Indian Affairs: Treaties

Sampul Depan
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1904 - 1708 halaman
 

Apa yang dikatakan orang - Tulis resensi

Kami tak menemukan resensi di tempat biasanya.

Istilah dan frasa umum

Bagian yang populer

Halaman 662 - The right of taking fish, at all usual and accustomed grounds and stations, is further secured to said Indians, in common with all citizens of the territory, and of erecting temporary houses for the purpose of curing, together with the privilege of hunting, gathering roots and berries, and pasturing their horses on open and unclaimed lands : Provided, however, That they shall not take shell fish from any beds staked or cultivated by citizens...
Halaman 29 - There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the whole Cherokee nation of Indians.
Halaman 100 - Cherokees acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States, and of no other power. Protection does not imply the destruction of the protected.
Halaman 649 - Superior, shall be entitled to eighty acres of land, to be selected by them under the direction of the President, and which shall be secured to them by patent in the usual form.
Halaman 660 - This treaty shall be obligatory on the contracting parties as soon as the same shall be ratified by the President and Senate of the United States.
Halaman 13 - For the benefit and comfort of the Indians, and for the prevention of injuries or oppressions on the part of the citizens or Indians, the United States in Congress assembled shall have the sole and exclusive right of regulating the trade with the Indians, and managing all their affairs in such manner as they think proper.
Halaman 6 - A line shall be drawn, beginning at the mouth of a creek about four miles east of Niagara, called Oyonwayea, or Johnston's Landing-Place, upon the lake named by the Indians Oswego, and by us Ontario; from thence southerly in a direction always four miles east of the...
Halaman 41 - Chikago, to the commencement of the portage, between that river and the Illinois, and down the Illinois river to the Mississippi, also from Fort Wayne along the portage aforesaid which leads to the Wabash, and then down the Wabash to the Ohio. And the said Indian tribes will also allow to the people of the United States the free use of the harbors and mouths of rivers along the lakes adjoining the Indian lands, for sheltering vessels and boats, and liberty to land their cargoes where necessary for...
Halaman 9 - If any citizen of the United States, or other person, not being an Indian, shall attempt to settle on any of the lands...
Halaman 168 - Given under my hand, at the city of Washington, this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, and of the independence of the United States the forty-second. By the President: JAMES MONROE. JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, Secretary of State.

Informasi bibliografi