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tude and azimuth determined at Long Shoal Point, and at Hog Island, North Carolina; hydrography completed in Cove Sound and Bogue Sound, North Carolina; topography of the vicinity of Cape Fear River, at Wilmington, N. C.; primary triangulation across the boundary be tween North Carolina and South Carolina; examination of harbors and sounds for sailing-notes between Cape Fear and Saint Mary's River, Georgia; tidal observations at Fernandina, Fla.; survey of Saint John's River, Florida, from Jacksonville southward to Hogarth's Bay; hydrography of the coast-approaches between Matanzas Inlet and Mosquito Inlet, Florida; survey of the coast and sea-water channels near Cape Cañaveral, with parts of the Banana River and Indian River; topog raphy and hydrography of the western coast of Florida, from Cedar Keys northward to Horseshoe Point; hydrography of the Gulf coast from Pine Point westward to Choctawhatchie, including Saint Andrew's Bay and its approaches; determination of points by triangulation in Kentucky, between Cumberland Gap and Lancaster Court-House; measurement of base-line and selection of points in Tennessee for triangulation between Knoxville and Nashville; triangulation in the northwestern part of Alabama; hydrographic development of the Gulf of Mexico by numerous lines of deep-sea soundings and temperature-observations; topography of the shores of Barataria Bay, Louisiana; special hydrographic survey of Cubett's Gap, and from thence to the head of the passes, Mississippi River, and of Southwest Pass; detailed survey of the shores and waters of that river between Bonnet Carre and Point Houmas; height of the water recorded regularly at New Orleans with a tide-gauge; reconnaissance for geodetic points in Illinois, and through Missouri westward toward the Wasatch Mountains; points determined in the vicinity of Madison, Wis.; and on the coast of Texas the triangulation of Laguna Madre from Corpus Christi Bay southward to Baffin's Bay.

On the Pacific coast of the United States, beginning at the southern boundary of California, the work of the year has included reconnaissance for triangulation-points between San Diego and Santa Barbara; topography of the western part of Santa Catalina Island; inspection of fieldparties near the shores of Santa Barbara Channel; connection of Anacapu and Santa Barbara Island, by triangulation, with stations on the main coast of California; hydrography of the approaches to San Miguel and Santa Rosa Island; supplementary soundings in the vicinity of Santa Monica, Cal.; inshore hydrography eastward of Point Conception, and lines of soundings across the Santa Barbara Channel; topography of the coast north of Point Conception toward Point Arguello; reconnaissance for triangulation between Los Angeles and Point Arguello; tidal observations at Fort Point and at Saucelito, San Francisco Bay; geodetic measurements and determinations of latitude and azimuth at Mount Diablo and Mount Helena; reconnaissance for geodetic points between the Sierra Nevada and Salt Lake City; topography of the coast of California from Timber Gulch northward to Stewart's Point Landing; reconnaissance for triangulation-points in the coast-range of mountains north of Mount Ross and Sulphur Peak; hydrography of the coast of Oregon from Tillamook Head northward to Columbia River entrance; topography of the shores and soundings in the Columbia River between Cathlamet and Cottonwood Island; tidal observations at Astoria and at Port Townsend, Washington Territory; erection of signals for triangulation across the waters of Washington Sound and the Strait of Fuca; additional soundings along the shores of Whidbey Island and Admiralty Inlet, Washington Territory; topography of the shores of

Admiralty Inlet and Calvas Passage from Point Orchard south to the entrance of Commencement Bay; inspection of topographical work in this section, and as yet in progress, the hydrography of Commencement Bay, Washington Territory.

The compilation has been kept steadily in hand of sailing-notes and other maritime data pertaining to the Coast Pilot for navigation along the seaboard of California, Oregon, and Washington Territory; and also for the Coast Pilot of Alaska.

Progress commensurate with the field-work has been made in the work of the Coast Survey Office, which comprises the computations of all geodetic, trigonometric, and magnetic observations, including the arrangement for publication of the records and results; the drawing of the hydrographic charts from the records of soundings; the reduction of the original topographical and hydrographic maps for publication; the engraving, electrotyping, printing, and issue of the same, as well as the maintenance of the instruments used in the survey. Tidetables of the principal ports of the United States for the year 1878 have been published; the drawing of sixty-one charts has been in progress, of which number twenty-eight have been completed, including sixteen charts for publication by photolithography; nine new copperplate engravings have been begun; one hundred and nine engraved plates have received additions, and twenty-one have been completed; an aggregate of eighteen thousand eight hundred and forty-two copies of charts has been issued; two thousand eight hundred and thirty copies of the Coast Survey Reports have been distributed; and the second volume of the Atlantic Coast Pilot, comprising the coast from Boston to New York, has been in preparation, and will be published before the close of the year. Respectfully submitted.

