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Chronology (Diplomatic) from 1326 to 1833, furnishing Dates of Treaties, Conven-

tions, &r..
Ministers of the United States, abroad, for 1834,
Consuls of the United States, abroad,

22
Commissioners under the Convention with France, of 10th July, 1832,

24
Commissioners under the Treaty with the Two Sicilies, of 14th October, 1832, .

24
Ministers, &c. of Foreign Powers, near the United States, ..

24
Presidents, Secretaries of States, and Diplomatic Agents, since the Federal Con-
stitution went into Operation, in 1789,.

25
Table du Chiffre, Martens . .

27
Declaration of Independence of the United States of America,

28
Federal Constitution of the United States of America, ..

30
ALGIERS.
1. Of peace and amity, of the 5th of September, 1795; negotiated at Algiers, by

Joseph Donaldson, junior, under an appointment from David Humphreys,
commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States. Ratified on the 2d of March,
1796. Annulled by war.

479
Art. 1. Firm and sincere peace and amity.....

ib
2. Free trade with Algiers-Duties- Naval and military stores may be sold duty free.... ib
3. Vessels and effects to pass free ......

ib
4. Visit of American merchantmen by Algerine ships of war-Amer'n ships of war meet-

ing Alg'e cruizers, &c-Ships, the property of citizens only entitled to passports&c. 480
5. Persons not to be taken out of American vessels, &c ...

ib
6. Strandleid vessels to receive assistance-Goods wrecked free of duty

ib
7. The Algerines not to sell vessels of war to enemies of the United States.

ib
8. Prizes bought of Algerines by Americans, not to be captured by the cruisers of the
regancy, then at sea, although they have not a passport

ib
9. Barbary powers, at war with the United States, not to sell prizes in Aigerinc ports..
10 American vessels may sell their prizes in ports of Algiers-Refreshments,

481
11. Presents of provisions to ships of war-Fugitive slaves, &c,

ib
12. Reslemprinn of slaves, Americans tak.on b’d en.ships &c.—Personal passports essen'lib
13. Effects of persons dying intestate, &c.—Valility of wills...
14. Freedom in buying goods—Consul not responsible for debts of citizens— The Dey
wanting to freight an American vessel &c......

ib
15. Dispates to be decided by the Dey - Disputes to be deculed by the Constil......

482
16. Killing or wounding an Algerine, &c....

ib
17. Security, liberty, and privileges of the American Consuls; religious indulgence, &c. ib
18. lu case of war, American citizens may embark, &c...

ib
19. Persons and property, captured on board enemy vessels, to be discharged.

ib
20. Salutes to be returned-Prı-sents of fresh provisions..

ib
21. Household articles of the consul, duty free......

483
22. Inquiry and reparation, to prevent war-Mutual promise to observe this treaty The

U. S. to pay ann'y 12,000 seq's: ($21,600.)-Vessels capid in future,to be released ib
2 Treaty of peace and amity, of June 30, 1815, concluded by commodore Decatur

and William Shaler, on the part of the United States of America, and his high-
ness Omar Pashaw, Dey of Algiers. Ratified by the President, by, and with
the advice and consent of the Senate, on the 26th December, 1815. ......... 484
1. Firth, inviolable, and universal peace and friendship-Favors in navigation and com-
merce granted to other nations, to be common 10 each, &c. page

484
4. Abolition of tribute in any form..

ib
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Art. S. American citizens to be delivered up-Subjects of Algiers delivered up without ransom 484
1. Indemnification to American citizens for detention and loss of property, &c.—Bales
of cotton and 10,000 dollars in lieu, page

ib
3. Enemies' property to pass free in the vessels of each party

495
0. Citizens or subjects taken on board enemy vessels to be liberated; and American citizens
and property not to be held captive or detained on any account

ib
7. Passports to vessels of either party: and right of visit restricted—O.Fenders to be pun-

ished for abusing the right of visit-Vessels of war of the United States to suffer
Algerine cruisers to pass, satisfied as to their consular Document

ib
8. Certificates of condemnation and bill of sale suficient passport for six months, in case
of purchase of prizes

486
9. Provisions to be furnished to the vessels of each party at market price~In case of re-
pair, cargoes may be landed without duty; no compulsion to land cargoes .

