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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Figures represent the year's total crop; 1974 estimates are preliminary. Crop estimates for 1929-46 are shown in the 1969 and 1959 editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS,

points, quantities in transit, and amounts contracted for but not delivered.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1941-70 (except as noted below) appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Revised monthly data, available upon request, are as follows: Production of dry whole milk (1952-55 and 1962); production of nonfat dry milk (1954-56 and 1962); and stocks of nonfat dry milk (1954).

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Stocks are originally reported as of the 1st of each quarter, but are shown here as of the end of the preceding quarter. June figures for barley, oats, rye, and wheat and September figures for corn represent previous year's crop; new grain is not reported in the stock figures until the beginning of the crop year. Data for off-farm stocks represent stocks at interior mills, elevators and warehouses, commercial stocks at terminals, and (beginning December 1949 for barley; December 1939 for corn; December 1950 for oats; June 1953 for rye; and June 1942 for wheat) those owned by Commodity Credit Corporation which are in bins and other storages under C.C.C. control.

End of quarter data for 1969-70 appear in the 1973 BUSINESS STATISTICS; those for quarters prior to 1969, shown in earlier editions, have been revised and are available upon request. 6

See note 3 for this page for source; also for conversion factors used to obtain the grain equivalent of malt.

Shipments under the Army Civilian Supply Program are included in the export figures.

Comparatively small amounts of pearl barley, reported as a separate item in the export schedule beginning with 1949, are excluded from the figures for barley shown here.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1945-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). 7

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. Data are compiled from quotations given in daily trade papers, and represent the average price per bushel of reported cash sales weighted by the number of carlots sold.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1936-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

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Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data for exports of nonfat dry milk represent only exports of dry skim milk for human consumption. Shipments under the Army Civilian Supply Program are included. For a general explanation of foreign trade data, as well as information on sampling procedures effective with data for July 1953 and thereafter, see note 1 for p. 109.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1929-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Data shown in the 1942 and earlier SUPPLEMENTS are combined totals of dry whole milk and dry skim milk; separate monthly figures for 1932-40 are available upon request. 2

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Prices for nonfat dry milk are based on reports of manufacturers covering actual sales to jobbers, wholesalers, grocers, and similar buyers, f.o.b. factory, on the basis of cash or short-term credit. The figures shown here are based on prices of nonfat dry milk made by both the spray and roller processes; separate data are shown in reports of the Department of Agriculture. Data beginning 1954 exclude the price for spray-dried nonfat milk sold in retail packages.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1939-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. I of this section). 3

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data include exports of barley, corn, oats, rye, and wheat, plus the grain equivalent of malt, cornmeal and corn flour, oatmeal, and wheat flour as converted from the original data by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. The conversion factors used to obtain the grain equivalent are as follows: Malt-1 bushel of malt per bushel of barley; cornmeal (and corn flour)-6.194 bushels of corn to a barrel of cornmeal (or 3.16 bushels per cwt.); oatmeal – 7.6 bushels of oats to 100 pounds of oatmeal; wheat flour-July 1949-June 1957, 2.33 bushels of wheat per 100 pounds of flour; July 1957-December 1963, 2.3 bushels; and beginning January 1964, 2.33 bushels of wheat per 100 pounds of flour; from January 1947 through June 1949 the wheat factor varies from month to month (ranging from 2.172 to 2.33 bushels per 100 pounds), being weighed average based on the proportion of higher extraction flour sent to certain destinations. For periods when barley flour and rye were exported, these are also included, converted to grain equivalent of 5.5 bushels to the barrel for barley and 6 bushels to the barrel for rye flour. The conversion factors are those used by U.S. Department of Agriculture and take into account changes in milling practices.

The weight per bushel for the various grains included is as follows (pounds): Barley, 48; corn (shelled) and rye, 56; oats, 32; and wheat, 60.

