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these People, lawless among themselves, afford an Assylum and secure Retreat to disorderly

Persons, not only of this Government, but of all the neighbouring Provinces, by which accessions, and the Constant Countenance of the Colony of Connecticut, their numbers have of late greatly increased ; that the avowal of their Intentions is uniformly the same, especially since the account from Connecti. cut that “the Government has openly espoused their Cause, and taken them under their Protection.” Deplorable indeed must be the situation of your Petitioners, if called on to defend by Force of Arms their Infant Settlements against the Power of a whole Colony; that the Consequence must be ruin to their fortunes and Families in their present distracted Situation; as common Subjects of the Province, and entituled to the Protection of the Laws, your Petitioners cannot help looking up to your Honor for the aid of Gov. ernm't; they have hitherto maintained an unequal Contest, possessed of Property themselves, they have been obliged with arms in their hands to defend it against those who had no property, subject themselves to Law; they have had to Contend with those who refused Subjection to any Law, and have not been able to reduce them to order, which is confessing a Weakness they can no longer conceal; that the whole Posse of the County is not sufficient to enforce the Laws at Wyoming, and as the Inhabitants have not hitherto been able to prevent the Continuance of the Connecticut Intruders in that Part of the Province contrary to Law, and the Repeated Proclamations of Government, they fear their utmost Efforts will not be sufficient to keep their Possessions without the Interposition and Protection of the Legislature, which therefore, they Implore, and from the known Clemency and Justice of the administration, consider themselves as having reason to expect.”

The said Petition being taken into consideration, it was the opinion of the Board that the same should be laid before the Assembly, accompanyed by a Message from the Governor to enforce it; Mr. Chew, Mr. Tilghman, Mr. Allen, and Mr. Shippen, are appointed to prepare a Draught of a Proper Message for that Purpose.

The Secretary laid before the Board a new Return and Draught of the Public Road or King's Highway, from the Middle Ferry on Schuylkill to the Village of Strasburg, in Lancaster County, as the same was resurveyed and laid out, with the Errors and Mistakes made in the former Survey Corrected pursuant to an Order of Coun. cil of the fourth day of February last. The said return and draught being taken into consideration by the Board, it is ordered and ad. judged, that the Road as therein mentioned to be resurveyed and laid out, be forever hereafter a Public Road or King's Highway. And it is further Ordered that the Supervisors of the High Ways for the Several Townships in the Counties of Philadelphia, Chester and Lancaster, through which the said Road leads, do, with all convenient speed, cause the same to be Cleared and opened of the Breadth of sixty feet through their Respective Townships, accord. ing to the Courses and distances set forth in the said Return of Survey, which follows in these words, Viz':

" To the lIonourable RICHARD PENN, Esquire, Lieutenant

Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Province of Pennsylvania, and Counties of New Castle, Kent, and Sussex, on Delaware, and to his Council.

“We, the Subscribers, do Certifie that in pursuance of an Order of the said Governor and Council, bearing date the fourth day of February, in the year of our Lord, one thousand Seven hundred and seventy-three, directing Joseph Fox, Jacob Lewis, Daniel Williams, John Morton, John Sellers, and James Webb, or any four of them, to re-examine and Compare the Courses and Distances of the late laid out Provincial Road from the Middle Ferry, on Schuylkill, to the Village of Strasburg, and to correct any Error or Errors that were made in the Former return of the said Road, &c*;' We, the said Subscribers, have re-surveyed and Measured the most part of the said Road, and having corrected the few mistakes made in the former Survey, do dow, in Obedience to the said Order, make return of a new Survey and measurement thereof in manner following, to wit: Begining at the middle of the West end of the said Middle Ferry Wharf; thence extending North seventy degrees, West four hundred and eighty-nine perches to a marked Black Oak, standing eleven perches and two Links from Thomas Harris's House, in Range with the East side thereof; thence West thirteen perches to a stone, thence South seventy-one degrees, west twenty-four perches to the Mill creek; thence the last Course continued ten perches to a marked Hickory; thence North Eightythree degrees, West five hundred and sixty-seven perches to a marked white Oak, within four perches of Cob's Creek, and half a perch below the present Bridge; thence North Fifty-seven degrees, West, crossing said Creek, thirty-six perches to a heap of Stones, (three perches southwest of a Ditch or Water Course); thence South eighty-two degrees and a half, west one hundred and fiftyeight perches to a marked White Oak, standing fourteen perches and two links South, seventeen degrees west of the Southernmost point of John Sellers's Old Meadow and Mill Race; thence as near as may be, North seventy-three degrees and a half West so as to strike a marked White Oak in the Northwest corner of John Lewis's Field by the Bars, one and a quarter perch from said Lewis's Meadow Water Course, and on the South side of the Road leading from said Lewis's House to Haverford Road, and to continue said Course with little variation in the whole eleven hundred and eighty-eight perches to a stake and heap of Stones in William Laurence's Field near the Head of a spring, in which stands a Hollow Maple; South Forty-nine degrees West distant four perches,

