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APPENDIX F.

REFERENCES TO THE UNITED STATES CENSUS IN PRESIDENTS'

MESSAGES.

October 25, 1791.-President Washington, in his third annual address to Congress, reported the completion of the census of the inhabitants, for which provision was made by law.” (Messages and Papers of the Presidents, vol. 1, p. 106.)

March 3, 1792. — President Washington, in a special message to Congress, transmitted a copy of a return of the number of inhabitants of South Carolina, as made to him by the marshal of that district. (Idem, vol. 1, p. 116.)

April 5, 1792.- President Washington sent a message to the House of Representatives vetoing an act entitled "An act for an apportionment of Representatives among the several states according to the first enumeration." (Idem, vol. 1, p. 124.)

December 8, 1801. ---President Jefferson, in his first annual message to Congress, laid before them “the results of the census lately taken of our inhabitants, to a conformity with which we are now to reduce the ensuing ratio of representation and taxation,” and made allusion to the rapid increase of the population. (Idem, vol. 1, p. 327.)

December 23, 1801.-President Jefferson, in a special message to Congress, transmitted another return of the census of the state of Maryland, just received from the marshal of that state, “which he desires may be substituted as more correct than the one first returned by him.” (Idem, vol. I, p. 333.)

February 28, 1811.-President Madison, in a message to Congress, recommended its attention to a report of the Secretary of State relating to deficiencies in the returns of the census. (Idem, vol. 10, p. 39.)

March 13, 181ì.-President Madison, in a message to Congress, forwarded to it the result of the census lately taken of the inhabitants of the United States, with a letter from the Secretary of State relating thereto. (Idem, vol. 10, p. 40.)

December 6, 1825.-President J. Q. Adams, in his first annual message to Congress, called attention to the results of the fourth census, and to the progress of the nation as shown thereby. (Idem, vol. 2, p. 314.)

December 2, 1828.-President J. Q. Adams, in his fourth annual message to Congress, called attention to their duty to make provision for taking the fifth census, and made suggestions, in connection therewith, that the enumeration of the population be commenced earlier in the year than the 1st of August; that more detailed data concerning the ages of the people be collected than in prior censuses; and that the imperfections in preceding census enumerations were largely due to the inadequateness of the compensation allowed to marshals and their assistants in taking them. (Idem, vol. 2, p. 420.)

December 8, 1829.- President Jackson, in his first annual message to Congress, called attention to the necessity of early provision for taking the census, in order to complete the work within a convenient time. (Idem, vol. 2, p. 461.)

December 15, 1830.--President Jackson, in a special message to Congress, reported that several marshals had been unable to complete the enumeration of inhabitants within the time prescribed by law, and suggested legislation allowing further time for making returns. (Idem, vol. 2, p. 530.)

December 7, 1831.-President Jackson, in a special message to Congress, transmitted two letters from the Secretary of State accompanied by statements showing the progress made in the work of the fifth census, and by a printed copy of the revision of the statements theretofore transmitted of all former enumerations of the population of the United States and their territories. (Idem, vol. 2, p. 559.)

December 3, 1838.- President Van Buren, in his second annual message to Congress, recommended the adoption of the necessary provisions for taking the sixth census, and suggested “whether the scope of the measure might not be usefully extended by causing it to embrace authentic statistical returns of the great interests

p. 86.)

specially intrusted to or necessarily affected by the legislation of Congress.” (Idem, vol. 3, p. 497.)

February 28, 1839.-President Van Buren, in a special message to Congress, transmitted a communication from the Secretary of War “respecting the importance of requiring the officers who may be employed to take the next general census to make a return of the names and ages of pensioners.(Idem, vol. 3, p. 527.)

December 24, 1839.-President Van Buren, in a special message to Congress, transmitted “a report from the Secretary of State on the subject of the law providing for taking the sixth census of the United States.' (Idem, vol. 3, p. 558.)

June 1, 1841.—President Tyler, in a special-session message to Congress, referred to the increase of population as shown by the sixth census. (Idem, vol. 4, p. 41.)

December 7, 18,1.-President Tyler, in his first annual message to Congress, stated that the Secretary of State would report to Congress the progress of the work of the sixth census, and reported the population of the United States, as shown thereby. (Idem, vol. 4, p. 81.)

December 25, 1842.- President Tyler, in a special message to the House of Representatives, announced his approval of “ An act for an apportionment of Representatives among the several states according to the sixth census," with an exposition of his reasons for such approval. (Idem, vol. 4, p. 159.)