C. P. PATTERSON, Superintendent United States Coast Survey.

Hon. JOHN SHERMAN,
Secretary of the Treasury,
Washington, D. C.

INDEX.

I.-REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Act of February 21, 1853, provisions of, relative to coinage of silver and its ratio of value to
gold..

Act of May 18, 1872, provisions of, relative to the proceeds of certain cotton..
Act of June 22, 1874, to amend the customs-revenue laws and repeal moieties, effect of, has
not been salutary....

Act of January 14, 1875, requires the Secretary of the Treasury to redeem legal-tender notes
to the amount of 80 per centum of the sum of national-bank notes issued, until the out-
standing legal-tenders shall be $300,000,000 and no more.
provides for the exchange and substitution of silver coin for fractional currency.
authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to issue, sell, and dispose of either description
of bonds authorized by the act of July 14, 1870, at not less than par in coin...
authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues not otherwise ap-
propriated to prepare and provide for resuming specie payments.
provides that, on and after January 1, 1879, the Secretary of the Treasury shall redeem
in coin the United States legal-tender notes then outstanding.
Alaska, since the withdrawal of the troops from, the management of the Territory has prac
tically devolved upon the Treasury Department..

apprehended conflicts between whites and Indians, upon the withdrawal of the troops,
have not been realized...

white population at Sitka very small

collector of customs at Sitka and his deputies stationed at other points the only officers
who could exercise authority....

the expenses of collecting the customs largely exceed the receipts from customs..
abolition of the port of Sitka recommended.

amount of tax collected on seal-skins taken on Saint Paul and Saint George Islands, in-
cluding rent paid by the Alaska Commercial Company for the fiscal years ended June
30, 1876, and June 30, 1877.

Appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1879, can be reduced $11,000,000 below the

estimates without crippling any branch of the public service

for 1879 should not exceed $140,000,000 exclusive of interest and sinking fund...
permanent annual, to be covered into the Treasury, under act of June 20, 1874..
Acknowledgments to heads of bureaus and other officers for the faithful manner in which

they have performed their duties.

Bonds issued prior to February 12, 1873, public policy and enlightened self-interest require
should be paid in the coin then in circulation and contemplated by both parties as
the medium of payment....

four and one-half per cent., impediment to the sale of

amount of, sold under contract of August 24, 1876, to March 1, 1877.

sale of, limited to $200,000,000 by notice, in May, 1877...

amount of, sold for resumption purposes.

four per cent., terms of contract for the sale of, made on June 9, 1877.

amount of, sold under contract of June 9, 1877

how proceeds of sales of, were applied..

Banks, national. (See National banks.)

XXII

.. XXIV, XXV

XXVIII

Page.

report of commission to investigate the
reduction of force in

XI
XIX

XII

XII

XII

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX
XXX
XXX

XXX

VII
VII

XXXIII

XLVII

XI
XI

VIII
VIII
XII
VIII, IX

IX
IX

Banks and bankers, complaints of, in regard to the tax on their deposits.

XVII

attention of Congress invited to what the Comptroller of the Currency says in his re-
port as to the repeal of the tax on deposits.

the Secretary does not recommend the repeal of the tax on deposits for reasons stated..
Bullion, exportation of, has been arrested, and domestic supply accumulated in the Treasury.
and specie, exports and imports of
Bureau of Engraving and Printing....

XVII
XVIII
XII
XXVIII

XXXVI, XXXVII, XXXVIII
a large balance of appropriation for labor and expenses in, will remain unexpended at
the close of the year ending June 30, 1878
system of doing business in, gives ample security against frauds and mistakes.
work done in, is more perfectly done than that heretofore done in private establishments.
internal-revenue stamps heretofore printed in New York will be printed in, during the

XXXVI
XXXVII
XXXVII

current year

XXXVI

also backs of legal-tender notes and five-dollar national currency notes, heretofore done
by the Columbian Bank-Note Company

XXXVI

contracts of certain bank-note companies for printing notes and stamps terminated by
notice, and the work transferred to the
XXXVI, XXXVII
XXXVIII
XXXVIII
XXXVIII

construction of a fire-proof building for the accommodation of, recommended..
Buildings, public, recommends that appropriations be made according to estimates for con-

tinuation of work upon, now in course of construction..

recommends that no new, be authorized except in cases where the demands of the public
service seem to make them an absolute necessity.

XLVII
XLVII

calls attention to recommendation of Supervising Architect for the construction of a
building for the accommodation of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.........................XLVI, XLVII

Claims against the government

Page.
XXXII, XXXIII, XXXIV, XXXV
attention of Congress called to the laws imposing upon the Treasury Department the
adjudication of a multitude of.

old, should be carefully scrutinized

of long standing, and supported by ex parte affidavits, should not be adjudicated in the
Treasury Department.

various suggestions relative to the treatment of.

