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Gatamount Tavern at Bennington
Ruins of Fort Ticonderoga
An old gun of Ethan Allen's
Old Constitution House at Windsor
John Stark
Colonel Baum's sword
Two of the cannon captured at Bennington
Catamount Monument
Bennington Battle Monument
Thomas Chittenden
State seal
Middlesex Narrows, Winooski River
Ira Allen
A post-rider
Early Vermont coins
Stocks
Pillory
Toll-gate near the Connecticut River
First State House, Montpelier
Billings Library (University of Vermont), Burlington
Some of the Middlebury College buildings
Old printing-press at the State House .
A group of Morgan horses
Falls of the Otter Creek, at Vergennes
The Connecticut River, at Bellows Falls
A Franklin stove.
Part of a marble quarry, West Rutland
Section of a granite quarry, Woodbury
View in a slate quarry in western Vermont .
Emigrant (Conestoga) wagon and carriages .
Captain Alden Partridge
Colonel Truman B. Ransom
Norwich University buildings in 1846

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Mount Mansfield, as seen from Stowe .

331 Thompson's Point, Lake Champlain

332 Notch Road, Mount Mansfield

333 Railroad bridge over Quechee Gulf, Woodstock Railroad

339 Mark Skinner Library, Manchester

343 Winooski Valley, near North Duxbury

345 Montpelier Seminary

347 Saxton's River Academy

349 Goodrich Memorial Library, Newport .

352 Norman Williams Library, Woodstock

354 Camel's Hump, as seen from Montpelier

357 Lake Dunmore

359 New iron bridge at Brattleboro

361 Lamoille River, near Milton .

363 Poster announcing town meeting .

364 Facsimile (reduced) of a ballot for a State election Facing 366 Memorial building, Stowe

367 Missisquoi River, near Swanton

371 Government building, St. Albans .

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LIST OF MAPS

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Indian tribes.
Indian villages
Forts and Indian roads .
Plan of Fort Dummer
Original plan of the town of Bennington
First political divisions of Vermont
Naval battle on Lake Champlain, 1776
Map showing the region of Burgoyne's invasion.
Map of Vermont
Geological map of Vermont .
Map showing counties, towns, and railroads

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335 Facing 342

VERMONT

FOR YOUNG VERMONTERS

INTRODUCTION

The history of Vermont naturally divides itself into nine periods :

1. The Indian.-This period extends to the opening of the French and Indian wars in 1689. In this portion of the work a brief sketch is given of the red men who once inhabited or traversed the territory now included in the State of Vermont. During this period Lake Champlain and its shores are for the first time looked upon by white men. Half a century after its discovery, the French build and garrison a fort upon one of its islands, and thus become the first white men to occupy any portion of the present State.

2. The French and Indian Wars.-- This period extends from 1689 to 1760, during which time the French and English are at war. The Wilderness, as Vermont is now called, is used as a thoronghfare by both parties and their Indian allies, and sometimes also as a battle-ground. Both nations grant townships in the Wilderness and make feeble attempts at settlement, building forts or block-houses for their protection.

3. Early Settlement. The early settlement period extends from the close of the French and Indian wars in 1760 to the breaking out of the Revolutionary War in 1775. During this time many townships are granted by the Governor of New Hampshire, under the name of the New Hampshire Grants, and settlements are made. This gives rise to a controversy over the ownership of the lands, which lasts many years, and finally results in making the grants an independent State. This portion of the work gives an account of this controversy, and relates some of the novel methods employed by the New Hampshire grantees in defense of their rights, giving also something of a history of the life of the pioneer and his family.

4. The Revolutionary War.–Although extending over a space of about eight years only, this period (1775–1783) is rich in events. During the entire time the grants are involved in a twofold struggle : they are at war with England and at war with their neighbors. They also declare themselves independent, organize a government of their own, and become practically a republic, at the same time appealing to Congress to recognize them as an independent State, and grant them admission into the Union.

5. Rapid Settlement. This period extends from the close of the Revolutionary War in 1783 to the breaking out of the War of 1812. Settlements spring up and grow rapidly, and a majority of the counties are formed. Vermont stoutly maintains her independence, and is finally admitted into the Union with the full consent of all concerned. Then follows a period of great growth and prosperity, and the settlers in the new State are happy and contented.

6. War of 1812.-. This is a period of about two years, during which time the United States is at war with Great Britain, Vermont doing her full share in defending the frontier.

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