Shipments under the Army Civilian Supply Program are included. For a general explanation of foreign trade data, as well as information on sampling procedures effective with data for July 1953 and thereafter, see note 1 for p. 109.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1945-70 (except as noted below) appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Monthly data for total grain exported for 1946 have been revised or corrected, and should read as follows (thousands of bushels): July, 28,309; September, 23,470; December, 34,527. Minor revisions in a few monthly figures for 1947-48 are available upon request.

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Annual total reflects revisions not distributed to the months.

PAGE 135 See note 3 for p. 134 for source; also for conversion factors used to obtain the grain equivalent of corn meal (including flour), and to convert oatmeal to grain equivalent.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1945-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Revision for corn, December 1946, 1,744,000 bushels. Revised monthly data prior to 1945 for oats are available upon request. Revisions resulted from a slight change in the conversion factor for oatmeal.

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. Data represent average price for bushel of reported cash sales weighted by the number of carlots sold.

Through April 1971, the weighted average price for all grades of corn covers sales at Chicago, St. Louis, Omaha, Kansas City, and Minneapolis markets. Beginning May 1971, St. Louis is no longer included. Comparability of the data is not affected by the change in number of markets.

Effective with this edition, annual and monthly data for oats beginning with 1971 are for No. 2 white, Minneapolis and are not comparable with those for previous periods. In the 1965-73 editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS, prices are for No. 2 white, Chicago. The 1963 and earlier editions reflect prices for No. 3 white, Chicago which are not comparable with subsequent editions.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1938-70 for corn appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Comparable monthly data prior to 1971 for oats, No. 2 white, Minneapolis are available from the source.

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. Data represent average prices per bushel of reported cash sales, weighted by the number of carlots sold.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1929-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service. Data cover the movement of domestic rice at all mills in California. Brewers' rice is not included. The stock figures relate to mill stocks only; they include both milled rice and rough rice in terms of cleaned (converted on the basis of 162 pounds of rough to 105.3 pounds of clean).

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for all series for 1947-70, receipts and shipments for October 1933-46, and stocks for 1934-38 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Revised monthly data for stocks for October-December 1933 and for 1939-46 are available upon request. Data in the 1942 SUPPLEMENT and earlier editions are expressed in bags of 100 pounds instead of millions of pounds.

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service. Data represent the disappearance of domestic wheat as used for flour (including that used for breakfast food), feed, seed, alcohol production, military procurement, and for export or shipment to outlying areas.

End-of-quarter data for 1969-70 appear in the 1973 BUSINESS STATISTICS; those for quarters prior to 1969, shown in earlier editions, have been revised and are available upon request.

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Source: Rice Millers Association, for data beginning August 1952; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service prior thereto. Data cover the movement of domestic rice at all mills in Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas and Tennessee; they are projected estimates from a compilation of reports from member mills of the Association and one nonmember mill. Brewers' rice is excluded from all figures. Shipments through May 1965 represent distribution “to the trade"; beginning June 1965 they also include distribution to Government agencies (shipments "to other mills” are not included). The stock figures include both milled rice and rough rice in terms of cleaned (converted on the basis of 162 pounds of rough rice to 105.3 pounds of milled); they cover rice in store mills only.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1947-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Monthly data for 1939-46 are available upon request.

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. See note 3 for p. 134 regarding conversion factors. Army Civilian Supply Program shipments are included.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1939-70 (except for revisions given below) for exports of wheat (total, including flour), for wheat only, and for wheat flour appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Revised data are as follows (thousands of bushels): Total, including four-1944 (July-December)-4,225; 4,078; 2,415; 3,212; 4,183; 2,989; 1946-July, 24,755; 1947- August, 55,455; September, 45,810; November, 36,238; December, 37,519; 1948-April, 34,857; September, 48,958; October, 46,565; November, 30,988; December, 39,192; wheat only-1946, July, 17,090; 1947, September, 29,824. Data for wheat flour are shown in the 1942 and earlier SUPPLEMENTS in barrels and should be converted to sacks for comparison with data shown in the later issues by multiplying by 1.96.

