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Districts.

President Judges. 4. Huntingdon, Mifflin, Centre, and Clearfield, Thomas Burnside. 5. Beaver, Butler, and Alleghany,

Charles Shaler. 6. Erie, Crawford, Mercer, Venango, and Warren, Henry Shippin. 7. Bucks and Montgomery,

John Fox. 8. Northum’d, Lycoming, Union, and Columbia, Seth Chapman. 9. Cumberland, Adams, and Perry,

John Reed. 10. Westmore’d, Indiana, Armstrong, and Cambria, John Young. 11. Luzerne, Wayne, and Pike,

David Scott. 12. Dauphin, Lebanon, and Schuylkill,

Calvin Blythe. 13. Susquehanna, Bradford, Tioga, and McKean, Edward Herrick. 14. Washington, Fayette, and Greene,

Thomas H. Baird. 15. Chester and Delaware,

Isaac Darlington. 16. Franklin, Bedford, and Somerset,

Allen Thompson. The state is divided into five districts for the sessions of the Supreme Court, which, as a court in bank, holds six regular terms, for argument &c., annually ; viz. for the Eastern District, at Philadelphia, on the 2d Monday in March, and on the 2d Monday in December; for the Lancaster District, at Lancaster, on the 2d Monday in May; for the Middle District, at Sunbury, on the Wednesday following the second week of the term of the Lancaster District; for the Western District, at Pittsburg, on the first Monday in September; and for the Southern District, at Chambersburg, on the Monday week next following the second week of the term of the Western District.

It is only in the city and county of Philadelphia that the Supreme Court has original jurisdiction, and there only when the sum in controversy exceeds $500; all issues of fact are tried by jury before a single judge, at nisi prius.

For the other counties of this state, Circuit Courts are held, which are unlike courts of nisi prius, as judgment may be rendered at them, subject to revision by appeal, in the Supreme Court in bank, and causes are only brought into them by removal from the Courts of Common Pleas. They are held by one judge in each county, at least once a year.

SCHUYLKILL NAVIGATION FOR 1829.
Ascending.

Descending
Merchandise, 5,068 Bricks, 709|Coal, 79,973 Butter, 119
Salt, 2,288 Porter, 10 Flour, 5,023 Wood, 957
Fish, 2,239 Wood, 456 Whiskey, 868 Limestone, 8,968
Plaster, 3,320 Limestone, 3,931 Grain, 3,139 Marble, 356
Grain, 230 Marble, 2 Lumber, 5,091 Iron Ore, 556
Lumber, 740 Iron Ore, 1,763 Iron,

958 Sundries,

490 Iron,

227 Sundries, 624 Blooms of Iron1,184 Stone passPig Iron, 146

Castings, 240 ing Fair M. 3,615
Castings, 16 Tons 21,800 Nails, 1,098
Whiskey,
31

Leather, 69 Tons 112,704

BANKS,

From a Statement reported to the Legislature, January 6, 1830.

Banks.

Capital.

Notes in circu

lation.

Specie.

Dividends per year.

North America,

1,000,000 00 234,023 43 130,924 50 5 Philadelphia,

1,800,000 00 381,994 00 228,650 001 5 Farmers and Mechanics',

1,250,000 00 329,960 00 164,129 00 Commercial,

1,000,000 00 216,904 00 109,984 88 6 Mechanics',

529,330 00 241,493 00 163,923 171 9 Schuylkill,

500,000 00 336,413 00 95,359 21) 7 Northern Liberties,

200,000 00 321,431 00 103,802 19 Southwark,

249,630 00 181,590 00 90,229 9310 Kensington,

124,990 00 116,775 00 48,605 41 Penn Township,

149,980 00 176,470 00

48,632 26 81 City Banks.

6,803,930 00 2,537,053 43 1,184,240 55 Germantown,

129,500 00 59,355 00

20,707 7661 Harrisburg,

158,525 00 406,384 31 104,453 69 8 Pittsburg,

346,155 50 308,263 00 49,562 11 8 Farmers' Bank, Lancaster, 400,000 00 179,331 00 40,635 58 Lancaster,

131,235 00 147,460 00 24,658 44 Columbia Bridge,

395,000 00 164,094 30

41,814 41| 54 Farmers' Bank, Reading, 300,350 00 191,177 00 41,923 736 Chester County,

90,000 00

209,064 00 61,462 3310 Delaware County,

77,510 00 123,451 00 39,405 57 8 Montgomery County,

133,340 00 145,565 00 48,509 57 58 Easton Bank,

187,380 00 382,009 40 42,448 90/10 Northampton,

112,500 00 314,256 00 35,136 46 7 York,

168,720 00 99,185 00

82,448 39 73 Carlisle,

171,466 00 114,385 00

23,395 107 Chambersburg,

247,228 34 184,613 25 21,570 00 5 Gettysburg,

125,318 00 78,150 00 21,748 511 6 Mong. Bank of Brownsville, 102,123 00 171,744 00

18,635 447 Westmoreland, 107,033 00 83,574 00

660 416 Farmers' Bank of Bucks,

60,000 00 74,534 00 8,413 17 3 Miners' of Pottsville,

40,000 00 190,000 00 37,554 00 3 Erie,

20,020 00 33,055 00 9,393 18 21 Country Banks,

3,506,403 84 3,659,650 26 775,536 75 10 City

6,803,930 00 2,537,053 43 1,184,240 55 Grand Totals, (10,310,333 84 16,196,703 69 1,959,777 30

do.

