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without end. And if in the meantime among all the chances of experiments, he throws any which appear either new or useful, he feeds his mind with these, as so many earnests; boasts and extols them above measure, and conceives great hopes of what is behind.”

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DISTRESS

WITH AND WITHOUT SYMPATHY.

It seems, therefore, that as we frequently laugh at distress with which, from ignorance or from intelligence, we do not sympathize; this species of laughter is a sign of distress without sympathy, of deformity without pain.

I went last week in the steam-boat to Margate, there were between three and four hundred passengers. It blew a hurricane. I am satisfied that there were not fifty who were not in all the agonies of sea-sickness. Of this number there were three or four John Bulls, whose amusement consisted in asking the different sufferers whether they were hungry, and in violent laughing at the remonstrances which were made to their importunate and impertinent questions. If any of the sufferers had fallen overboard, the laughter would not have existed : very different sensations would have been excited. Sea-sickness was to minds like these distress without sympathy; the chance of being drowned would have been distress with sympathy.

Captain Usher presented to Mr. Kean, the celebrated tragedian, a young lion. I have seen the lion playful as a lamb caressing its master; it grew to an enormous size. Mr. Kean being obliged to quit London to attend

his prosincial engag

um 11 difi-pen' para Lagiak was advised to end ti iu i Laci Luang airp great cart would be take u Eti u reluri, pened to be at in Duis ut tie var at the same ** removed, he was pui mu é nome a Bar keeper med sent Tu mai i1 ASK M** upon the ma tha ti bu. iru ascus nist #taar rough motion, wprug a tu* irar as 1511 sairas. through the wm* : ti euecimal ministar unut round to run stratı ve km fart, tur utmeg tuas isus face, he jumped Guru iruna tie sans au tal **** fast as be ovuld.

This is datos tavut tupatus i tu inn use seized the cornuak, # *uus kast 1. Gure la sympathy.

A clergyan, latest that anges in aume, who had been cream கராக பா க that years, applied to be a wastintru * 1, a cantit s' naat. the chaplain, " upsed soy (yaway favourite chapter in the 2 Cursa resta, nu tag antiquated candidate v trauciet at D*** ** more exquisiddy England beauty of his style, ticat 1 ss to the largest nam with another chapter: Barl, sans le doma St. Luke, I ized hujan te tresseto * 10 wine as he pleased of the thond hanya 'I was 9 y.45. shut the book, a behisory wym, , "inart been more than thirty years * erat sa buhay. diocese : I have had a well *** ***** **! to me: and having a wittu ****, ** » » pesad object to me. My gonnt den 4** * Join uw myself candidate for the primit, i ** ** 1 o site, DISTRESS

WITH AND WITHOUT SYMPATHY.

It seems, therefore, that as we frequently laugh at distress with which, from ignorance or from intelligence, we do not sympathize; this species of laughter is a sign of distress without sympathy, of deformity without pain.

I went last week in the steam-boat to Margate, there were between three and four hundred passengers. It blew a hurricane. I am satisfied that there were not fifty who were not in all the agonies of sea-sickness. Of this number there were three or four John Bulls, whose amusement consisted in asking the different sufferers whether they were hungry, and in violent laughing at the remonstrances which were made to their importunate and impertinent questions. If any of the sufferers had fallen overboard, the laughter would not have existed : very different sensations would have been excited. Sea-sickness was to minds like these distress without sympathy; the chance of being drowned would have been distress with sympathy.

Captain Usher presented to Mr. Kean, the celebrated tragedian, a young lion. I have seen the lion playful as a lamb caressing its master; it grew to an enormous size. Mr. Kean being obliged to quit London to attend his provincial engagements in different parts of England, was advised to send the lion to Exeter Change, where great care would be taken of it till his return.

I happened to be at his house on the day when the lion was removed; he was put into a hackney-coach, and the keeper mounted behind. The coach had no sooner moved upon the stones than the lion, not accustomed to this rough motion, sprung on the front seat, and put his head through the window; the coachman immediately turned round to romonstrate with his fare, but meeting the lion's face, he jumped down from the box and ran away as fast as he could.

This is distress without sympathy. If the lion had seized the coachman, it would have been distress with sympathy.

A clergyman, between the age of fifty and sixty, who had been in deacon's orders upwards of thirty years, applied to be admitted priest. “ I, as usual,” said the chaplain, “opened my Greek Testament at my favourite chapter in the 2 Corinthians, and desired my antiquated candidate to translate it. Never was Greek more exquisitely englished. I was so struck with the beauty of his style, that I resolved to indulge myself with another chapter: and, opening the Gospel of St. Luke, I begged him to translate as much or as little as he pleased of the third chapter. The old gentleman shut the book, and looking up at me, said; “ I have been more than thirty years a curate in his lordship's diocese : I have had a small piece of preferment offered to me: and having a wife and ten children, it is a great object to me. My good dame over-persuaded me to offer myself candidate for the priesthood, for which I am unfit,

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