Gambar halaman
PDF
ePub

BETWEEN

DRS. WARREN AND PUTNAM

ON THE SUBJECT OF

MEDICAL ETHICS

WITH

AN ACCOUNT OF THE MEDICAL EMPIRICISMS OF

:: EUROPE AND AMERICA

[blocks in formation]

BERMINGHAM & COMPANY
28 UNION SQUARE, EAST 20 KING WILLIAM ST., STRAND
NEW YORK

LONDON
1884

[ocr errors]

COPYRIGHT, 1884,
By FRANK H. HAMILTON.

H724 H21

1884

PREFACE.

THE “Conversations," written in moments of enforced idleness, while recovering from a serious illness, and published originally in successive numbers of the Medical Gazette, were intended to represent the conflicting opinions of medical men in this country on the subject of a written Code of Ethics, and substantially, the grounds upon which these opinions are based.

By a large proportion of the profession the question has seemed to be one of importance, not only in its relations to the interests of the public at large, but also in its relations to the morals and character of the profession, and the progress of medical science.

If, therefore, the discussions which have arisen have been characterized by earnestness, and perhaps by a certain degree of acerbity, it should be ascribed to the magnitude of the issues apparently involved and not to personal or interested motives.

The writer does not deny that he feels earnestly upon this subject, but he trusts that nothing he has written indicates acerbity or illiberality on his part. Among those who differ from him are not a few of his most intimate and beloved personal friends, and for whose opinions in most matters he entertains the highest respect. It would be painful, therefore, for him to know that he had said anything by which he should inflict a wound, or forfeit their friendship and esteem.

a

[ocr errors]

CONVERSATIONS.

FIRST CONVERSATION.

A demand for liberty-Liberty is not license-We

are bound to obey, but are not bound to respect all laws-Moonshiners.

Dr. Warren. Have you interested yourself in the struggle for liberty, which some of us are making in our effort to free ourselves from the bondage of the Code of Ethics, which has hitherto held us in a most degrading subjection?

Dr. Putnam. I have noticed the “struggle for liberty," as you are pleased to call it, but I cannot say that I sympathize with its objects. It seems to me rather a struggle for license, than a struggle for liberty.

Dr. Warren. Is it possible that you, the descendant of a family famous for its love of freedom, should hold such views; and be willing to remain in a kind of moral slavery, in which

« SebelumnyaLanjutkan »