ib
10. When vessels are cast ashore in the territory of either party, assistance to be given to
the crews and protection to the property

i5
11. Vessels of either party to be protected within cannon shot, and in port; and an enemy
not permitted to pursue within 24 hours

ib
12. Commerce, protectinn to merchants, rights of establishing consuls, &e. on the foot-
ing of the most favored nations

ib
13. Consuls of the United States not responsible for debts of citizens

ib
14. Salutes to vessels of war of the U. States, as to the most favoreil nations-Christian

captives taking refuge on board American ships, of war, cannot be reclaimed 487
15. Protests arising from religious opinions not to interrupt harmony, &c.—Liberty to

to celebrate religious rights--Consuls may travel within the territories ofeach party ib
16. In case of dispute arising from violation of this Treaty, the grievances to be stałed, ani

tbree montis :lowed for an adjustment of differences- If war ensues, Consuls,
citizens, and subjects to be permitted to embark unmolested .

il
17. Prisoners of war not to be macie slaves, but to be exchanged, rank for rink, &c.

ib
18. Puwers at war with the US, not to be suffired to sell American captured ressels

at Algiers; but the vessels of war of the United Stiites may sell their prizes at Algiers, 488
19. Consul of the United Siates io decide disputes between American citizens, &c.-

Other disputes to be settled by the consuls or agents of the nations to which the
parties belong-Disputes between citizens of the United States and suljects of
Algiers to be decided by the Dey in person

ib
20. In case of killing, wounding, or striking, the law of the country to prevail, the consul
assisting out lire trial, and pranishments to be equal, sc.

ib
21. Consul of the United States not to ply duties on domestic articles

ib
22. Citizens of the U, States dying within the regeney of Algiers, the prinper"y to be un.

der the direction of the consul, unless otherwise disposed of by will; Il no consul,
the effects to be deposited, &c.--Dey, &c not to hinder (scention of a will ..489

RENEWED TREATY WITH ALGIERS,
Art. 3. Treaty of peace and amity, Dec. 23, 1816, concluded hy W. Shaler and I.

Chauncy on the part of the U. States, and the Dey and Regency of Algiers, p.469
1. Firm, perpetual, inviolable, and universal peace and friendship-Farors in navigation,
&c., granted to other nations, to be common to each

490
2 Abolition of liibute in any form

ib
3. American citizens to be delivered up-Subjects of Algiers to be delivered up without
for the excess of prisoners

iB
4. Indemnification of American citizens for detention and loss of property

ib
5. Enemies' property to pass free in the vessels of each party

491
6. Citizens or subjects of either party taken on board an enemy's vessels to be liberated

ib
7: Passports to vessels of either party, and right of visit restricted-Offenders to be

punished in the most exemplary manner, for abusing the right of risit-- Vessels

of war of the United States to suffer Algerine cruisers to pass, &c.

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Art. 8. Certificates of condemnation and bill of sale sufficient passport for six months, page 492
9. Provisions furnished at market price-In case of repair, cargoes may be lauded
without duty; but no compulsion to land cargoes

ib
10. Vessels cast ashore, assistance given to crews and protection to property

ib
11. Vessels within ganslot of forts to be defended, &c.

ib
12 Commerce, etc., on the most favored footing :

ib
15. Consuls of the United States, not responsible for debts of citizens, unless, &c. ib
11. Salutes, &c. on the most favored footing-Christian captives taking refuge, &c. ib
15. Pretext arising from religious opinions, not to interrupt harmony-Liberty to cele.
brate religious rights-Consuls may travel in the territories, &c

493
16. In case of disp'ites arising from a violation of this treaty, 3 months allowed for an ad-
justment of differences-In case of war, consuls &c., to embark &c.

ib
17. Prisoners of war not to be made slaves, but exchanged in twelve months

ib
15. Puwers at war with the United States, not to sell prizes at Algiers, but the vessels of
war of the United States may sell their prizes at Algiers

494
19. Consul of the United States to decide disputes hetween American citizens-Other

disputes setiled by the consuls or agents of which the parties belong-Disputes
between Americans and Algerines settled by the Dey in person

494
29. In case of killing or wounding the law of the country to prevail &c.

494
21. Coas il of the United States not to pay duties on domestic articles

494
2... Cizens of the United States dying within the regency of Algiers, their property to

be under the direction of the consul, unless otherwise disposed of by will, &c.
D.y not to hinder the execution of a will...

