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average price of Strict Low Middling 1-1/16”, American white cotton computed from official daily quotations of cotton exchanges in designated markets. The annual averages are season or crop-year averages of monthly data for the year of growth, August through July. The 10 markets effective August 1, 1974 are Greenville, South Carolina; Augusta, Georgia; Montgomery, Alabama; Memphis, Tennessee; Greenwood, Mississippi; Dallas, Houston, and Lubbock, Texas; Phoenix, Arizona; and Fresno, California. For data prior to August 1, 1974, the average includes Atlanta, Georgia, and prior to November 1, 1973, Little Rock, Arkansas.

The season average beginning 1971 and the monthly average beginning August 1971 are in terms of 480-pound net weight bales and are not directly comparable with earliers prices in gross weight bales; see note 9 for this page. Effective August 1, 1973, the base quality grade used in spot market quotations was changed to grade 41 staple 34 from grade 31 staple 32 (Middling 1”).

Monthly prices for August 1947-December 1970 (gross weight basis) are available upon request. Market prices shown in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS cover the base quality in effect. 4

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data relate to cotton system spinning spindles (which do not include spindles for spinning uncut top); data for spindles spinning manmade and other fibers and blends are included.

Figures for active spindles refer to number active (for the shift during which the largest number of spindles was operated) on the last working day of the period covered. The Bureau's monthly cotton statistics represent operations for 4 and 5 weeks. The 5-week periods are as follows: For 1971 and 1972, March, June, September, and December cover 5 weeks except that for 1972, November is the 5-week period; for 1973 and 1974, January, April, July, and October cover 5 weeks; other months are for 4 weeks.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for August 1945-December 1970 (and data prior to August 1945 relating to spindles consuming 100 percent cotton only) are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, as computed from data compiled by the Bureau of the Census. Cotton cloth foreign trade data at source are reported in varying units (e.g., square yards or pounds) and in considerable detail for the many kinds of fabric. The summary trend series shown here are calculated in terms of the raw cotton equivalent of the various cloths and expressed in bales of 480 pounds net weight.

U.S. domestic exports cover standard constructions of cloth, tire cord, tapestry, upholstery fabrics, table damask and pile fabrics (in addition to the cloth representation, the total includes cotton equivalent of small quantities of cotton yarn, twine and cordage, and thread). Imports for consumption cover the same products except that table damask and pile fabrics (grouped in the original reports with manufactures of such fabrics) are not included, Also excluded are manufactured products (housing furnishings, apparel, etc.).

Beginning 1965, exports are classified according to the revised Export Schedule B, January 1, 1965 and subsequent editions, and may not be strictly comparable with earlier figures. Effective 1963, imports are classified according to the Tariff Schedules of the United States and may not be directly comparable with earlier figures. The USDA report, Cotton and Wool Situation, provides separate figures (in pounds) for yarn, thread, cloth, and manufactures by product.

Monthly data for 1965-70 are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS; (see reference note, p. 1 of this section); monthly data for July 1959-December 1964 are in Statistics on Cotton and Related Data, 1930-67 (March 1968), and Supplement, U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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Season average (net weight bale basis). Beginning August 1971, prices are quotations on 480-pound net weight bale basis (earlier prices are on 500-pound gross weight bale basis); to compute comparable prices for previous months, multiply farm price by the factor, 1.04167, and market price by 1.0438. It is estimated that about one cent of the price increase-from July to August 1971 - was caused by conversion of the price quotations.

10 Preliminary season average for 1974 related to the average price for sales prior to April 1, 1975.

11 Less than 500 bales.

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Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. The data are derived from the Bureau's quarterly survey, Broadwoven Fabrics (Gray, Except Knit): Form MQ-22T. The figures represent total production of cotton fabrics by all known weaving mills regardless of their primary activity. Data for 1947 and 1954 are from the Census of Manufactures. Production of tire cord and fabric is excluded.