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Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data cover paddy or rough rice, and milled rice; wild rice is not included. Figures are on a clean equivalent basis, with rough rice reduced on the basis of 162 pounds of rough rice to 105.3 pounds of clean. In BUSINESS STATISTICS prior to the 1951 issue, rough rice is converted to clean on the basis of 162 pounds of rough rice to 100 pounds of clean. Shipments under the Army Civilian Supply Program are included. For a general explanation of foreign trade data, as well as information on sampling procedures effective with data for July 1953 and thereafter, see note 1 for p. 109.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1947-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Data in the 1942 and earlier volumes are expressed in pockets of 100 pounds. Revised data for 1933-46 are available upon request.

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. Data are average prices per bushel of reported cash sales, weighted by the number of carlots sold. The weighted average price of wheat currently reflects prices at the Chicago, Minneapolis, Kansas City, and Omaha markets; it is based on the reported cash sales of all classes and grades combined. For data covering 1971-72, the average price reflects a varying number of markets (ranging from four to six) but comparability of data is not affected by the change in number of markets.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1929-70 (1932-70 for No. 1 dark northern spring) appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

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Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Beginning May 1972, data are Southwest Louisiana prices, No. 2, medium grain, miller to first distributor, 100 pound bags. Data prior to May 1972 are New Orleans prices for the following specifications: Beginning July 1961, for Nato No. 2, medium grain, miller to first distributor, 100-pound bags; 1947-June 1961, for Zenith (extra fancy, 1947-July 1951; No. 2, August 1951-June 1961), miller to first distributor, 100-pound bags. Changes in specifications do not affect comparability of the data.

Through 1951 the annual averages are based on weekly quotations for Tuesday and the monthly data are average of prices for the 4 or 5

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data through 1938 (shown in BUSINESS STATISTICS prior to the 1961 edition) represent wheat-flour production and the actual grindings of wheat as reported by approximately 1,100 commercial mills, including those with a daily 24-hour capacity of 400 sacks or less (the reporting mills accounted for about 95 percent of total wheat-flour production in 1929-38). Data beginning 1939 (shown in the 1969 edition of BUSINESS STATISTICS) represent complete coverage and, through 1946, are revised estimates based on the assumption that small mills not covered by the monthly survey operated at a lower rate of capacity than reporting mills. The 1947-50 figures are as reported by all commercial mills, whereas figures beginning with 1951 are estimated totals based on reports from commercial mills with a 24-hour capacity of 400 sacks and over. The reported data from these larger mills (approximately 250 in 1973) account for about 98 percent of the

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estimated totals. Estimates for smaller mills are included on the basis of their proportion of production reported in the census of manufacturers.

All data relate to regular-grind flour only. In addition, from 1943 through February 1946, some mills produced granular flour, which was flour coarsely ground for the production of alcohol to be used in the manufacture of synthetic rubber. For 1943-46 data for granular flour, see note 3 for p. 137 of the 1961 BUSINESS STATISTICS volume.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1947-70 and for 1929-38 (with exceptions noted below) appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Revised monthly data for 1945-46 are available upon request; no comparable estimates by months for 1939-44 have been compiled. (Offal production for November 1933 should read 653,276,000 pounds.) Data for wheat flour are shown in the 1942 and earlier SUPPLEMENTS in barrels and should be multiplied by 1.96 for comparison with figures given here; offal is shown in pounds and should be converted to tons of 2,000 pounds.

the average price of all weights of such cattle, weighted by the number shipped for each weight group. The annual average for this series is the average of the monthly figures weighted by the quantity of all grades (or weights) shipped within each month.

For stocker and feeder cattle, annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1938-70 (except as noted below) appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section); the July 1944 stocker and feeder price has been revised to $11.14.