EDUCATION

The principal literary seminaries in this state are the University of Pennsylvania with its Medical School, at Philadelphia ; Dickinson College, at Carlisle; Jefferson College, at Canonsburg ; Washington College, at Washington; Western University, at Pittsburg; Alleghany College, at Mead

ville; Madison College, at Union Town; Mount Airy College, at Germantown; the Theological Seminaries, at Gettysburg, York, and Alleghany Town; and the Moravian schools, at Bethlehem, Nazareth, and Litiz.

The Constitution declares that “ the legislature shall, as soon as conveniently may be, provide by law for the establishment of schools in such manner that the poor may be taught gratis.” Under this injunction means have been provided in nearly all the counties of the state, for the instruction of the children of indigent parents. They are sent to the most convenient schools of the neighborhoods in which they respectively reside, and the expense is paid by the county commissioners. In the city and county of Philadelphia, which constitutes the First School District of Pennsylvania, the Lancasterian system has been introdueed for the education of the children described in the Constitution. In the Twelfth Annual Report of the Comptrollers of the Publie Schools of this District, dated February 23, 1830, it is stated, that “ during twelve years 34,703 children had received the benefits of tuition under the wise and beneficent provisions of the existing act of the General Assembly.” These schools are superintended by gentlemen who serve without compensation. The teachers are well qualified for their duties, and are liberally paid. [See Hazard's " Register of Pennsylvania."]

X. DELAWARE.

THE first European settlement in this state was formed by Swedes and Finns, in 1627; in 1655, the colony was taken from the Swedes by the Dutch, under Governor Stuyvesant; and after the conquest of New York by the English, in 1664, it was placed under the jurisdiction of the government of New York.

In 1682, the country was granted to William Penn, and it was placed under the same executive and legislative government with Pennsylvania. It was then, as it is now, divided into three counties, Newcastle, Kent, and Sussex, generally styled, till the American Revolution, “ The Three Lower Counties upon the Delaware."

In 1701, the representatives of Delaware withdrew from those of Pennsylvania; the first separate legislative assembly met at Newcastle, in 1704; and it ever afterwards continued distinct from that of Pennsylvania ; though the same governor presided over both provinces till the 4th of July, 1776.

The first Constitution of Delaware, which was formed in 1776, placed the executive power in a President, and a Privy Council of 4 members. In 1792, a new Constitution, the one now in operation, was adopted, by which the executive power is vested in a Governor.

Presidents under the First Constitution.

John McKinley, elected
Cæsar Rodney,

do. John Dickinson, do. John Cook, (Acting Pres.)

1777 | Nicholas Van Dyke, elected
1778. Thomas Collins, do.
1782 John Davis, (Acting Pres.)
1783 Joshua Clayton, elected

1783 1786 1789 1789

Governors elected under the Present, Constitution.
Joshua Clayton,
Gov. 1793 | Daniel Rodney,

Gov. 1814 Gunning Bedford, do. 1796 John Clarke,

do. 1817 Daniel Rogers, (Acting Gov.) 1797 Jacob Stout, (Acting Gov.) 1820 Richard Bassett, Gov. 1798 John Collins,

Gov. 1821 James Sykes, (Acting Gov.) 1801 | Caleb Rodney, (Acting Goo.) 1822 David Hall,

Goo. 1802 Joseph Haslett, Gov. 1823 Nathaniel Mitchell, do. 1805 | Samuel Paynter,

do. 1824 do. George Truett, 1808 Charles Polk,

do. 1827 Joseph Haslett, do. 1811 David Hazzard, do. 1830

OUTLINES OF THE CONSTITUTION.

The legislative power is vested in a General Assembly, consisting of a Senate and House of Representatives.

The representatives are elected annually, 7 from each county, the whole number being 21. Th3 senators are elected for three years, 3 from each county, the whole number being 9. Three senators, one from each county, are chosen every year.

The executive power is vested in a Governor, who is elected by the people for three years; and he cannot hold the office more than 3 years in 6.

The representatives and three of the senators are elected annually on the first Tuesday in October; and the governor, every third year, at the same time.

The General Assembly meets (at Dover), annually, on the first Tuesday in January

The Constitution grants the right of suffrage to all white freemen, of the age of 21 years, who have resided in the state two years, next before the election, and within that tiine paid a state or county tax.

The judicial power is vested in a Court of Chancery, a Supreme Court, Court of Common Pleas, &c. The chancellor and judges are appointed by the governor, and hold their offices during good behavior.

LEGISLATURE.

David Hazzard, Governor; term of office expires on the 3d Tuesday in , January, 1833 ; salary $1,333.33.

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Senators.
John Caulk,

Newcastle
Presley Spruance, jr.

Kent William Seal,

Elias Naudain,
County.
William Johnson,

County.
Purnel Tindal,
Joseph Maull, Sussex County.

George Truett, The pay of the members of the Senate and House of Representatives is $2,50 for each day's attendance.

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Farmers' Bank of the State of Delaware, at Dover, with brancnes Capital. at Newcastle, Wilmington, and Georgetown,

$ 500,000 Bank of Wilmington and Brandywine,

250,000 Bank of Delaware, at Wilmington,

200,000 Bank of Smyrna, with a branch at Milford,

100,000 EDUCATION. This state has a School Fund, amounting to $170,000, the interest of which, together with a small tax levied on each school district of four miles square, at the will of the majority of the taxable inhabitants, is appropriated to the support of free schools. No district is entitled to any share of the School Fund, that will not raise, by taxation, a sum equal to its share of the income of the Fund.

XI. MARYLAND. IN 1632, Maryland was granted by Charles I. of England, to Sir George Calvert, Lord Baltimore, a Roman Catholic, and an eminent statesman,

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