Effective with 1951, production of broadwoven mixed goods is classified according to chief fiber content by weight. Therefore, cotton fabrics are wholly or chiefly by weight of cotton (a fabric, 40 percent cotton, 30 percent rayon, and 30 percent acetate, is classified as manmade fiber fabric). Blends and mixtures, by weight 50 percent of one fiber and 50 percent of another fiber, are classified according to the fiber of greatest value (a fabric 50 percent polyester and 50 percent cotton, is a manmade fiber fabric). A fabric containing 5 percent or less of a second fiber is classifed as being 100 percent of the first fiber (a wool fabric containing 5 percent or less silk fiber is classified as a 100 percent wool fabric).

The original reports show production by type of goods for print-cloth yarn fabrics, sheeting and allied coarse and medium yarn fabrics, fine cotton fabrics, colored yarn fabrics, toweling and dishcloth fabric, and other classes by type of fabric for these goods.

Annual data prior to 1947 and quarterly data for 1942-70 are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

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Source: American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. The data are based on reports from manufacturers whose production currently represents from 85 to 90 percent of the cotton gray goods industry.

The orders and inventories (at cotton mills) are expressed in terms of number of weeks' equivalent current production. They are not adjusted for seasonal variation, including those resulting from holidays, vacation periods, etc. Thus, high ratios in certain months, such as July and December, are largely because of seasonally low production schedules. Annual data in this volume are averages of the twelve end-of-month figures.

Monthly data for 1957-70 (except for the ratio) are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section); monthly data for the ratio for 1969-70 are in the 1973 volume. Monthly data for orders and stocks, in terms of equivalent production (1947-56), and for the ratio (1953-68) are available upon

Source: Textile Economics Bureau, Inc.; published in Textile Organon. Data represent industry totals, as specified.

The rayon and acetate yarn and monofilaments group covers industrial rayon yarn and textile rayon yarn and monofilaments, and acetate, including diacetate and triacetate. The noncellulosic (except glass) category covers-for yarns and monofilaments-nylon and aramid, olefin (polyethylene and polypropylene) yarn and monofilaments and film fiber, polyester, saran, spandex, vinyon, TFE-fluorocarbon (and small quantities of other types for some years); for staple, tow and fiberfill) nylon and aramid, acrylic and modacrylic, polyester, and other types. Textile glass refers to continuous strand and staple sliver and excludes figures for blown glass wool and pack for filtration in insulation, etc. Waste is not included in any of the series shown.

The Textile Organon provides a quarterly supply account: production, shipments (domestic and export), stocks, imports, etc., for yarns and filaments and for staple by major fibers, and periodic reviews of U.S. producing capacity and world fiber output.

Annual data prior to 1947, quarterly data for 1951-70 (noncellulosic stocks and glass fiber production and stocks, 1959-70), and rayon and acetate end-of-month stocks (1938-70) are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Quarterly revisions for 1965-66 appear in the note in the 1971 volume.

Textile glass fiber production, not shown separately in the above-mentioned volumes for the period 1951-58, may be derived by subtracting from total fiber production the data shown for component items; end-of-quarter stocks (1953-58) for noncellulosic fibers and textile glass are available upon request. 2

Beginning 1958, figures exlude data for acetate staple and tow which are included for earlier years. Estimates of acetate staple 1955-74 are as follows (millions of pounds): 58, 57; 54; 75; 70; 60; 53; 46; 60; 60; 54; 60; 50; 50; 43; 35; 26; 28; 25; 20.

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Sources: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, beginning 1964, and Modern Textile Magazine (annual data 1955-63), as summarized in the U.S. Department of Agriculture report, Cotton Situation.

Specifications for the BLS price read as follows: Polyester staple fiber, 1.5 denier, all lengths, semi-dull luster, crimp, all spinning systems, manufacturer to converter or mill, f.o.b. mill, or delivered. The average price is based on quotations for 1 day each month (usually about the 15th).

Monthly data for 1964-70 are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

Monthly data back to 1961 are available upon request.

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Prices for all periods are for filament yarn, viscose, 150 denier, manufacturer's price to weaver, f.o.b. shipping point, with freight adjustments.

