Gambar halaman
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Page.
Deposits of banks and bankers, tax on..

.XVII, XVIII
Director of the Mint, attention of Congress called to report of..

XIX
District attorneys, allowances to. for compensation

XXXIII, XXXIV
Dollars, silver, have not been in circulation in the United States since 1857.

ΧΙ
whole amount of, issned prior to 1-53...

XXIII
if restored to our coinage, should be subject to the same rules as to issue and convert.
ibility as or her forms of money.

XXI
Dollars, trade. (See Trade-dollar.)
Doinestic products, other than bullion, exportation of, has largely increased

XII
exports, to Canada, returns of, incomplete

XXVIII
Estimated receipis for second, tbird, and fourth quarters of the fiscal year ending June 30,

1878
Estimated expenditures for the second, third, and fourth quarters of the fiscal year ending

June 30, 1878
Estimated surplus revenue for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878
Estimated dericit on account of the sinking-fund for the tiscal year ending June 30, 1878.
Estimated receipts for the fiscal year ending June 3), 1879
Estimated expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1879.
Estimated deficiency for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1879
Expenditures, ordinary, for the tiscal year ended June 30, 1877

III
total, decrease in amount of, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877, as compared with
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1876

IV
for the first quarter of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878
estimated, for the second, third, and fourth quarters of the fiscal year ending June 30,

1878...
estimated, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1879...

VI
public, reduction of, can only be accomplished by a careful revision of existing laws..

VII
Esports, domestic, coin value of, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877..

XXVII
foreign, coin value of, during the tiscal year ended June 30, 1877....

XXVII
excess of, over imports

XXVII
of specie and bullion..

XXVIII
domestic, to Canada, returns of. incomplete

XXVIII
Fees, consular, letters patent, and land, receipts from, for the fiscal year ended June 30,
1877...

III
Files, crowded condition of the, in several offices of the Treasury Department

XXXI
importance of securing the, from destruction, and providing for them such room as
will make them readily accessible, cannot be overestimated.......

XXXI
Fog-signals. (See Light-House Establishment.)
Fines, penalties, and forfeitures, customs, receipts from, for the fiscal year ended June 30,
1877

III
amount of, collected and paid into the Treasury for violation of enstoms laws.....XXVIII, XXIX
Foreign intercourse, expenses for, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1977

III
Frands on the revenne by undervalnation

XXVII
efforts to prevent, have not been attended with entire success

XXVII
change from ad valorem to specific duties suggested as a remedy for.

XXVII
Fractional currency, estimated amount of, lost and destroyed

XIX
exchange and substitution of silver coin for, required by act of January 14, 1875

XIX
aggregate of, and silver coin outstanding limited by joint resolution of July 22, 1876... XIX
Funding operations:

amount of 44 per cent bonds sold nnder contract of Angust 24, 1876, to March 1, 1877.. VIIT
sale of 4) per cent. bonds limited by notice in May, 1877

VIII
terms of contract for the sale of 4 per cent. bonds, made June 9, 1877.

VIII, IX
amount of bonds sold under contract of June 9, 1877..

IX
how proceeds of sales were applied

IX
sales of bonds suspenderl in October, 1877, on account of the agitation of the repeal of
the resumption act and the remonetization of silver.

IX
associates (syndicate) informed June 19, 1877, that as 4 per cent. bonds were sold for

gond, it was not anticipated that the government would sanction or tolerate their
redemption or payment of interest in coin of less value than the coin authorized by
law at the time they were issued

IX
amount of 45 per cent. bonds sold for resumption purposes.

XIL
Golel, the importance of, as the standard of value is conceded by all.

XXII
has been practically the sole standard in the United States since 1834.

XXII
has been the sole standard in Great Britain since 1815

XXII
Gold and silver, various experiments made with a view of keeping both in circulation..

XXII
ratios of value established at different times

XXII
an international convention of commercial nations suggested as a means of securing a
more tixed relative value of

XXX
Government property, receipts from sales of, for the fiscal year ended June 3, 1877.

III
Imports, coin value of, for the tiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

XXVII
of specie anı bullion...