XXXII
XXXII, XXXIII, XXXIV, XXXV
changes and modifications of existing laws in respect to, suggested or recommended... XXXV
known as "charges and commission cases," arising under act of March 3, 1851..
amount paid on.

XXXIII
XXXIII

XXXIII

XXXIII

XXXIII

XXXIV

no more should be paid on, until after full investigation.

full details of those now pending will be submitted to Congress

for refund of taxes illegally imposed under internal-revenue tax laws.

of loyal citizens in States not in rebellion...

for proceeds of certain cotton, action of department upon

Coast Survey, operations of, during the year.

Coffee, imposition of a duty of two cents per pound on, recommended.
Canada, returns of domestic exports to, incomplete..

.XXXIV, XXX

legislation recommended, requiring persons exporting merchandise by land conveyance

to, to file manifests containing the quantities and values thereof.
Coin, receipts from premium on sales of, during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.
fractional silver, act of January 14, 1875, provides for substitution of, for fractional
currency

is readily taken by the people and maintained at par with United States notes without
difficulty...

estimated amount of, in circulation in 1860, at par with gold..
amount of, maintained in circulation in Great Britain, at par with gold..
true limit of, is the demand that may be made for its issue...

no danger of an excess of, being issued, if only issued in exchange for United States

notes....

silver, conditions on which, can be issued with beneficial effect..

beneficial results likely to follow the issue of, in pursuance of the general policy of the
act of 1853

XX

XXIV, XXV

XXIV
XXI

XXI

Coin and coinage, silver tokens and paper money, if limited to amounts needed for business,
can be kept in circulation at par with gold.

growing tendency to adopt for coins the principle of redeemability applied to different
forms of paper money

with the quality of redeemability and limiting the amount of issue, tokens of inferior
intrinsic value may be kept in circulation without depreciating below the paper
money into which they are convertible.

Coinage, receipts from profits on, during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

of gold and silver and relative value of, to each other, and their legal-tender qualities,
the subject of discussion in all civilized countries...

act of 1873, provisions of, relative to the coinage of trade-dollars.
Collection districts, internal-revenue, number of, July 1, 1876, and June 30, 1877.
Collectors, internal-revenue, number of, July 1, 1876, and June 30, 1877
Commissioner of Internal Revenue, attention of Congress invited to report of.
Commissions, organization of, under direction of the President, to investigate the man-
ner in which the customs business has been conducted at many of the principal
ports

XXXII
VII

if no questions had arisen to disturb the, six per cent. bonds could have been paid off
rapidly with the proceeds of four per cent. bonds, sold at parin coin or its equivalent.
Currency, best system of, for the people

fractional, act of January 14, 1875, provides for exchange and substitution of silver

coin for..

provisions of joint resolution of July 22, 1876, relative to issue of silver coin in exchange
for....

XXV, XXVI

aggregate of, and silver coin outstanding not to exceed $50,000,000..

estimated amount of, lost or destroyed

national-bank, aggregate amount of, outstanding.

present market value thereof

Customs-revenue, amount of, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1877.

for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1876

for the first quarter of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878..

frauds on, by undervaluation, efforts to prevent, have not been attended with entire

XLV
XXVII
XXVIII

XXVIII

III

XIX

XX

XX

XX

action taken by the Treasury Department in pursuance of recommendations of, has

worked a marked improvement in the conduct of the customs service..
to investigate the custom-house at San Francisco, recommendations of.
Commerce and navigation.

Comptroller of the Currency, attention of Congress invited to report of.
Cotton-claims under act of May 18, 1872, action of the department relative to.. .............XXXIV, XXXV
Credit-money can better be issued and redeemed by corporations than by the government..
Credit, public, the highest, can only be secured by a constant observance of every public

XIV

engagement, construed according to its letter and spirit.....

success

greatest loss to, arises from undervaluation.
Customs-duties, policy of collecting the, in gold coin the chief cause of upholding and

advancing the public credit..

XXI

III

XXXIX, XL, XLI
XVI

Customs-service, conduct of, has been greatly improved by action of department on recom.
mendations of investigating commissions.

XIX

XX

Debt, amount of, redeemable before May 1, 1881.
Deficiency, estimated, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1879..

Deposits, small, by the people, attention of Congress called to the value of the organization
of some plan for the collection, safe-keeping, and profitable employment of.
importance of a general system for, throughout the United States

the making of money-order post-offices places of deposit, and the issue of government
certificates for such deposit, convertible on demand into 4 per cent. bonds, sug-
gested as a feasible plan

amount of, held by savings-banks, and number of depositors...

XXXI
XXXI
XXXI

XXVI
XXIV

XXVII

XXIX, XXX

XXIV
XXVI

X
VII

X

X
XV

XIX

XIX

XIX

XIX

XVI

XVII
III
XXV
XXV

XVIII

XVIII

XVIII
XIX

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