For the period 1964-August 1970, the basic data are derived from different sources and average prices shown beginning 1964 are not comparable with data through 1963 or with prices beginning September 1970. Price indexes for this commodity (which are adjusted for comparability from period to period by BLS) show there was no change in the level of prices for the period 1960 to mid-1965. Therefore, average prices for 1960-63, comparable with 1964, would be $0.78 per pound. Effective September 1970, prices are again averages from different sources and, therefore, are not comparable with prices prior to September 1970.

Through 1951 the data are averages of quotations for 1 day each week. Thereafter, they are based on quotations for 1 day each month (usually around the 15th).

Monthly data for 1949-70 are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section); monthly data for 1947-48 are available upon request. Annual and monthly prices prior to 1947 for 150 denier viscose yarn, specified in skeins, are in the 1949 and earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS and in the November 1941 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS (p. 22, table 30).

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. The figures represent the entire production by all known weaving mills (regardless of their primary activity) of broadwoven fabrics, over 12” in width, of manmade fibers, silk and silk mix tures, paper, and other specialty fabrics. The data are derived from the Census quarterly survey, Broadwoven Fabrics (Gray, Except Knit): Form M22T.

Effective with data for 1964, the Census revised the presentation of manmade fiber fabrics production by fabric classification. No comparable quarterly data prior to 1964 for the separate categories are available. The difference between total production and the sum of data for filament, spun, and mixed-yarn fabric combinations (shown separately on this page and on p. 180) covers blanketing, silk, paper, and other specialty fabrics. The difference between the total 100 percent filament yarn (including drapery fabrics) series and the detail shown for rayon and/or acetate and nylon fabrics covers all other filament yarn goods, including glass fiber, polyester, saran, and olefin fiber fabrics.

Beginning 1951, all broadwoven goods are classified according to principal fiber content. Manmade fiber goods are defined as those containing 51 percent or more of manmade fiber by weight. Prior to 1951, the figures exclude mixed manmade fiber fabrics containing as much as 25 percent (or more) of wool, whereas beginning 1951, production also covers yardage of chiefly manmade fiber fabrics produced on woolen and worsted looms.

The original reports show production by type of fabric and fiber, yarn consumed by type of yarn, number of looms in place, and loom hours operated.

Annual data prior to 1947 and quarterly data prior to 1971 for total manmade fiber fabrics, and quarterly data for 1964-70 for all series are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

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ce: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Specifications effective March 1971 are as follows: Acrylic spun yarn, 2/20, 3-6 denier, semi-dull luster, on cones or skeins, manufacturer to knitter, f.o.b. New York area or mill, or freight paid. Specifications for prices prior to March 1971 are for yarn on cones and skeins, to knitter or wholesaler, etc. The average price is based on quotations for 1 day each month (usually around the 15th).

Monthly data for 1965-70 are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section); no monthly data prior to 1965 are available. 6

Source: American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc., calculated from data published in “Woven Fabrics: Production, Inventories, and Unfilled Orders,” M22A, U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.

The original end-of-month inventories and unfilled orders (based on reports from weaving mills) on which the ratio is calculated are intended to measure monthly trends for woven fabrics. Knit fabric is not included. The data refer to broadwoven fabric, over 12 inches in width, chiefly of manmade fiber by weight (blends and mixtures which are 50 percent of one fiber and 50 percent of another are classified according to the fiber of greatest value). Unfilled orders (quantity of open orders for fabrics which have not been billed) include orders received from outside customers as well as weaving orders from the finishing and converting department of the reporting company. Inventories owned by weaving mills include fabrics woven commission. Excluded are inventories billed and held for others.

Monthly data for 1965-70 are shown below.

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Manmade fiber Gray Goods: Ratio of Inventories to Unfilled Orders.

Source: Compiled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. For a general description of foreign trade statistics, see note 1 for p. 109. Imports and exports of manmade fiber manufactures are compiled and reported originally by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, in varying units or measures. The ERS, in cooperation with other agencies, developed factors for converting the various commodities (as reported in pounds, number, dozen, square yards, etc.) into approximate quantities of manmade fiber consumed in their manufacture (including an adjustment for waste).

