Poems, Volume 1

Sampul Depan
E. Moxon, 1851 - 168 halaman
 

Apa yang dikatakan orang - Tulis resensi

Kami tak menemukan resensi di tempat biasanya.

Edisi yang lain - Lihat semua

Istilah dan frasa umum

Bagian yang populer

Halaman xl - Shaped by himself with newly-learned art; A wedding or a festival, A mourning or a funeral; And this hath now his heart, And unto this he frames his song: Then will he fit his tongue To dialogues of business, love, or strife; But it will not be long Ere this be thrown aside, And with new joy and pride The little actor cons another part ; Filling from time to time his
Halaman 153 - Earth fills her lap with pleasures of her own ; Yearnings she hath in her own natural kind, And, even with something of a Mother's mind, And no unworthy aim, The homely Nurse doth all she can To make her Foster-child, her Inmate Man, Forget the glories he hath known, And that imperial palace whence he came. Behold the Child among his new-born blisses, A six years...
Halaman xvi - Thou art a Dew-drop, which the morn brings forth, 111 fitted to sustain unkindly shocks ; Or to be trailed along the soiling earth ; A gem that glitters while it lives, And no forewarning gives ; But, at the touch of wrong, without a strife Slips in a moment out of life.
Halaman lxix - As high as we have mounted in delight In our dejection do we sink as low; To me that morning did it happen so; And fears and fancies thick upon me came; Dim sadness—and blind thoughts, I knew not, nor could name.
Halaman 149 - mid cloisters dim, And saw nought lovely but the sky and stars. But thou, my babe ! shalt wander like a breeze By lakes and sandy shores, beneath the crags Of ancient mountain, and beneath the clouds Which image in their bulk both lakes and shores And mountain crags: so shalt thou see and hear The lovely shapes and sounds intelligible Of that eternal language, which thy God Utters, who from eternity doth teach Himself in all, and all things in Himself.
Halaman xviii - And think that thou shalt learn far other lore, And in far other scenes ! For I was reared In the great city, pent 'mid cloisters dim, And saw nought lovely but the sky and stars.
Halaman xvi - Thou faery Voyager ! that dost float In such clear water, that thy Boat May rather seem To brood on air than on an earthly stream ; Suspended in a stream as clear as sky, Where earth and heaven do make one imagery ; 0 blessed Vision ! happy Child ! That art so exquisitely wild, 1 think of thee with many fears For what may be thy lot in future years.
Halaman lxix - All things that love the sun are out of doors; The sky rejoices in the morning's birth; The grass is bright with rain-drops; — on the moors The hare is running races in her mirth; And with her feet she from the plashy earth Raises a mist, that, glittering in the sun Runs with her all the way, wherever she doth run.
Halaman xvi - O THOU! whose fancies from afar are brought; Who of thy words dost make a mock apparel, And fittest to unutterable thought The breeze-like motion and the self-born carol ; Thou faery Voyager ! that dost float In such clear water, that thy Boat May rather seem To brood on air than on an earthly stream ; Suspended in a stream as clear as sky, Where earth and heaven do make one imagery ; 0 blessed Vision ! happy Child...
Halaman 159 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renowned, But such as at this day to Indians known In Malabar or Deccan spreads her arms Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillared shade High overarched, and echoing walks between...

Informasi bibliografi