VOL. X.-8.

and three-tenths of a perch, and said William Lawrence's Stora dwelling House stands North three degrees, West from said stake and heap of Stones; thence North seventy degrees, West one hundred Perches to a heap of Stones in a Field of said Lawrence's, from which said Lawrence has a Log House standing North thirtyeight degrees East; thence North eighty-seven degrees and a half, west forty eight perches to a small Rock by the side of the Present Path from which the clif of the side of an upright Larger Rock bears North forty-nine degrees, East distant four perches, into the Northermost part of the said Clif; thence North Sixty degrees and a half, West twenty-three perches to Darby Creek, a few feet below the Present and old Fording place; thence the last Course Continued across said Creek fifty-seven perches to a heap of Stones, from which Thomas Powell's new Log House bears North fifty-three degrees, East distant five perches and a half a perch; thence north forty degrees and a half, West forty-six perches to a Stake in said Powell's Field; thence North Seventy-six degrees and a quarter, West seven perches to a large Spanish Oak marked; thence the last course continued five hundred and ninety-four perches to a Black Oak Stump between two Hollows, and in or on the side of an old Road; thence North eighty-three degrecs, West one bundred and eighty-eight perches to a large Cherry Tree by the side of the Old Road, and opposite the North-West end of Richard Fowkes's House; thence North seventy-eight degrees, West eighty-seven perches to a Stake, opposite a Hollow that is Northward in said Fowke's Field ; thence North Seventy degrees and a half, West one bundred and fifty-three perches to a Stake in the Intersection of two Roads, and between a School House and Nathaniel Newland's Smith Shop; thence South eighty-seven degrees and a half, West three hundred and Forty-seven perches to a Stake in the Lane and Road crossing William Reese's Land, four perches South of a small Hollow leading into his Tenant, Phillip Sheaf's field and Meadow; thence North eighty-five degrees, West one hundred and forty-nine perches to a Black Oak by the side of a Fence, in or near the line between the said William Reese's Land and Nathan Lewis's; thence North sixty-nine degrees, West eighty-eight perches to a marked White Oak, standing four perches and three quarters of a Perch East from Crum Creek; thence North seventy-eight degrees, West -across said Crum Creek, and Passing seven feet Southeast of a large Rock in Francis Yarnal's Field, one hundred and sixty perches to a Stake on the North Side of the Present Old Road, and on the West edge of a ditch or Water Course six feet South of an Ash Tree; thence South eighty-six degrees, West nearly along the Old Road eighty perches to a large marked Chestnut tree, opposite said Yarnal's lane; thence North seventy-three degrees, West four hundred - and thirty perches to a Stake and heap of Stones in a hollow near a Tan Yard, the Bark Mill House bearing South forty-one degrees, West distant fourteen perches; thence North sixty-four degrees,