The "tops, yarn, cloth, etc." group includes, in addition to woven cloth, the fiber equivalent of products made from spun yarns, tire cord and tire cord fabric, and waste; “primarily manufactured products" covers apparel, house furnishings, knit or crocheted fabrics, and other manufactures. The apparel group omits imports of manmade fiber apparel decorated with lace, embroideries, edgings, insertions, etc., which are included in the “primarily manufactured products" total.

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(see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Monthly prices for the territory wool (1913-40), the graded fleece (1924-48), and the former Australian wook (1929-40) are available upon request.

Knit apparel includes outerwear, underwear, gloves, hosiery, and hats. The data do not cover raw (unmanufactured) textile fibers, and do not include imports of certain textured yarns. For the period 1967-74, annual imports of these yarns (not adjusted for waste) were as follows (millions of pounds-manmade fiber equivalent): 1.9; 10.2; 7.5; 67.0; 136.5; 118.0; 90.0; 38.5. Annual totals are calculated independently. Therefore, the monthly data may not add to the annual totals.

The figures are summarized from the ERS “Cotton and Wool Situation,” which provides greater detail by product group. Annual data back to 1920 and monthly data back to mid-1959 appear in USDA Statistical Bulletins No. 535 (Oct. 1974) and No. 417 (March 1968), “Statistics on Cotton and Related Data," and the 1969 Supplement to No. 417 (January 1970).

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Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data represent totals for the industry, as noted, and are derived from the quarterly survey, Broadwoven Fabrics (Gray, Except Knit). All data omit production of woven felts. Beginning 1972, the data exclude apparel fabrics for government orders; for the period 1967-71, production of apparel fabric for government use was as follows (millions of finished linear yards): 9.9; 5.7; 7.4; 6.1; 0.7. Effective 1951, the production of broadwoven goods is classified according to principal fiber content by weight. The figures beginning 1951 therefore exclude fabrics containing from 25.0 to 49.9 percent wool, which are included in earlier data. Blends and mixtures which are by weight 50 percent of one fiber and 50 percent of another fiber are classified according to the fiber of the greater value.

The original report, MQ-22T.3, provides detailed figures for woolen and for worsted apparel fabrics; for men's and boys' and for women's and children's goods by weight of fabric; for blanketing and other nonapparel fabrics; as well as for woven felts.

Annual data prior to 1947 and quarterly data for 1942-70 are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

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Effective 1958, data are not comparable with earlier figures because of reclassification of items. For example, beginning 1958, data for woven cloth omit exports of tire cord and tire cord fabric which are included in cloth exports for earlier years (for 1958-61, exports of tire cord and fabric averaged 20 million pounds--manmade fiber equivalent--per year.) Also, for 1952-57, “total yarn and cloth, etc.," includes exports of items (which averaged less than 5 million pounds per year) that are not covered in other years.

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Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data are based on a monthly survey of establishments nsuming domestic and foreign raw wool (shorn and pulled wool of the sheep) on the woolen spinning and worsted systems. Estimates are included for respondents reporting on an annual basis. Not included are tops, noils, etc., mohair, alpaca, vicuna, and other wool, except shorn or pulled, reused and reprocessed wool consumed in woolen system spinning, and wool consumed in cotton system spinning.

The monthly consumption figures represent 4- and 5-week reporting periods as follows: For 1971 and 1972, March, June, September, and December cover 5 weeks, except that for 1972, November is the 5-week month; for 1973 and 1974, January, April, July, and October cover 5 weeks; other months are for 4 weeks.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1934-70 are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Monthly figures for apparel class wool for 1932-33 are available in the 1936 edition; for 1918-34, on p. 20 of the July 1935 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS.

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Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. The data represent the entire U.S. shipments of woven, tufted, needle-punched, knitted, braided, hooked, and other types of rugs and carpeting shipped during the period, including transfers to other divisions of the reporting company; estimates are included for nonreporting firms. Excluded are products fabricated from carpeting or roll goods not manufactured in the reporting establishment.