December 4, 1849.- President Taylor, in his first annual message to Congress, stated that the census board had completed its duties in preparing forms and schedules for the seventh census, and that “it now rests with Congress to enact a law” for taking said census. (Idem, vol. 5, p. 22.)

December 2, 1850.- President Fillmore, in his first annual message to Congress, reported the appointment of a superintendent of census, and the adoption of other measures for taking the seventh census, and suggested the propriety of making early legal provision for the publication of abstracts of the census returns. • (Idem,

vol. 5, December 2, 1851.-President Fillmore, in his second annual message to Congress, stated that the Superintendent of Census is diligently employed in classifying and tabulating the data of the seventh census, and expressed the earnest hope “ that Congress will lose no time in making the appropriations necessary to complete the classifications and to publish the results in a style worthy of the results and of our national character.” (Idem, vol. 5, pp. 129–130.)

December 6, 1852.- President Fillmore, in his third annual message to Congress, reported that the larger portion of the work of the seventh census had been finished, and that the apportionment of Representatives had been made by the Secretary of the Interior, and suggested that it devolved upon Congress to provide for the publication of the results of the census. (Idem, vol. 5, p. 172.)

December 5, 1853.-President Pierce, in his first annual message to Congress, referred to the successive decennial censuses, and discussed the probabilities as to the future growth of population., (Idem, vol. 5, pp. 223-224.)

January 21, 1859.-President Buchanan, in special messages to the Senate and to the House of Representatives, transmitted “a digest of the statistics of manufactures, according to the returns of the seventh census.'' (Idem, vol. 5, pp. 535–536.)

December 3, 1861.-President Lincoln, in his first annual message to Congress, alluded to the increase of population as shown by the last (eighth) census, and preceding censuses, and made prediction as to the probable future growth of population. (Idem, vol. 6, p. 58.)

December 1, 1862.-President Lincoln, in his second annual message to Congress, made use of census statistics in support of his proposition to make compensation for emancipated slaves. (Idem, vol. 6, pp. 138-139.)

December 6, 1869.-President Grant, in his first annual message to Congress, suggested the necessity of early Congressional action in order to make the ninth census more complete and perfect than previous censuses. (Idem, vol. 7, p. 42.)

December 5, 1870. —President Grant, in his second annual message to Congress, reported progress in the work of the ninth census. (Idem, vol. 7, p. 112.)

December 4, 1871.-President Grant, in his third annual message, stated that the port of the Secretary of the Interior, submitted therewith, would give "all the formation collected and prepared for publication in regard to the census taken durng the year 1870." (Idem, vol. 7, p. 152.)

December 2, 1872.-President Grant, in his fourth annual message to Congress, reported the near completion of the work of the ninth census, and submitted recommendation that a national census be taken in 1875, giving reasons therefor. (Idem, vol. 7, p. 202.)

December 1, 1873. —President Grant, in his fifth annual message to Congress, reported the completion of the work of the ninth census, and renewed recommenda

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tion that a national census be taken in 1875; he also expressed the belief that a reg. ular census every five years would be of substantial benefit to the country. (Idem, vol. 7, p. 254.)

December 21, 1881.-President Arthur, in a special message to the House of Representatives, transmitted a recommendation by the Secretary of the Interior for an appropriation to defray expenses of the tenth census. (Idem, vol. 8, p. 67.)

February 2, 1882.-President Arthur, in a special message to Congress, transmitted a communication from the Secretary of the Interior in regard to the necessity for additional legislation for defraying the expenses of the tenth census. (Idem, vol. 8, p. 77.)

May 9, 1882.-President Arthur, in a special message to Congress, transmitted a letter from the Secretary of the Interior, submitting an estimate by the Superintendent of Census for an appropriation to defray the expenses of the census office. (Idem, vol. 8, p. 103.)

June 16, 1882.-President Arthur, in a special message to Congress, submitted a recommendation by the Secretary of the Interior for an appropriation to complete the work of the tenth census. (Idem, vol. 8, p. 108.)

January 5, 1883.-President Arthur, in a special message to Congress, submitted a request from the Secretary of the Interior for an appropriation to complete the work of the tenth census. (Idem, vol. 8, p. 150.)

December 1,1890.–President Harrison, in his second annual message to Congress, announced the completion of the enumeration of the population of the United States under the provisions of the act of March 3, 1889. (Idem, vol. 9, p. 118.)

December 9, 1891.-President Harrison, in his third annual message to Congress, reported the progress of the work of the eleventh census, and suggested the necessity of prompt appropriations. (Idem, vol. 9, p. 205.)