XXVIIT
Indians, expenses for, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

IN
Interest, annual saving of, by reducing the rate from 6 to 4 percent. on debt now redeemable.

X
annual saving of, by reducing the rate from 6 to 4 per cent on debt redeemable by the 1st
of May, 1801

X
reduction of, from 6 to 4 per cent., will be arrested by any measure that creates doubts
or distrust

X
Internal revenue, receipts from, for the fiscal year ended June 3, 1877.

III
receipts from, for 1876 and 1677, from the various objects of taxation

XXX
Internal revenue stamps, heretofore printed in New York, now printed in the Bureau of
Engraving and Printing.

XXXVII
Joint resolution of July 22, 1876, provides for the issue of silver coin in exchange for legal.
tenders to the amount of $10,000,000

XIX
limits amount of silver coin and fractional currency.

XLX
Lands, public, receipts from sales of, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

III
Legal-tender notes, redeemed, retired, and canceled since March 1, 1877

XII
amount of, outstanding December 1, 1877

XIT
outstanding January 1, 1879,1 to be redeemed in coin, under act of January 14, 1875..

XII

Page.
Legal-tender notes, redeemed, after January 1, 1875, may, in the opinion of the Secretary,
be reissued, as the exigencies of the public service may require

XIX
legal-tender quality of, was intended to maintain them in forced circulation at a time
when their depreciation was inevitable

XV
when redeemable in coin, legal-tender quality of, may be withdrawn or retained with-
out affecting their use as currency in ordinary times..

XV
legal-tender quality of, should be maintained to meet the contingency of an unreason.

able demand for coin during a sudden panic..
Legislation recommended :
giving the sanction of Congress to the assurance that the obligations of the govern-

ment shall not be paid in a coin of less value than that it demanded and received for
these obligations

X
to authorize the Secretary of the Treasury to sell bonds for coin or its equivalent in
United States notes

TI
to authorize the Secretary of the Treasury to gradually fund into 4 per cent bonds all

United States notes in excess of $:300,000,000, the bonds to be issued at par in coin or
its equivalent in United States notes

XIII
to definitely settle the question whether United States notes redeemed when the out-
standing amount is less than $300,000,000 can be reissued

XIV
authorizing the issue of certificates for small deposits, convertible into 4 per cent.

bonds, the proceeds to be used for the redemption of bonds bearing a higher rate of
interest

XIX
repealing the limitation upon the amount of fractional coin to be issued in excbange for
United States notes

XIX
to discontinue the trade-dollar in case another silver dollar is authorized

XX
to authorize the coinage and issue of a silver dollar with such legislative provisions as
will maintain it at par with gold.

XXI
creating a special tribunal for the trial of customs-revenue cases at New York.

XXV
changes in existing law recommended by the commission to investigate the New York
custom-louse commended to the consideration of Congress.

XXVI
to impose a duty of two cents par pound on coffee and ten cents per pound on tea XXVIII
to require persons exporting merchandise to Canada by land conveyance to file mani.
fests containing quantities and values...

XXVIII
to so change existing law as to offer increased inducements for parties having knowl.

edge of frauds on the revenue to bring them to the attention of customs-officers... XXIX
to adopt specific duties, as far as practicable, in order to secure simplicity and uniform.
ity in the collection of the revenue from customs......

XXX
to abolish the port of Sitka, Alaska

XXX
to change and modify various existing laws relative to the settlement of claims against
the government

XXXII to XXXV
to provide for the construction of a substantial fire-proof building for the Bureau of En.
graving and Printing

XXXVIII
for the proper disposition of the large accumulation of minor coins in the Treasury for
which there is no demand

XXXVIII
to encourage American ship-building,

XLI
to authorize the construction of a light-draught steam revenue-cutter for service on the
Gulf coast between Mobile and Lake Pontchartrain

XLII
to organize the life-saving service under an administration defined by law

XLIII
to increase the compensation of keepers of life-saving stations

XLIII
to extend the benefits of the marine-hospital service to destitute American seamen re.
turned to the United States under section 4577, Revised Statates,

XLT
that section 4405 R S. be so amended as to give the Secretary of the Treasury authority

to convene the board of supervising inspectors of steamboats at such time and place
as he sball designate

XLVI
Life saving service, report of, affords a gratifying exhibit.