The original Current Industrial Report, Carpet and Rugs, MQ-220, shows detailed shipments in terms of yardage and dollar value by type of rug, and quantities of yarns and fabrics consumed in their manufacture by type of fiber. For the period shown, the number of reporting units has increased-specifically, effective 1970 and effective 1972-with the introduction of updated mailing lists. The Census has adjusted previously published shipments back to 1968 for comparability with current estimates. Data prior to 1968 are not directly comparable.

Quarterly shipments for 1968-70 are as follows:

Rugs, Carpets, and Carpeting: Shipments, 1968-70

Millions of square yards

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, from records of the Bureau of the Census. Data are imports for consumption. For definitions and other pertinent foreign trade information, see note 1 for p. 109. The total covers unmanufactured (raw) wool of the sheep, regardless of condition (on the skin, in the grease or washed, scoured or carbonized), converted to a clean-yield basis. Animal hairs (except hair of the camel as noted below) are excluded.

Duty-free wools cover Donskoi, Smyrna, and similar wools without merino or English blood and, for 1947-58, also other wools (not finer than 40's) and camel hair (duty-free when imported for use in the manufacture of rugs, carpets, and a few other specified products). In addition, beginning mid-1958, the duties were suspended on graded wools finer than 40's but not finer than 46's when imported for use in the manufacture of these items. Beginning September 1963, imports are summarized in accordance with the U.S. Tariff Schedules and may not be directly comparable with imports through August 1963.

Annual totals prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1963-70 are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS; monthly data for 1948-62 are in the U.S. Department of Agriculture report, Wool Statistics and Related Data, 1920-64, Statistical Bulletin No. 363 (July 1965).

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Source: National Association of Hosiery Manufacturers, Inc. Data are estimated industry totals for all types of men's, women's, children's, and infants' hosiery. Estimates are based primarily on reports received regularly from knitting mills that produce a majority of all types of hosiery made in the United States.

Annual reports of the Association provide monthly production, shipments, and end-of-year stocks by type, by fiber, and by size; annual production by geographic areas; and hosiery imports and exports by type, fiber, and by country.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1934-70 are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. Prices are for shorn wool from the reporting service of that agency and are based on the mean of weekly ranges of quotations in the Weekly Review of the Boston Wool Market.

The Australian price excludes duty. Beginning 1970, the data refer to a substituted price series and are not comparable with earlier figures. The substituted price, 64's, warp and 1/2 warp, replaces the former series as follows: Australina, 64's, 70's, good topmaking, in bond.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1941-70 (1949-70 for graded fleece) are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Annual totals, except for the most current year, are from the “Apparel Survey,” MA23A, and represent cuttings by establishments accounting for about 99 percent of the output of the items listed. The monthly data (from “Men's Apparel,” M23B) are based on a sample of establishments accounting for about 90 percent of output. Generally in the past, the monthly data, except for the most current year, have been adjusted to the annual levels. But at this time, the revised monthly figures for 1972 and 1973 are not available. Production (cuttings) includes reports from jobbers reporting output made from their materials; operations of contractors producing garments for other companies are not covered. (Also excluded are small quantities of garments cut as secondary products by establishments primarily producing other apparel and accessories.) Figures for Alaska and Hawaii are included beginning 1958.

Based on comparison of reports received from the 1972 Census of Manufactures, the Bureau expanded the Apparel Survey for 1973 to include additional establishments and made changes in some product classifications, etc. Data were also received for 1972, but all figures shown prior to 1972 are not directly comparable. Other breaks in comparability are noted in the shirts and slacks series.