For beef steers, Omaha, monthly data for 1963-70 are available from the Bureau of Economic Analysis upon request. Annual and monthly data prior to 1963 are available from the source. 8

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Beginning January 1959, data cover prices at National Stockyards, Illinois (not comparable with earlier periods which reflect quotations at Chicago).

Through January 1972, prices are for all weights which represent quotation averages for 1 day each month (Monday in the week containing the 15th).

Effective February 1972, prices are for 100-250 lbs. and represent weekly average price.

Monthly data for 1959-70 (covering prices at National Stockyards, Illinois) appear in the 1963 and subsequent editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS; those for periods prior to 1959 (Chicago prices) are shown in the 1961 and earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

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Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data are based on reports from merchant mills reporting wheat-flour production and represent complete coverage (see note 2 for this page). Data cover total stocks held by reporting mills at the end of each quarter.

Annual data prior to 1947 and quarterly data for 1947-70 and for 1929-44 (with exceptions noted below) appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Revised data for 1945-46 (1st-4th quarters respectively) are as follows (thousands of sacks): 1945–6,730; 6,114; 5,251; 6,775; 1946-4,773; 1,813; 4,412; 6,436. Data are shown in the 1942 and earlier SUPPLEMENTS in barrels and should be converted to sacks (by multiplying by 1.96) for comparison with data shown in the later issues.

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1° Prices beginning January 1959 are not comparable with earlier prices, since they are quoted per 100 pounds in bulk instead of per 100-pound sacks as formerly. The bulk quotations for January 1959 were lower than those for 100-pound sacks by $0.28 for spring wheat flour (Minneapolis) and $0.25 for winter (Kansas City).

11 Data beginning 1959 (not comparable with earlier data) cover prices at National Stockyards, Illinois, for choice grades.

12 Prices beginning January 1960 are not comparable with earlier prices, because of change in specification (from short patents to standard patent for the Minneapolis price and from short patents to 95 percent patent for the Kansas City price). January 1960 figures were lowered by $0.272 for spring wheat flour (Minneapolis) and $0.295 for winter (Kansas City) as a result of this change.

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Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Prices are for carlots, miller to distributor, baker, or chain store bakery (prior to 1960 to wholesaler, baker, or chain store). Through 1958 the quotations are per sack of 100 pounds; subsequently, per 100 pounds of flour in bulk (see note 10 for this page). Beginning January 1960, Minneapolis prices cover standard patent and Kansas City prices cover 95 percent patent, instead of short patents as formerly (see note 12 for this page).

Through 1951 the monthly quotations are averages of the four or five weekly prices (Tuesday price for Minneapolis and Saturday for Kansas City) for each month; the annual data are averages of the weekly quotations rather than averages of the monthly figures. Beginning 1952 the data are quotation averages for 1 day each month (in the week containing the 15th).

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1949-70 are published in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section); monthly data prior to 1949 are available upon request.

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Data are based on calendar months and represent the number of animals slaughtered under Federal inspection.

In 1974 slaughter under Federal inspection accounted for approximately 79 percent of all calves slaughtered, 91 percent of the cattle, 97 percent of the sheep and lambs, and 94 percent of the hogs. While the proportions of total slaughter vary from year to year, the differences are generally not large.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1929-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Data were shown in the 1942 and earlier SUPPLEMENTS under the “leather and leather products" section as an indication of the output of hides and skins.

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. The wholesale price represents the average price of packer and shipper purchases of barrows and gilts at Sioux City weighted by the number of hogs purchased.

The hog-corn price ratio represents the number of bushels (56 pounds) of shelled corn equal in value to 100 pounds of hog (live weight); it is based on average prices received by farmers on the 15th of each month for all grades of corn and all grades of hogs.

Beginning 1970, the annual averages for the hog-corn price ratio are for a market year (December-November) instead of a calendar year as formerly.

