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III. REVIEW.

Elements of Mental and Moral Science : designed

to exhibit the Original Susceptibilities of the
Mind, and the Rule by which the rectitude of
any of its states or feelings should be judged.
By George Payne, A.M. J. Leavitt. New
York. 1829. Pp. 451, 8vo,

183 IV. The Annual Reports of the American Sunday

School Union, from 1825 to 1829 inclusive, 210

V. Remarks on a Certain Extreme in Pursuing the
Temperance Cause,

242

VI. REVIEW.

Regeneration, and the Manner of its Occurrence.

A Sermon from John v. 24. Preached at the
Opening of the Synod of New York, in the Rut-
gers Street Church, on Tuesday Evening, Oct.
20, 1829. By Samuel H. Cox, D.D. Pastor
of the Laight Street Presbyterian Church.
New York. 1829. Pp. 42,

250

VII. REVIEW.

Lectures on the Shorter Catechism of the Presby

terian Church in the United States of America,
addressed to youth. By Ashbel Green, D.D.

Philadelphia. A. Finley, and Tower and Hogan, 297 VIII. Letter of Dr Cooke, and Reply of the Editors, 310

IX. SELECT LIST OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS,

312

No. III. ART. I. REVIEW.

Essays and Dissertations in Biblical Literature.

By a Society of Clergymen. Vol. I. Contain-
ing chiefly translations of the works of German
Critics. New York. G. & C. & H. Carvill.
1829. Pp. 567, 8vo,

321

II. REVIEW.
The works of Dugald Stewart. In Seven Volumes.

Cambridge. Published by Hilliard and Brown.
1829,

358

III. Character of the Present Age,

372

IV. REVIEW.

A Letter from a Blacksmith to the Ministers and

Elders of the Church of Scotland; in which the
manner of Public Worship in that Church is
considered; its inconveniences and defects point-
ed out, and methods for removing them humbly
proposed. R. P. and C. Williams. Boston.
1824. Pp. 80, 12mo,

391

V. REVIEW.
August Hermann Francke. Eine Denkschrift zur

Saecularfeier seins Todes. Von D. Heinrich
Ernst Ferdinand Guerike, Licentiaten und Pri-
vatdocenten der Theologie bei der Universität
in Halle. Halle.
Halle. 1827. Pp. 474, 8vo,

408

VI. REVIEW

Review of an Article in the June number of the

Christian Spectator, entitled, “Inquiries res-
pecting the Doctrine of Imputation."

425

VII. SELECT LIST OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS,

473

No. IV.

Art. I. The Doctrine of Original Sin as held by the

Church, both before and after the Reformation, 481

II. REVIEW.
Dr Martin Luther's Briefe, Sendschreiben und

Bedenken, vollständig aus den verschiedenen
Ausgaben seiner Werke und Briefe, aus andern
Büchern und noch unbenutzten Handschriften
gesaminelt, kritisch und historisch bearbeitet von
Dr Wilhelm Martin Leberecht de Wette, Pro-

fessor der Theologie zu Basel.
Erster Theil. Luthers Briefe bis zu seinem Au-

fenthalt auf Wartburg. Nebst Luthers Bildniss.

Berlin, 1825. Pp. xxviii. 605, 8vo. 1825.
Zweiter Theil. Luthers Briefe von seinem Aufen-

thalt auf Wartburg bis zu seiner Verheurathung.
Berlin, 1826. Pp. 680,

504

BIBLICAL REPERTORY, AND THEOLOGICAL

REVIEW.

FOR JANUARY 1830.

REVIEW ON THE SCRIPTURE DOCTRINE OF

THE SECOND ADVENT.

The Second Advent; or, the Glorious Epiphany of our Lord

Jesus Christ. Being an attempt to elucidate, in Chronological Order, the Prophecies both of the Old and New Testament which relate to that Event. By the Rev. John Fry, B.A. Rector of Desford, in Leicestershire. London, 2 vols, Svo, 1822.

[The conductors of the Biblical Repertory and Theological Review do not desire to make the work the vehicle exclusively of their own opinions, but are desirous of extending to their correspondents the liberty of advocating their own sentiments, reserving to themselves the right of deciding how far the opinions advanced can, with propriety, through their instrumentality, be presented to the public. They are, therefore, not to be considered as adopting the views presented by the author of the article on the Second Advent. As the subject, however, is one of interest, and has long been a matter of public discussion in England, it is probable our readers will be glad to see an exhibition of the

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different views there entertained respecting it. The extravagancies and eccentricities of many of the leading members of the “ prophetic school” have thrown a discredit on the subject, which belongs properly to the individuals, and not to the investigations in which they are engaged.]

" There is scarce a prophecy in the Old Testament concerning Christ, which doth not in something or other relate to his second coming.” This striking sentence is from the pen of Sir Isaac Newton, one of the very best writers on the prophecies; whose repute as an expositor would at this day have been greater, had his fame as a. philosopher been less; few men having ever lived so well qualified to act at once as the hierophants of nature and of revelation. Let the truth of the remark be conceded, and it furnishes us with the real clue-allowing of course for the inveterate moral pravity of the human heart—to the Jews' rejection of the Saviour. They confounded the predictions of his first coming with those of the second. Of the second advent it was foretold that the Lord should come in state, in power, and great glory; that is, in a manner more accordant with the general expectation concerning him; that the end of his coming was to establish a glorious kingdom on earth; that he should come with ten thousand of his saints; that the clouds of heaven and attendant hosts of angels should signalize his bright epiphany; that he should appear conspicuous in regal dignity, being “made higher than the kings of the earth;” that his people should share in the glory of this his manifestation; that the kingdom and the greatness of the kingdom under the whole heaven should be given to them: while on the other hand, all opposing powers of whatever name, “ being adversary and evil occurrent," should be utterly and triumphantly put down. It is not surprising therefore, that with those splendid visions floating before their eyes; with the pomp and glitter of an august terrestrial kingdom held out to their hopes, they should have felt in all its force the contrast between the lofty style of their prophets and the lowly guise of Jesus of Nazareth, “whose father and mother they knew :" we can see with what disastrous facility they might have stumbled at this stumbling stone, at which they did stumble; and how natural that they should have been fatally scandalized at the claims and assumptions of the son of Joseph and Mary. By the powers

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