Suits include formal wear; separate coats cover suit-type coats (including separate formal wear); shirts exclude work shirts and cover street, business, dress (with collar bands, neck sizes, sleeve lengths, and shirt tails), and casual-wear shirts (without collar bands, sized S-M-L-XL). As specifically noted, shirts also include knit outerwear sport shirts. Separate dress and sport trousers exclude all walking shorts, separate uniform trousers, and jeans-cut slacks. Casual slacks (jeans-cut): For this category, data prior to 1970 (shown in italics) cover dungarees, waistband overalls, and "jeans"; annual data for 1970-71 and monthly data for 1971-72 also cover work pants and jeans-cut slacks; annual figures for 1972-74 and monthly data for 1973-74 refer only to the casual jeans-cut slacks.

The Apparel Survey for 1973, MA23A (December 1974) and the Supplement, MA23A (March 1975) provide 1972-73 monthly and annual figures for women's, misses', and juniors' selected apparel; these data are not presently available for 1974. 8

Yardage is in millions of finished linear yards: Blanketing in 72-inch width or equivalent; other fabrics, 54- to 60-inch widths or equivalent 54-inch width.

products, reports are submitted on a plant or division basis, and relate to the plant or division manufacturing these products. Prior to 1961 (for backlog, prior to December 31, 1960), the figures were based on reports from companies active in manufacturing complete aircraft, aircraft engines, and aircraft propellers and include, for these companies, operations on missiles and space vehicles. The expanded coverage in 1961 brings within the scope of the survey those companies producing, assembling, developing, or having prime system responsibility for complete missiles, space vehicles, and engines or propulsion units for missiles and space vehicles. The reporting panel for the survey has been increased by one-third. For backlog, the 1960 yearend total derived from the more comprehensive survey is higher by over 20 percent; this difference is accounted for chiefly by the larger number of respondents included in the survey for 1961.

Beginning 1961, new orders reflect an unduplicated total since all companies report separately their net new orders received for prime contracts and subcontracts. Under the former survey, airframe producers were required to report the value of major subcontracts let to other airframe producers. All series for U.S. Government represent prime contracts only. Net new orders represent new orders received during the period less terminations during the period. Beginning 1968, value of new orders and backlog generally includes only those orders that are supported by binding legal documents, such as signed contracts, letters of award or intent; comparable data for 1967 (millions of dollars): New orders, 26,279; backlog, end of period, 29,339.

Data for "other related operations, products, and services” include all conversions, modifications, site activation, other aerospace products (including drones) and services, and receipts for applied research and development of items such as drones, etc. Receipts for other applied research are included with figures for the respective reporting categories. See also note 3 for this page.

Quarterly figures for 1948-70 are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section and p. 325 of the 1957 edition). Quarterly data (1963-67) for total new orders and backlog comparable with 1968 (i.e., on a funded basis) are available upon request.

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Data for U.S. Government new orders and sales (1948-60) and backlog (1948-59) cover complete aircraft, engines, propellers, and parts and exclude figures for “other products and services”; for these periods, the value of "other products and services” for U.S. Government is included in the respective totals shown for new orders, sales, and backlog.

Total includes backlog for nonrelated products and services and all basic research not included in categories shown separately.

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Beginning 1951, figures exclude production of fabrics containing from 25.0 to 49.9 percent wool; see note 4 for this page.

11 Includes cuttings of men's dress (or walking) shorts not covered in other years; such cuttings totaled 4,972,000 units in 1961 and 7,444,000 units in 1962.

12 Not comparable with earlier data; see note 2 for this page regarding change in import duties.

13 Not comparable with earlier data; see note 2 for this page regarding change in commodity classification schedules.

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Beginning 1970, data refer to a different price series and are not comparable with earlier figures; see note 3 for this page.

15 For 1970 and 1971 (and 1971 and 1972 monthly data), data refer to jeans-cut casual slacks, dungarees, waistband overalls, and work pants, and are not comparable with production for other periods shown. According to the 1973 annual Apparel Survey, in 1972, cuttings of these types of apparel totaled 19,263 thousand dozens.

16 Effective with annual data beginning 1972 and monthly data beginning 1973, the data are limited to casual jeans-cut slacks only, but the Bureau states that definitional problems do exist. For the period January-July 1974, these cuttings may be overstated by from 2 to 5 percent.