Annual data prior to 1947 for the hog-corn price ratio and monthly data for 1967-70 for the price of hogs and for 1941-58 and 1965-70 for the hog-corn ratio appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Monthly data for 1959-64 for the hog-corn ratio have been revised; the revisions are available upon request.

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Monthly data are averages of weekly figures, which are based on the mean of the daily range of quotations. July-September prices are quotations for spring lambs; those for May and June are for wooled and shorn lambs from the preceding year's crop and spring lambs from the current year's crop. From October through early spring, prices are for wooled lambs.

The average price of lambs at Omaha is based on the bulk of sales prices from data of the livestock and meat reporting service.

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Monthly data for 1967-70 appear in the 1971 and 1973 BUSINESS STATISTICS; those for 1957-66 are available upon request.

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Effective January 1972, data are for East coast (New York and Philadelphia average); prior thereto they are for New York. Comparability of the data is not affected.

Beginning with 1951, data represent the wholesale price for beef, fresh, steer carcasses, choice (600-700 pounds); prior thereto, the quotations are for good instead of choice grade (1951 average price for good grade, $0.556). Monthly data are averages of weekly prices, which are based on the mean of the daily range of quotations of the market news service; annual figures are simple averages of monthly data.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1945-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section); monthly data prior to 1945 are available upon request.

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Data for meat production (except for pork; see next paragraph) represent the total dressed carcass weight of livestock slaughtered under Federal inspection, exclusive of meats from condemned animals. Edible offal is not included. (Note that “total meat” production includes leaf lard; in BUSINESS STATISTICS prior to the 1961 edition, the data were erroneously labeled as excluding leaf lard.) Total production is obtained by multiplying the average dressed weight (obtained from concerns accounting for the major portion of the total federally inspected slaughter) by the total federally inspected slaughter. In 1974, production of federally inspected meats, excluding lard, accounted for 91 percent of the total production (commercial and farm) of meats, excluding lard. For the proportion of animals slaughtered under Federal inspection to the total slaughter, see note 6 for p. 137.

“Pork production excluding lard” comprises all of the dressed hog carcass, but excludes head bones and all carcass fat rendered into lard.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1929-70 (except for 1937 for “pork production, excluding lard”) appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Monthly data for 1921-57 for all series are available in the U.S. Department of Agriculture bulletin (No. 230) entitled Livestock and Meat Statistics, 1957. 5

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Data cover stocks held in public, private, and semiprivate warehouses, and meatpacking plants where food products are generally stored for 30 days or more. They include stocks owned by the Armed Services and stored in warehouses not owned or leased by them; stocks held in space owned or leased and operated by the Armed Services are not included. Through 1949, stocks were reported as of the first of each month; they are included here as data for the end of the preceding month.

"Total meat stocks” comprise the following items: Beef and veal, lamb and mutton, and pork (see data separately shown); canned meats and canned meat products; edible offal, and sausage and sausage-room products (through December 1956 only). At the end of December 1956, stocks of edible offal totaled 59 million pounds; sausage and sausage-room products, 14 million pounds.

The content of various other items is as follows: "Beef and veal” – beef frozen, in cure, cured and smoked, and frozen veal; “lamb and mutton"-frozen; “Pork”-frozen, dry salt and other, in cure and cured.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1951-70 for “total meats, excluding lard" and for 1929-70 for the other series on stocks of meats appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). The comparable item for pork is designated in the 1940 and earlier SUPPLEMENTS as “fresh and cured” pork; the series for total stocks of pork (including lard) shown in those SUPPLEMENTS has been discontinued.

Monthly data prior to 1951 for total meat stocks, excluding lard, are available upon request (the data shown in the 1953 and earlier issues of BUSINESS STATISTICS included stocks of lard). 6

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. For a general explanation of foreign trade data, as well as information on sampling procedures effective with data for July 1953 and thereafter, see note 1 for p. 109.