XLIII
number of new districts organized during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

XLIII
number of life-saving and life-boat stations established during the same period..

XLIII
an increase of the compensation of keepers recommended

XLIII
importance of the service requires that it should be placed under an administration de-
fined by law

XLIII
improvements in life-saving apparatus..

..XLIII, XLIV
Light-house establishment:

number of light-houses, light-ships, river lights, and fog-signals put into operation dur.
ing the tiscal year ended June 30, 1877

XLIV
light-ship No. 42, now in course of construction, is expected to be the best ever built by
the government...

XLIV
attention called to the importance of providing for a new light-house at American Shoal
and Rebecca Shoal, Florida reefs, for which estimates have been made.

XLIV
change in the mode of paying light-louse keepers suggested

XLIV
Loans, six per cent., amount of, now redeemable at the pleasure of the government.

X
Marine-hospital service:
amount of dues received during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

XLV
amount of expenditures during the same period

XLV
number of sick and disabled seamen treated during the year.

XLV
average cost, per patient treated.

XLV
recommends that the benefits of the marine-hospital service be extended to American
seamed returned to the United States under section 4577, Revised Statutes

XLV
the appointinent of medical officers to the grade of assistant surgeon only, and their

promotion to the higher grades as vacancies occur have produced satisfactory results.. XLT
Military establishment, expenses of, including river and harbor improvements and arsenals,
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877..

III
Minor coins, in circulation, and legal-tender for limited amounts since 1853

XI
large accumulation of, in the Treasury vaults for which there is no demand

XXXVIII
legislation for the disposition of, recommended...

XXXVIII
Mints and assay offices, management, and amount, accuracy and perfection of work of, highly
satisfactory

XIX
Money, current, the rapid appreciation of, to the coiu standard should be accompanied by
diminished expenses in the public service...

VII

Page.
Money, paper, no system of, has yet been established in any country that in times of panic or

adverse trade has prevented the drain and exhaustion of coin reserves, however large
and well guarded

XV
every system of, must provide for suspension of specie payments.....

XV
National banks, number of, in existence on November 1, 1877

XVI
amount of receipts from tax on circulation and deposits of, for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1877

III
amount of circulating notes of, retired during the year from November 1, 1876, to No.
veniber 1, 1877

XVI
amount of circulating notes of, issued during the same period..

XVI
aggregate amount of circulation of, outstanding

XVI
amount of loans and discount of

XVI
general solvency of, and benefit to the people as now organized

XVI
bave been less subject to revulsion or failure than any other corporations or firms..

XVI
notes of, should be convertible into coin

XVI
comparison of reserves and condition of, with reserves and condition of other banking
systems in specie-paying times gives assurance that they are able to redeem their
notes in coin at any date fixed upon by the government

XVI
should not enjoy the franchise of circulating their own non-interest-bearing notes as
money unless they are prepared to redeem them

XVI
present system of redeeming notes of, at the Treasury of the United States, can be con.
tinued after United States notes are at par with coin as well as now.

XVII
will naturally hold United States notes as reserves if maintained in circulation at par
with coin

XVII
security of holders of notes of.

XVII
amount of capital stock of

XVII
amount of surplus fund and other individed profits of..

XVII
present market value of circulating note of

XVII
as government agents or depositaries could greatly assist in the process of refunding.. XVII
National-bank notes, amount of, issued since March 1, 1877

XII
redemption of, at the Treasury, under the present system is a great convenience to the
banks and the public, and should be continued

XVIII
cost of redemption of

XVIII
Naval establishment, expenses of, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

III
Paper money, no system of, has yet been established in any country that in times of panic

or adverse trade has prevented the drain and exhaustion of coin reserves, however
large and well guarded

XV
every system of, must provide for suspension of specie payments

XV
Pacific railway companies, receipts from payment of interest by, during the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1877

III
Pensions, expenses on account of, during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877