494
Article additional &c.- Part of the 18th article of the foregoing treaty annulled

495
Extinction of the government of Algiers by conquest, by the arms of France

495
Convention for the delivery of the forts and city of Algiers

497
AUSTRIA.
1. Treaty of connerce and navigation between the United States of America, and

his majesty the Emperor of Austria, concluded at Washington, on the 27th
day of August, 1829, by M. Van Buren, on the part of the United States, and
L. Baron de Lederer, on the part of Austria. Ratified at Washington, on the
10th day of February, 1831. •

530
dr. 1. Entire freedom of navigation– Negotiators—Reciprocal liberty of commerce
2 Tonnage duties &c. the same as the national vessels of both parties

ib
3. Duties &c. on the merchandize of each, to be the same
^ Duties fully applicable to both parties. 5. Import duties, to be imposeil &c. ib
Prohibi:ion to extend to all other nations

ib
6. Esports same 10 both—Exact reciprocity-- Bounties and drawbacks same to each 532
7. Coastwise navigation excepted. 8. Preference not to be given

ib
9. Particular farors to be cor.mon to both parties. 10. Liberty of consuls granted 535
11. Personal gnoils may be disposed of by testament or donation, &c., but not to affect

his majesty's laws, relative to emigration. 12. Treaty limited to ten years; &c.
Barbary Powers–See Algiers, Morocco, Tripoli and Tunis.

DEMARK.
1. General Convention of Friendship, Commerce and Navigation, between the

United States of America, and his majesty the King of Denmark; negotiated at
Washington, on the 26th April, 1826, by Henry Clay, on the part of the
of the United States, and Peter Pederson, on the part of Denmark. Conven-
tion to be in force ten years ...

448
Art. 1. Engage, mutually, not to grant favors in commerce which shall not be common to both ib
2 Navigation and commerce on the basis of perfect equality, and reciprocity .

448
3. Ciúzens, of either party not to pay higher duties in the ports of the other, on the
produce and manufactures of their own growth, than the most favored

449

530

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Art. 4. Reciprocal duties the basis of this treaty, page

448
5. Sound, or the Belt, duties, no higher than the most favored nations,

450
6. Iceland, the Ferroe Islands, and Greenland, possessions excep:ed in this article ib
7. Both parties may dispose of their effects, &c. on paying the usual duties

ib
8. Consuls and Vice Consuls received in all ports open to foreign commerce

450
9. Rights, privileges, and immunities of Consuls and Vice Consuls

451
10. Consuls, and persons attached to their service, exempt from military duty

ib
11. Convention to be in force for ten years,

ib
12. Convention to be approved of by the President, &c.

ib
Ratification. Addendum.

452
No. 2.-Convention between the United States of America and his Majesty the

King of Denmark, signed at Copenhagen, the 28th March, 1830.
Treaty of Indemnity. Negotiators.

453
Art. 1. Renunciation of American claims by Denmark,

454
And $650,000 to be paid to the citizens of the United States, 2. As follows,

ib
Interest to be added,

ib
1831, March, $216,666 67, Seplernber $216,666 67, 1832, September, $216,666 67 ib
3. Board of three Commissioners to decide on claims,

456
Documents to be delivered up by Denmark,

ib
4. Claims definitively settled, 5. Limited object of this treaty, 6. Ratification, 458

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FRANCE.
1. Treaty of amity and commerce, of the 6th of February, 1778, negotiated at Paris,

by C. A. Gerard, on the part of France, and B. Franklin, Silas Deane, and
Arthur Lee, on the part of the United States. Ratified by Congress on the 4th
of May, 1778. Annulled by act of July 7, 1798.....
Rules relative to correspondence and commerce to be established

jb
Each party at liberty respecting interior regulations, &c. and to admit other nations to a
participation of the same advantages.

ib
Art. 1. Firm and inviolable peace, and true and sincere friendship beween both parties

ib
2. Favors of commerce, &c. granted to other nations, to be common to bo'li

56
3. Freuch subjects to enjoy in U.S. ports the same benefits as the most favored nations.. ib
4. C. States citizens to enjoy in the porls of France, in Europe, the same benefits ... ib
5. Exemption of 190 sols. p. tun, excepi, &c-U.S. may establish countervailing duties ib
6. Vessels belonging to U. S. to be protected in French ports, &c. ......
7. French vessels to be protected by the armed vessels of the United States..

ib
8. France to employ its good oflices with the Barbary powers in behalf of the U.S...
9. Fishing reciprocally prohibited to each par,y, in places occupied by the other.