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As noted, the shirts category, effective with annual data for 1972 and monthly data beginning 1973, also covers knit outerwear sport shirts (from knitting mills); annual cuttings of these shirts in 1972 and 1973 totaled 13,248 and 14,104 thousand dozens. Other sport shirts included in the total annual figures are, for 1972, 8,811, and 1973, 8,665 thousand dozens; dress and business shirts account for the remainder. For January-July 1974, cuttings of dress and business shirts, included in the total, may be overstated by from 5 to 10 percent.

Sources: U.S. Department of Commerce (Bureau of the Census) and Department of Transportation (Federal Aviation Agency). Data represent complete coverage of companies reporting shipments of complete civilian aircraft, i.e., including engines, and excluding aircraft shipped to U.S. military customers. Military-type planes shipped to foreign governments are included. The value of shipments does not include value of spare parts that are shipped with the aircraft. Airframe weight is the weight of the empty airplane less the weight of components (such as turbo superchargers, engine, propeller, wheels, accessories, etc.).

Monthly data for 1953-70 are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section); monthly data for 1951-52 for value of shipments are available upon request. Monthly data for dollar shipments (1947-50) and airframe weight (1946-52) may be obtained from the original reports, Complete Aircraft and Aircraft Engines, CIR, M377.

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Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Effective January 1965 exports are summarized according to the January 1, 1965 edition of the export Schedule B and cover the following types of nonmilitary aircraft: Commercial and civilian aircraft including passenger, cargo, and combination transports, personal and utility types, rotary wing, rebuilt, used, modified, converted, and demilitarized planes. Data for all periods exclude gliders, trainers, seaplanes, and lighter-than-air aircraft. Prior to 1950, military-type planes are included. Beginning 1949 all aircraft classified as special category for security reasons are omitted; types subsequently released from this category are included. (For example beginning 1952 exports include used, rebuilt, and demilitarized aircraft.) For the period 1958-64, exports of new commercial cargo transports were not listed

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Sources: Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association of the United States, Inc. and U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Sales and inventories (p. 184) of franchised dealers of all domestic new passenger cars in the United States are derived from data as reported by members of the Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association of the United States. Retail sales are broadly defined as units reported by dealers as being delivered to consumers based on receipt of retail sales cards. Figures for domestics include U.S.-type cars produced in Canada; excluded from the domestics series are cars produced by U.S. manufacturers outside the United States (except Canada). Import car sales are compiled by BEA from industry sources. Data for imports cover all foreign-type cars as well as captive imports (vehicles manufactured overseas by U.S. subsidiaries); excluded from the imports series are U.S.-type cars produced in Canada.

The ratios of end-of-month inventories to total monthly sales (p. 184) are calculated from seasonally adjusted data. The annual ratios are calculated by dividing the seasonally adjusted inventories (the average of end-of-month volume for the past 24 months) by the average monthly sales for the current year.

Monthly data for 1958-70 for series marked with a star appear in the appendix to this volume; for domestics, monthly data for 1958-66 appear in the December 1970 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS, P. 43; monthly data for 1967-70 are in the 1973 and 1971 editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS. Monthly data for total cars and for imports for 1966-70 as shown in the aforementioned volumes do not reflect scattered revisions which are available upon request.

Total for 1st and 2d quarters of 1950.

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10

Total for 3d and 4th quarters of 1951.

°Beginning 1952, data include aircraft formerly classified “special category"; see note 5 for this page.

11 Not comparable with data shown in italics; see 2d paragraph of note 1 for this page.

12 Revisions are not available for components of the adjusted total backlog as of December 31, 1960.

13

Backlog as of December 31, 1961; backlog as of January 1, 1962 is $14,147 million. The difference between the two figures is due to an increase in the number of companies covered in the survey and to revisions of previously reported data; no revisions for components of the revised total backlog as of January 1 are available.

14 Beginning 1965, under the revised Export Schedule, data may not be strictly comparable with figures for earlier years.