December 6, 1892.-President Harrison, in his fourth annual message to Congress, made comparison of certain statistics shown by the censuses of 1880 and 1890. (Idem, vol. 9, p. 306.)

December 3, 1894.-President Cleveland, in his second annual message to Congress, reported the progress of the work of the eleventh census, gave an account of disbursements in connection therewith, and described the general plan of the work. (Idem, vol. 9, p. 546.)

December 5, 1898.-President McKinley, in his second annual message to Congress, urged upon it the importance of early legislation providing for the taking of the twelfth census, as being necessary in view of the large amount of work which must be performed in the preparation of the schedules preparatory to the enumeration of the population. (Idem, vol. 10, p. 198.)

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APPENDIX G.

REFERENCES TO THE UNITED STATES CENSUS IN CERTAIN

GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS.

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(This appendix contains the references to the United States census in the Government puhiieatras named, so far as generally shown by the indexes thereto. It probably represents an app. In complete statement, but it is not the result of an entirely original examination of the pubiiats

November 1, 1791.-Senate report on census of 1790. (Journal of the Senate, 33 Cong., 1st sess., pp. 329, 330.)

December 18, 1821.-5. Q. Adams, Secretary of State, transmits letter and doments relating to the fourth census. (Ex. papers, 17th Cong., 1st sess., vol. 1. Sat.

January 17, 1832.- Edw. Livingston, Secretary of State, transmite copies of intro tions, regulations, and forms, in taking fifth census. (House Ex. Docs., 21 Cosz.. Ist sess., vol. 2, No. 58.)

January 28, 1832.- Edw. Livingston, Secretary of State, transmite information regard to erroneous returns of slaves in fifth census. (House Ex. Docs., Cz. 1st sess., vol. 3, No. 84.)

May 24, 1832.- Edw. Livingston, Secretary of State, transmits a statement 0.9.
cerning errors in fifth census. (House Ex. Docs., 220 Cong., 1st sess., vo.... 14

February 21, 1839.-J. L. Edwards, Commissioner of Pensions, trarse
munication urging importance of securing returns of names and ages of pe
sixth census. (Ex. Docs., 25th Cong., 3d sess., vol. 6, No. 239.)

December 24, 1839.—John Forsyth, Secretary of State, transmits detais
of sixth census enumeration. (Senate Docs., 26th Cong., 1st sess, o... Noi

February 24, 1841.-John Forsyth, Secretary of State, reports press
toward completion of sixth census. (Senate Docs., 26th Cong., 2 sata

June 18, 1842.—Daniel Webster, Secretary of State, tran-mits entirai -
priation required for distribution of sixth census. (House Docs., 27th Cing. 23
vol. 5, No. 245.)

May 1, 1844.-J. C. Calhoun, Secretary of State, transmits repor as eerste
sixth census. (House Docs., 27th Cong., 2d sess., vol. 5, No. 245.)

May 16, 1844.—Memorial of "American Statistical Associatico." reprezi
various and gross errors have been discovered in the printed when
census, and setting forth, at large, what they deem those erturs to be
the House, 28th Cong., 1st sess., pp. 932, 1170.)

Several memorials were presented during the first session of the Twentieth
Congress (1843-44) on the same subject as above. (Journal of the Home

June 17, 1844.—-Representative Pratt transmits report as to run in sth census; inquiry into morals of colored people, impracticable: iconai statisti slavery. (House Reports, 28th Cong., 1st sess., vol. 3, 99.579.1

December 10, 1844. -Memorial of " American Stati-tiral Anun." praringite correction of certain errors in the sixth census. (Journal of the benate. Puth Cong., 2d sess., p. 27.)

February 27, 1845.–Senator Choate transmits report norning errore in sixth census. (Senate Docs., 28th Cong., 21 sees., vol. 8, No. 146.)

March 9, 1848.- Memorial of “New York Historical fxiety," praying the adoption of certain measures in relation to census of 1850. (Journal of the Senate, 30th Cung,, 1st sess., p. 207.)

May 30, 1848.-Petition of citizens of Caresco, Wisconsin, praying that census of 1850 may show the number of freeholders in each state and territory. (Journal of the Senate, 30th Cong., 1st sent., pp. 380, 361.)

January , 1849.- Nahum Capen and Jense Chickering make suggestions as to proper scope of census work, and how it should be conducted. (Senate Mis. Doce., 30th Cong., 2d sees., vol. 1, No. 64.) S. Doc. 194 61

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