40
The fishing exclusion to be governed by indulgences granted to other nations .....
10. The rights of France to be respected, by the U. States, with respect to fishing near
Newfoundland, as established by the treaties of Utrecht and Paris ......

ib
11. U. S. citizens exempt from escheat, dying aliens in France—the like privilege to be
enjoyed by French subjects dying within the U. States...

ib
12. Suspected ships entering ports of an enemy, compelled to exhibit their papers. 42
13. Mode of proceeding, in relation to vessels having on board contraband goods .... ib
14. Goods belonging to the citizens or subjects of either party, on board enemy ves-

sels liable to confiscation, &c. ...
15. Mutual guarantee against injuries from the armed vessels of either party

ib
16. Ships and merchandise rescued from piratcs to be restored ..........

ib
17. Free entrance allowed to prizes made by either party, into each other's ports.

46
Enemy cruisers against one party not allowed to remain in ports of the other .

ib
18. Relief to be granted, by each party, to the shipwrecked vessels of the other.

jb
19. Citizens & cubjects, of either party,obliged,by necessity, to take refuge in others portsib

ib

50

52

60

Art. 20. Sis months allowed after the declaration of war, between the parties, for the saic

and transportation of the property of their citizens or subjects, page......... 46
21. The citizens of each party prohibited from taking commissions from a third party to
cruise against each other.....

48
22. Foreign privateers, at enmity with one of the parties, not be allowed to fit their ships
or sell prizes in the United States o: France ...

ib
23. Free trade allowed to one party with the enemy of the o:her--free ships make free
goods—all persons on board, except soldiers, to be protected ...

ib
24. Contraband of war designated_descrimnation as to goods not contraband...
25. In case of war, sea-letters, passports, aud certificates, to be furnished, &c. .....
26. Optional, with vessels of either party, in the ports of the other, to unload.

ib
27. The visit of an armed ship, of either party, meeting a merchantman of one of the par-

ties at sea, to be made in a boat manned by two or three men only, the armed ves-
sel remaining out of reach of cannon shot ......

54
28. Search of goods to take place before they are put on board

ib
20. Erch party allowed to have consuls in the ports of the other

ib
30. Free ports to be allowed in France to V. States citizens, who may continue to trade
to the free ports in the West Indies ......

ib
31. Ratificatious to be exchanged in six montis.

56
Roscioded articles

ib
2. Of alliance, of the 6th of February, 1773, negotiated at Paris by C. A. Gerard,

on the part of France, and B. Franklin, Silas Deane, and Arthur Lee. Ratified
by Congress on the 4th May, 1778. Annulled by act of July 7, 1798.... page 60
Male to cement the mutual interests, and to guard against British hosility towards

France, either in commerce or navigation, in a manner contrary to the rights of'na.

tions-union of efforts and councils
Art. 1. In case of war between France and Great Britain, the cause to be cominon ........ ib
2. The main object of the alliance declared to be to in vintain the absolute independence
of the United States of America

ib
3. Eich party to act as it may deem proper to the annoyanee of the common enemy

ib
4. Both parties to act in concert; and a convention to regulate amount of succour ...... ib
5. British possessions in Americi, or Bermuda, if reduced, to buong to the U. Stales ... 62
6. Renunciation of all claim, by France, to the North American possessions and the Ber.

mudas; which prior to the treaty of 1763, or by that treaty, were acknowledged to
belong to the British crown

ib
7. France to possess islands taken in or ne:r the Mexican guilt.....

ib
8 Neither party to make peace, without the consent of tl.e other-Arms not to be laidh

dow, until the inelependence of the C. States shall have been secured by treaty
that shall terminate the war ......

ib
9. No after claims, whatever may be the event of the war ......

ib
10. Other powers may be invited 10 m::ke common cause against G. Britain

ib
11. Murual guarantee of possessions and sovereignty ....

64
12 Explanation of the extent of the mutual guarantee of possessions and sovereign'y... ib
3. Contract concerning the loin and repayment of money, of the 16th of July, 1782,

made at Versailles, by Gravier de Vergennes, on the part of France, and B.
Franklin, on the part of the United States. Ratified by Congress, January 22,
1783. Obsolete. ...

66
Motives for making a particular statement of the amount of pecuniary aid furnished by

the French government and the manner of repayment by the U. S of America 66
Art. 1. Amount and items of the various loans, at 5 per cent. interest.

ib
2. Loans to be repaid in 12 equal annual instalments

67
3. Abatement of interest ....

ib
4. Interest to diminish in proportion to payments, which may be anticipated

68
5. Loan male by France, in the Netherlands acknowledged io be for the use of the U.S. ib

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