15 Beginning 1968, orders and backlog on funded basis; see 3d paragraph of note 1 for this page.

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Source: Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association of the United States, Inc. Factory sales (from plants located in the United States) represent almost complete coverage of the industry. Although sometimes interpreted as being identical with production, factory sales data generally refer to vehicles shipped and sold, or billed to customers, dealers, or allied divisions, whereas production data refer to number of units leaving the assembly lines. Units are counted produced whether ready to ship or not. (For a given period, monthly production data are available a month earlier than figures for factory sales; production data are shown for the most current month in each issue of the SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS.) Export sales account for the difference between domestic and total sales. Sales of vehicles to Federal Government agencies are included (effective July 1964, all tactical vehicles are excluded; prior to this period, certain firms included such types). Production data include tactical vehicles. Excluded from the data shown here are separate sales figures from plants located in Canada.

Passenger cars also include factory sales of taxicabs, station wagons, ambulances, and funeral cars as well as passenger carriers used as school buses which are made on passenger car chassis.

Trucks and buses include sales of trucks, truck tractors, and all buses (primarily those of the integral type) sold to for-hire transportation companies for city or intercity service. Also included are special types of coaches, e.g., integral school buses if made with coach chassis or truck chassis. Station wagons and fire apparatus made with truck chassis are included; fire apparatus made by companies specializing in that line is excluded. Data for trucks and buses include figures for chassis only, without bodies.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1941 and 1946-70 (except as noted below) are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Monthly data for total domestic sales of motor vehicles (1946-58) are available upon request. No monthly data are available for 1942-45. Factory sales for all motor vehicles for March 1954 should read 633,054 units. Revised monthly figures for 1940 are shown on p. 24 of the June 1947 SURVEY. Statistics prior to 1940 (in 1947 and earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS) are on a different basis of classification.

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Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. For a general explanation of foreign trade data, see note 1 for p. 109. Beginning 1965, exports cover non military new passenger cars (including station wagons); trucks, truck chassis, and truck tractors; motor buses; and special-purpose vehicles (gasoline or diesel). The data refer only to assembled vehicles (including cars and trucks originally assembled, but disassembled solely for shipping purposes) and to chassis with engines mounted (for example, a complete truck less body). Not covered are used or unassembled vehicles, military vehicles, cranes mounted on truck chassis, fire engines, automobile bodies, and off-highway trucks and trailers (see next paragraph). Prior to 1965 exports are tabulated according to classifications then in effect and unassembled vehicles are included in the pre-1965 figures shown. The increase in exports to Canada, beginning 1965-66, reflects the effects of the Automotive Products Trade Act of 1965 which permits duty-free entry into Canada of specified U.S. vehicles. Revised classification beginning January 1969 eliminates vehicles which operate in whole or in part on runners or skis (exports of any such vehicles in the period 1965-68 would be included).

Beginning with data for 1966, exports of two additional types, off-highway trucks and trucks with derrick assembly, winches, etc., for drilling, are included.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1963-70 (exports to Canada for 1965-70) are in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Note the additional coverage of exports of off-highway trucks, etc., is not reflected in monthly data prior to 1971 in the aforementioned volumes. Monthly data for 1964 and prior years for total exports of new and used vehicles are in the 1965 and earlier volumes. Revisions prior to 1949 are in the note in the 1963 edition of BUSINESS STATISTICS.

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Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. For a general explanation of foreign trade data, see note 1 for p. 109. Comparability of the data for the period shown is affected by the various classification schedules in effect. Beginning 1963 data are in accordance with the Tariff Schedules of the United States Annotated; for the period 1963-April 1966, the data include units not specifically identified. Comparability is also affected by the Automotive Products Trade Act of 1965. Under this Act, specified Canadian vehicles are permitted duty-free entry into the United States. The total from Canada as shown includes small quantities of duty-paid cars not covered by APTA.

Passenger cars. Beginning May 1966, imports of cars represent complete units of new, four-wheeled, on-highway passenger automobiles. See also note 8 for this page.

Trucks and buses. Note that in the 1973 edition of BUSINESS STATISTICS, imports of trucks and buses were changed (from totals

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