III
Public buildings, recommends that appropriations be made according to estimates for con.
tinuation of work on those now in course of construction

XLVII
recommends that no new buildings be authorized except in cases where the demands
of the public service seem to make them an absolute necessity

XLVII
calls attention to the recommendation of the Supervising Architect for the construction

of a building for the accommodation of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing ...XLVI, XLVII
Public expenditures, reduction of, can only be accomplished by a careful revision of exist-
ing laws

VII
Public credit. if no questions had arisen to disturb the, six percent. bonds could have been

paid off rapidly with proceeds of four per cent. bouds sold at par in coin or its equiv.
alent

X
the highest, can only be secured by a constant observance of every public engagement

construed according to its letter and spirit
is injured by failure to redeem United States notes.

XIII
Public debt, expense for interest on, during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

III
Public lands, receipts from sales of, during the tiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

III
Receipts, ordinary, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877..

III
ordinary, surplus of. over ordinary expenses

III
for first quarter of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878
estimated for the second, third, and fourth quarters of the fiscal year ending June 30,
1-78.

IV
estimated, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1879.

VI
Revenue, internal, receipts from, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877

III
Kevenue, total, decrease in amount of, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877, as compared

with 1876
surplus, amonnt of, for fiscal year ended June 30, 1877

IV
surplus, estimated amount of, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

IV
from customs, greatest loss to, arises from undervaluations.

XXIX, XXX
frauds on, by undervaluation, etforts to prevent, have not been entirely successful. XXVII
Revenue marine service, number of vessels employed in. ...

XLI
operations of, during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

XLII
expense of maintaining the, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877

XLII
cadet system provided for, by act of July 31, 1876, has been entered upon with promise
of great advantage

XLII
construction of a light-draught steam-cutter for service on the Gulf coast between Mo-
bile Bay and Lake Pontchartrain recommended

XLII
Savings banks, deposits held by, and number of depositors.

XIX
Silver, is of the inost general use for coinage

XXI
is a part of every system of coinage, even in countries where gold is the sole standard. XXI
best measures the common wants of life, but is not a convenient medium in the larger
exchanges of commerce

XXI
production of, is reasonably steady

XXI
variation in market value of, and gold, which no human law can prevent, has driven all
nations to adopt one or the other as the sole standard of value, or to authorize an
alternative standard of either, or to coin both at an arbitrary standard...

XXI
France and other Latin nations have suspended the coinage of

XXII
provisions of act of February 21, 1853, relative to coinage of, and ratio of value to gold. XXII

IV

Page.
Silver, other conditions on which can be maintained in circulation at par with gold..XX, XXI, XXII
great changes have occurred in the market value of, since 1873

XXIII
evil effects that would follow the free coinage of...

.XXIII, XXIV
market value of, is fixed by the world and not by the United States alone, and is af.
fected by the whole mass in the world......

XXIV
free coinage of, will impair the pledge made of the customs duties by the act of Feb.
ruary, 1862, for the payment of the interest on the public debt.

XXIV
Silver coin, beneficial results likely to follow the issue of, in pursuance of the general pol.
icy of the act of 1853

XXIX
act of January 14, 1875, provides for the substitution of, for fractional currency.

XIX
issue of, in exchange for legal-tenders for a limited amount under joint resolution of
July 22, 1876

XIX
amount to be issued limited

XIX
fractional, repeal of the limitation upon the amount of, to be issued in exchange for
United States notes recommended.

XIX
fractional, is readily taken by the people and maintained at par with United States
notes without difficulty..

XX
estimated amount of, in circulation in 1860 at par with gold..
amount of, maintained in circulation in Great Britain at par with gold..

XX
true limit of, is the demand that may be made for its use..
no danger of an excess of, being issued if only issued in exchange for United States
notes

XI
Silver dollars, have not been in circulation in the United States since 1837.

XI
old, coinage of, recommended by the commission organized by Congress.

XXI
if restored to our coinage, should be subject to the same rules as to issue and converti.
bility as other forms of money..

XXI
coinage and issue of, recommended with such legislative provisions as will maintain
them at par with gold...

XXI
whole amount of, issued prior to 1853.