West two hundred and fifty-four perches to a stake and heap of Stones in Isaac Garrett's Field, from which the Chimney of said Garrett's old house stands South thirty degrees East, and a heap of earth and stones, (formerly a Smith's Hearth) bears North fourteen degrees and a half, East distant twenty-six perches by the side of an Old Road; thence North eighty-four degrees, West four hundred and fifty-nine perches into an old road Eighteen perches, Southerly of Jesse Garrett's Stone House, and in range with the West end thereof; thence North Seventy-six degrees and a half, West as near as may be, to go between Isaac Williams's House and Spring House, two perches South of his House, and in range with the West end of said House three bundred and twenty perches; thence the last Course Continued with a little variation Northward, nine hundred and eighty perches to the Oak Tree on which the sign of the Boot hangs; thence North seventy-three degrees, West one hundred and twenty-eight Perches into the middle of the Old Road, opposite Captain Harper's House, distant four perches from the Front of said House ; thence South eighty-nine degrees and a half, West four hundred and sixteen perches into the middle of the said Old Road, opposite three small Chesnut trees marked on the North side thereof; thence South sixty-three degrees and a balf, West one hundred and forty-eight perches to the middle of said Old Road, opposite the East Corner of a Field on the North side of the Old Road at two perches distant from said Field; thence South seventy four degrees and a half, West two hundred and seventy-two perches to a stake at the West end of a Row of Cherry Trees along side of the Old Road; thence South eighty-eight degrees and a half, West seventy-two perches to a stake in Wilmington Road near a Smith Shop; thence North sixty-one degrees West ninety-two perches to a stake on the North-east side of the old Road; thence North seventy-six degrees and a balf West seventytwo perches to a stake; thence North sixty-eight degrees and a half West forty-nine perches to a stake, on the west side of said Old Road ; thence North forty-eight degrees and a half West fifty-six perches to a stake in the Turn of said Road, about four perches from the Bottom of a Hill; thence South eighty-two degrees and a half West three hundred and forty-four perches to Josh“ Baldwin's line; thence South eighty-six degrees and a half West three bundred and fifty perches to the East side of Brandywine, at the old Fording place; thence the last Course Continued across Brandywine one hundred and twenty-five perches into the old Conestoga Road; thence South seventy-three degress West along said Conestoga Road, one bundred and sixty-three perches to the Post whereon the Sign of the Ship Hangs, in the old Conestoga Road opposite Thomas Parke's House; thence South seventy degrees and a half West three hundred and sixty-two perches to a marked Chestnut tree by the West side of Curtis Lewis's Field; thence South eighty-eight degrees and a half West two hundred and sixty-eight perches to a marked Black Oak in Thomas Pim's Lane ; thence South seventy-seven degrees and a quarter West eight hundred and sixty-eight perches to a tree in the old Road whereon Alexander Fleming's sign hangs; thence the last course continued, two hun. dred and fourteen perches to a Spanish Oak on the Brow of the Hill on the side of the old Road; thence South sixty-eight degrees West fifty-two perches to a marked Oak on the East side of the West Branch of Brandeywine, a few feet below the Present Road and Fording place; thence crossing the said Creek South sixty-six degrees and three-quarters West eighty perches to a stake; thence South sixty-nine degrees and a half West one hundred and twenty perches to a stake ; thence South seventy-eight degrees and a half West two hundred and eighty perches to a small Črab-tree, by the side of an old Road; thence South Seventy-two degrees and three-quarters West three hundred and eight perches to a marked Ash Tree on the side of a small run, a little below a Spring in John Scott's Field; thence South Seventy-eight degrees West two hundred and twenty perches to Wilmington Road; thence crossing said Wilmington Road, North seventy-eight degrees and a half West two hundred and forty perches to a Stump on the East side of a Branch of Buck-Run; thence South seventy-nine degrees West one hundred and eighteen perches opposite to Thomas Truman's Store-house; thence South eighty-four degrees West two hundred and sixty-two perches to a stake, in the Old Road opposite to Thomas Marshe's; thence North Seventy-two degrees and a half West two hundred and ninety-eight perches to an old House of John Boggs's, on the South side of the present old Road; thence North seventy-four degrees West three hundred and sixty-eight perches to a stake, at the Head of a Hollow, a little to the westward of a line dividing the Lands of William Moore and William Powell; thence North seventy-nine degrees West five hundred and twenty perches to a marked Ash; thence North sixty degrees West three hundred and one perches to opposite the Head of a Spring. near Samuel Simond's House ; thence North Seventy-two degrees and a half West two hundred and sixty-two perches to a stake, in an old Road forty-nine feet south of the Front Door of Francis Leeche's Public House ; thence North thirty-five degrees West seventy-four perches to a stake, twenty-seven feet West of a Stone Spring House, by the side of an old Road in the Gap; thence North Eleven degrees and a half West eleven perches to a stake and stone; thence North fifty degrees West nineteen perches to a Spanish Oak; thence North eighty-nine degrees West two thousand three hundred and thirty-eight perches to a stake; thence South eighty-eight degrees West two hundred and nineteen perches to a large White Oak; thence North seventy-two degrees West fortynine perches to a stone opposite to Docherly's old House ; thence North eighty-four degrees fifty minutes West, along Strasburg street one hundred and eighty perches to the Intersection of a

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