The trade figures comprise fresh meats and chilled or frozen, canned, pickled, cured, and other prepared and processed meats. Data for total meats (both exports and imports) include beef and veal, pork, mutton and lamb, canned meats, fresh poultry and game, edible offal, sausage, sausage ingredients, casings (through 1961 only), and horsemeat (in imports beginning September 1961); for exports, the data also include lard and tushonka. Imports of lard are not included; they were small in the earlier years covered.

Except as noted below, annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1938-70 for exports (total meats, 1961-70) appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Exports of beef and veal for February 1948 have been revised to 1,403,000 pounds.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1953-70 for imports appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS; monthly data for 1951-52 (except pork imports) are in the 1955 edition. Monthly data prior to 1953 for pork imports and prior to 1951 for other import series are available upon request.

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Specifications for ham prices are as follows: Beginning with data for June 1974-weekly weighted average price per pound (East coast and Los Angeles), smoked, skinned, fully cooked; 14-17 lb., carlots (prior periods represent 1.c.1.); from February 1972 through May 1974-weekly weighted average price (East coast and Los Angeles), smoked, skinned, 10-14 pounds, fully cooked; from March 1970 through January 1972-weighted average market price (New York and Los Angeles), smoked, No. 1 skinned, 10-14 pounds, fully cooked, wrapped; from February 1962 through February 1970-weighted average market price (Chicago and New York), smoked, No. 1 skinned, 10-14 pounds, fully cooked, wrapped; from 1947 through January 1962-weighted average market price (Chicago, New York, and San Francisco), smoked, No. 1, skinned, 12-16 pounds, wrapped. Through 1951, prices are quotation averages for 1 day each week; beginning with 1952, they are quotation averages for 1 day each month (usually in the week containing the 15th).

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1932-70 (except 1947 and 1948, which are available upon request) appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Monthly data are based on the mean of the daily range of quotations. Prices are for 8 to 12 pound average loins through May 1967, and 8-14 pounds thereafter; this minor change does not affect the comparability of the series. Quotations at New York exclude locally dressed meat.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1940-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Monthly data prior to 1940 are available upon request. 6

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Data represent the total commercial production (at federally inspected and other commercial plants) of chicken and turkey meat on a ready-to-cook basis; slaughter on farms for home use and nonfarm production are excluded. The estimates are based on available indications of marketings developed from information on inventories, number raised, intentions to raise and market poultry, as well as on chicken placements and current monthly marketings.

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Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1955-70 (except as noted below) appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note p. 1 of this section); the December 1958 figure should read 528 million pounds. Monthly data for 1934-54 are available upon request.

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Data cover stocks held in public, private, and semiprivate warehouses and meatpacking plants where food products are generally stored for 30 days or more. Stocks held in space owned or leased and operated by the Armed Services are not included. Through 1949, stocks were reported as of the first of each month; they are included here as data for the end of the preceding month.

Stocks of poultry include all types and are for frozen poultry only.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1929-70 (except for stocks of turkeys prior to 1955) appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section); monthly data prior to 1955 for turkeys are available upon request.

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Data cover stocks held in public, private, and semiprivate warehouses and meatpacking plants where food products are generally stored for 30 days or more. Stocks held in space owned or leased and operated by the Armed Services are not included. Through 1949, stocks were reported as of the first of each month; they are included here as data for the end of the preceding month.

Data for shell eggs are for cases of 30 dozen each, weighing about 45 to 47 pounds. The amount of frozen eggs (white, yolks, whole, and/or mixed) obtained from a case of shell eggs has been about 39.5 pounds per case since 1957; in earlier years, the yield was somewhat lower.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1929-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section).

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Marketing Service. Data represent weekly average prices for consumer grade A large, cartoned, white, shell eggs to volume buyers, delivered to store door, Chicago metropolitan area.

The new series shown here was established in November 1968 and is not comparable with data published in the 1973 and earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS.

Monthly data for 1969 and 1970 are available upon request.