XXIII
amount of, issued between 1833 and 1873.

XXIII
Silver and gold, various experiments made with a view of keeping both in circulation..

XXII
ratios of value established at different times...

XXII
an international convention of commercial nations suggested as a means of securing a

more fixed relative value of..
Sinking-fund, amount due the, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

IV
deticiency on account of, for same period
amount required for, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.
estimated deficit on account of, for the same period.

amount required for, for the tiscal year ending June 30, 1879.
Sitka, Alaska, port of, abolition of, recommended.

XIX
Specie and bullion, exports and imports of.

XXVIII
Specie payinents, every system of paper money must provide for a suspension of.

power to make suspension of, should not be intrusted to individuals, but should be

determined by events and conditions known to all.
Special agents, transactions of division of

XXXVIII
recommends that number of, be increased from twenty to at least thirty.

XXXIX
Spirits, tax-paid, withdrawn from warehouse

XXXI
Statistics of exports and imports...

...... XXVII, XXVIII, XXIX, XXX
Steamboat-inspection service:
number of vessels inspected during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877..

XLVI
amount collected on account of fees for inspecting steam-vessels..

XLVI
amount received from otticers' licenses.

XLVI
amount expended, salaries of inspectors and clerks

XLVI
for traveling and miscellaneous

XLVI
recommends that the Secretary of the Treasury be authorized to convene the board of
supervisiug inspectors at such time and place as he shall designate.

XLVI
invites attention to recommendations of the Supervising Inspector General,

XLVI
Sugar, embarrassments attending the collection of duties on, under Schedule G, title 33, of
the Revised Statutes

XXVI
the Dutch standard as a basis for the assessment of duty on, insatisfactory

XXVI
Surplus revenue, amount of, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

IT
amount of, applied to the redemption of United States notes.

IV
to the redemption of fractional currency.
to the redemption of 6 per cent bonds for sinking-fund
to the increase of cash balance in the Treasury

IV
estimated amount of, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.
Tariff, revision of the desirable.

XXVII
many dutiable articles paying less than $10,000 each might be added to the free list in
case the duty on tea and coffee is restored

XXVII
Tea, imposition of a duty of ten cents per pound on, recommended.

XXVII
Tobacco, manufactured, quantity of, on which tax of twenty-four cents per pound was
paid.

XXXI
Tonnage, total, of American vessels as reported by the Register of the Treasury.

XXXIX
total for the last two years

XXXIX
total, of vessels built during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

XXXIS
of American vessels entered into ports of the United States from foreign ports, and

cleared from ports in the United States for foreign ports, during the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1877.....

XLI
of foreign vessels entered into ports of the United States from foreign ports, and cleared

from ports in the United States to foreign ports, during the fiscal year ended June 3,
1877

XLI
preponderance of foreign, over domestic..

XLI
Treasurer, the report of, sets forth in detail the monetary transactions of the government. XXXVIII
Tradle-dollar, provisions of the act of 1873 relative to the coinage of..

XX
legal-tender character of, abolished by joint resolution of July 22, 1876.

XX
joint resolution of July 22, 1876, authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to limit the

coinage to an amount sufficient to meet the export demand....
export demand for, ceased in October, 1877, and coinage of, was stopped....

[ocr errors]

Page.
Trade dollar, discontinuance of, recommended in case another silver dollar is authorized..
amount of, issued.

XX, XXIII
Undervaluations, extensive, have occurred in the entry of silk goods during the past year.. XXVII
frauds on the revenue by.

XXVII
Vessels, American, tonnage of, as reported by the Register of the Treasury

XXXIX
total tonnage of, for the last two years...

XXXIX
number and tonnage of, built during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

XXXIX
number of, to wbich official numbers have been awarded during the same period. XXXIX
number of, numbered and registered from July 1 to November 16, 1877.

XL
discriminations in regard to enrollment of certain classes of.

XL
modification of present system of enrollment of, suggested

XL
number of entrances of, into ports of the United States from foreign ports during the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1877..

