Board.

The chief officers of the Board are a President and a Vice-President, elected annually from its members.

Each Commissioner receives as compensation ten dollars for each day's attendance at meetings of the Board or any of its committees, not to exceed $500 in a year to any commissioner, and is also paid his expenses while engaged, and his outlay for any ald or assistance rendered, in the performance of his duties. The Board is required to report to the Legislature annually. The seal of the office is the Arms of the State surrounded by the inscription, “ State of New York – The State Board of Charities."

*From the Legislatire Manual of 1902.

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