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Data are estimates of prices received for commercial broilers by producers at point of sale out of producers' hands, and represent the average for chickens and other young, meat-type birds as well (i.e., fryers, roasters, heavy pullets, capons and rock cornish). These price estimates are based on reports submitted currently by chicken producers, chicken buyers, and others well informed regarding chicken prices; in addition, market reports from terminal markets and for important producing areas are considered wherever available.

Beginning 1972, the annual averages are for a market year (December-November) instead of a calendar year as formerly.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1955-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see note, p. 1 of this section). Monthly data for 1940-54 are available upon request.

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Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data represent imports for consumption. For a general explanation of foreign trade data, as well as information on sampling procedures effective with data for July 1953 and thereafter, see note 1 for p. 109.

Data for imports of coffee represent green (or raw) coffee. The figures are shown in the original reports in pounds and are converted to bags of 132.276 pounds.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1929-70 for cocoa and 1955-70 for coffee appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Revisions for cocoa (in long tons): 1931-May, 22,513; July, 17,542; December, 15,369; and, November 1957, 11,031. Monthly data prior to 1955 for coffee may be obtained from the Bureau of Census. 5

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Data for cocoa are for beans, Accra, bulk, f.o.b. New York, spot market prices. Data for Santos No. 4 coffee are spot market prices for green coffee, bulk, ex-dock, f.o.b. New York.

For data through 1951, the annual figures are averages of the weekly quotations for Tuesdays in the year and the monthly data are averages of quotations for the 4 or 5 Tuesdays in each month. Beginning 1952, the prices are quotation averages for 1 day each month (usually in the week containing the 15th).

Annual data prior to 1947 for both series and monthly data for 1929-70 for cocoa and 1939-70 for coffee appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). Monthly data prior to 1938 for coffee are shown on p. 22 of the April 1942 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS.

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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Statistical Reporting Service. Data represent eggs produced by farm flocks and by commercial flocks. Monthly estimates of total eggs produced are based on returns from egg producers who report for the first day of each month the number of layers on hand and the number of eggs produced. The total monthly egg production is obtained by multiplying the estimated total number of layers by the number of eggs produced per layer.

Annual estimates of layers on December 1 of each year are based on a survey covering all large producers and a sample of smaller producers. At the end of the year adjustments are made in the number of layers on the first of each month, where necessary, so that they will agree with the annual estimates. The monthly rates of lay are then applied to the adjusted number of layers to secure the adjusted total egg production for each month. Data for all years have been so adjusted. The estimates are also adjusted every 5 years to data reported in the census of agriculture; they have now been adjusted to data from the 1969 Census.

Beginning 1972, the annual totals are for a market year (December-November) instead of a calendar year as formerly.

Annual data prior to 1947 and monthly data for 1963-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS (see reference note, p. 1 of this section). There have been minor revisions in all the monthly data prior to 1963; these revisions are available upon request.

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data for green coffee inventories and roastings represent industry totals. Prior to 1955, data were based on a complete canvass of all known roasters, importers, and other holders of green coffee; since 1955, these data are based on a probability sample of firms. The industry totals based on this sample may not agree exactly with the results of a complete census; however, for the sample in use through 1964, the chances are two out of three that the estimates for inventories would differ from results of a complete enumeration by less than 2 percent; roastings could differ by about 3 percent. Beginning the 1st quarter 1965, the sample was revised on the basis of information from the 1963 Census of Manufactures; the new estimates are subject to a sampling error of less than one percent.

Green coffee inventories are limited to stocks which have cleared customs and are in the United States. However, they include any goods in the United States on consignment from foreign sources. Roastings for sale to the military services, included since 1957, represent about 2 percent of the total amount roasted. The inventory figures prior to 1957 exclude stocks held by the military services (effective July 1956, the military services discontinued handling green coffee).

Quarterly data for 1955-70 appear in earlier editions of BUSINESS STATISTICS. Quarterly data for 1949-51 and for 1954 (roastings only) are available upon request.

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