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ought to wear with pleasure to himself, and honour to the fraternity.

This section closes with an explanation of the working tools, which are, the twenty-four inch guage, and the common gavel.

The twenty-four inch guage is an instrument used by operative masons to measure and lay out their work; but we, as free and accepted Masons, are taught to make use of it for the more noble and glorious purpose of dividing our time. It being divided into twenty-four equal parts, is emblematical of the twenty-four hours of the day, which we are taught to divide into three equal parts; whereby are found eight hours for the service of God, and a distressed worthy brother; eight for our usual vocations; and eight for refreshment and sleep.

The common gavel is an instrument made use of by operative masons to break off the corners of rough stones, the better to fit them for the builder's use; but we, as free and accepted Masons, are taught to make use of it for the more noble and glorious purpose of divesting our hearts and consciences of all the vices and superfluities of life; thereby fitting our minds, as living stones, for that spiritual building, that house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.

SECTION II.

The second section rationally accounts for the ceremony of initiating a candidate into our ancient institution.

THE BADGE OF A MASON.

Every candidate, at his initiation, is presented with a lamb-skin or white* leather apron.

* Masons, as one of their first principles, profess innocence; they put on white apparel, as an emblem of that character, which bespeaks purity

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The lamb has, in all ages, been deemed an emblem of innocence; the lamb-skin is therefore to remind him of that purity of life and conduct, which is so essentially necessary to his gaining admission into the Celestial Lodge above, where the Supreme Architect of the universe presides.

SECTION III.

The third section explains the nature and principles of our Constitution. Here also we receive instructions relative to the form, supports, covering, furniture, ornaments, lights, and jewels of the lodge; how it should be situated, and to whom dedicated.

From east to west, and between north and south, Free Masonry extends; and in every clime are Masons to be found.

Our institution is said to be supported by Wisdom, Strength, and Beauty; because it is necessary that there should be wisdom to contrive, strength to support, and beauty to adorn, all great and important undertakings.

Its covering is no less than a clouded canopy, or a starrydecked Heaven, where all good Masons hope at last to arrive, by the aid of the theological ladder, which Jacob, in his vision, saw ascending from earth to heaven; the three principal rounds of which are denominated Faith, Hope, and Charity; and which admonish us to have faith in God, hope in mortality, and charity to all mankind.

of soul, guiltlessness, and being harmless. The apron with which we are clothed, indicates a disposition of innocence, and belies not the wearer's heart. Let the ignorant deride and scoff on; superior to the ridicule and malice of the wicked, we will enfold ourselves in the garb of our own virtue, and safe in self-approving conscience, stand unmoved amidst the persecutions of adversity.

To be a true Mason, is to possess this principle: or the apparel which he wears is an infamy to the apostate, and only shows him forth to shame and contempt.

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THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

ASTOR LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATION

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