XLI
number of clearances of, from ports of the United States to foreign ports during the
same period

XLI
number of entrances and clearances in like manner of foreign vessels during the same
period

XLI
tonnage of American and foreign vessels entered and cleared.

XLI
preponderance of foreign over American tonnage.....

XLI

TABLES ACCOMPANYING THE REPORT.

TABLE A.-Statement of the net receipts (by warrants) during the fiscal year ended June
30, 1877

3
TABLE B._Statement of the pet disbursements (by warrants) during the fiscal year ended

June 30, 1877
TABLE C.-Statement of the issue and redemption of loans and Treasury notes (by warrants)

for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877
Table D.-Statement of the net receipts and disbursements (by warrants) for the quarter
ended September 30, 1877.

7
TABLE E.-Statement of outstanding principal of the public debt of the United States on the

1st of January of each year from 1791 to 1843, inclusive, and on the 1st of July of each

year from 1844 to 1877, inclusive
TABLE F.-Statement of the receipts of the United States from March 4, 1789, to June 30,

1877, by calendar years to 1843, and by fiscal years (ended June 30) from that time.. ... 10, 11, 12, 13
TABLE G.- Statement of the expenditures of the United States from March 4, 1789, to June

30, 1877, by calender years to 1843, and by fiscal years (ended June 30) from that time 14, 15, 16, 17
TABLE H.-Statement showing the condition of the sinking-fund from its institution in May,
1869, to and including June 30, 1877.

18, 19, 20
TABLE I.-Statement showing the purchases of bonds on account of the sinking-fund dur-

ing each fiscal year from its institution in May, 1869, to and including June 30, 1877... 21, 22, 23
TABLE K. Statement of loaus made by the United States from 1776 to 1877, inclusive..

21-34
TABLE L.-Statement of 30-year 6 per cent. bouds (interest payable Jannary and July)

issued to the several Pacific railway companies, under the acts of July 1, 1862 (12 Statutes,
492), and July 2, 1864 (13 Statutes, 359)

3.7. 36
TABLE M.-Returns, by judgment of the United States Court of Claims, of proceeds of prop.

erty seized as captured or abandoned under act of March 12, 1863, paid from July 1, 1876,
to June 30, 1877

37
TABLE N.-Judgment of the United States Court of Claims of proceeds of property seized

as captured or abandoned under act of March 12, 1863, rendered but not paid, during the
tiscal year ended June 30, 1877

37
TABLE 0.-Receipts and disbursements of the United States assistant treasurers for the year
ended June 30 1877.....

37, 38, 39, 40, 41
APPENDIX A.
Statement showing the condition of the bonded debt and amount of saving by interest
thereon if converted into four per cent. bonds.......

44
APPENDIX B.
Report of the transactions of the division of special agents..

APPENDIX C.
Statement of customs-refunds made by the Treasury Department during the fiscal year end.
ing June 30, 1077.- (Report required by section 4, act March 3, 1875)

16-74
Exhibits A, B, C, D, E, É G, H, I, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, and V. decisions of the
Treasury Department under which refunds were made.... 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 42, 43, 84, 85, 86, 87,

88, 89, 90
II.-REPORTS OF TREASURY OFFICERS.
Commissioner of Internal Revenue
Administration, changes in, made during the fiscal year 1876–77 :
prohibiting the employment of otficers in the same collection district related by blood
or marriage

1:23
providing for the quarterly examination by four revenne agents of the offices of collect.

ors and deputy collectors with a monetary responsibility, and for the qnarterly
inspection by seventeen revenue agents of all internal revenue offices throughout
the country by districts

1:29, 130
requiring gaugers to report length and mean iliameter of all packages of spirits gauged,
so that errors in gauging may be more easily detected

129
requiring reasonable notice where testimony is to be taken in cases of claims for abate-

ment, refunding, draw back, &c., so that the Commissioner may have time to arrange
for cross-examination of witnesses

129
Appropriations :
balance of, for last fiscal year unexpended, amount of ($78,000)

130
for "dies, paper, and stamps," six persons employed in New York paid ont of

127
for fiscal year 1879, estimate of

130

[ocr errors]
« SebelumnyaLanjutkan »