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other such harmless matter; I like him worse than I did.

The Interpreter then replied, This robin is an emblem very apt to set forth some professors by; for, to sight, they are as this robin, pretty of note, colour, and carriage: they seem also to have a very great love for professors that are sincere ; and, above all others, to desire to sociate with them, and to be in their company, as if they could live upon the good man's crumbs. They pretend also that therefore it is that they frequent the house of the godly and the appointments of the Lord; but when they are by themselves, as the robin, they can catch and gobble up spiders ; they can change their diet, drink iniquity, and swallow down sin like water.

So when they were come again into the house, because supper as yet was not ready, Christiana again desired WHICH YET LIES that the Interpreter would either shew or tell of some other things that are profitable.

Then the Interpreter began, and said, The fatter the sow is, the more she desires the mire; the fatter the ox is, the more gamesomely he goes to the slaughter; and the more healthy the lustful man is, the more prone

he is unto evil. There is a desire in women to go neat and fine; and it is a comely thing to be adorned with that which in God's sight is of great price.

'Tis easier watching a night or two than to sit up a whole year together; so 'tis easier for one to begin to profess well, than to hold out as he should to the end.

Every shipmaster, when in a storm, will willingly

PRAY, AND YOU
WILL GET AT THAT

UNREVEALED.

N

cast that overboard which is of the smallest value in the vessel; but who will throw the best out first? None but he that feareth not God.

One leak will sink a ship, and one sin will destroy a sinner.

He that forgets his friend is ungrateful unto him; but he that forgets his Saviour is unmerciful to himself.

He that lives in sin, and looks for happiness hereafter, is like him that soweth cockle, and thinks to fill his barn with wheat or barley.

If a man would live well, let him fetch his last day to him, and make it always his company-keeper.

Whispering and change of thoughts prove that sin is in the world.

If the world, which God sets light by, is counted a thing of that worth with men, what is Heaven, that God commendeth ?

If the life that is attended with so many troubles is so loth to be let go by us, what is the life above ?

Every body will cry up the goodness of men ; but who is there that is, as he should be, affected with the goodness of God?

We seldom sit down to meat, but we eat and leave : so there is in Jesus Christ more merit and righteousness than the whole world has need of. When the Interpreter had done, he takes them out

into his garden again, and had them to a tree whose inside was all rotten

and gone, and yet it grew, and had leaves. Then said Mercy, What means this? This tree, said he, whose outside is fair, and whose inside is rotten, is it, to which many may be compared that are in the

OF THE TREE THAT IS ROTTEN AT HEART.

garden of God; who with their mouths speak high in behalf of God, but indeed will do nothing for Him ; whose leaves are fair, but their heart good for nothing but to be tinder for the Devil's tinder-box.

Now supper was ready, the table spread, and all things set on the board ; so they sat down and did eat, when one had given thanks. And the Interpreter did usually entertain those that lodged with him with music at meals ; so the minstrels played.

There was also cne that did sing, and a very fine voice he had. His song was this:

THEY ARE AT

SUPPER.

The Lord is only my support,

And He that doth me feed :
How can I then want any thing

Whereof I stand in need?

TALK AT SUPPER.

A REPETITION OF

PERIENCE.

When the song and music was ended, the Interpreter asked Christiana, What it was that first did move her to betake herself to a Pilgrim's life? Christiana answered, First, The loss of

my

husband came CHRISTIANA's Exinto my mind, at which I was heartily grieved; but all that was but natural affection. Then, after that, came the troubles and pilgrimage of my husband into my mind, and also how like a churl I had carried it to him as to that. So guilt took hold of my mind, and would have drawn me into the pond; but that opportunely I had a dream of the well-being of my husband, and a letter sent me by the King of that Country, where my husband dwells, to come to Him. The dream and the letter together so wrought upon my mind, that they forced me to this way.

Int. But met you with no opposition before you set out of doors?

Chr. Yes; a neighbour of mine, one Mrs. Timorous, (she was akin to him that would have persuaded my husband to go back for fear of the Lions, she all-tobefooled me for, as she called it, my intended desperate adventure; she also urged what she could to dishearten me to it, the hardships and troubles that my husband met with in the way; but all this I got over pretty well. But a dream that I had of two illlooking ones, that I thought did plot how to make me miscarry in my journey, that hath troubled me much; yea, it still runs in my mind, and makes me afraid of every one that I meet, lest they should meet me to do me a mischief, and to turn me out of my Way. Yea, I may tell my Lord, though I would not have every body know it, that, between this and the Gate by which we got into the Way, we were both so sorely assaulted, that we were made to cry out Murder! and the two that made this assault upon us, were like the two that I saw in

my

dream. Then said the Interpreter, Thy beginning is good, thy latter end shall greatly increase. So he addressed

himself to Mercy, and said unto her, A QUESTION PUT And what moved thee to come hither,

sweetheart? Then Mercy blushed and trembled, and for a while continued silent.

Then said he, Be not afraid ; only believe, and speak thy mind.

So she began, and said, Truly, Sir, MERCY'S ANSWER.

my want of experience is that which

TO MERCY.

makes me covet to be in silence, and that also which fills me with fears of coming short at last. I cannot tell of visions and dreams, as my friend Christiana can; nor know I what it is to mourn for my refusing the counsel of those that were good relations.

Int. What was it then, dear heart, that hath prevailed with thee to do as thou hast done?

Mercy. Why, when our friend here was packing up to be gone from our town, I and another went accidentally to see her. So we knocked at the door, and went in. When we were within, and seeing what she was doing, we asked her, what was her meaning ? She said, she was sent for to go to her husband ; and then she up and told us how she had seen him in a dream, dwelling in a curious place among immortals, wearing a crown, playing upon a harp, eating and drinking at his Prince's table, and singing praises to Him for bringing him thither, &c. Now, methought, while she was telling these things unto us, my heart burned within me; and I said in my heart, If this be true, I will leave my father and my mother, and the land of my nativity, and will, if I may, go along with Christiana.

So I asked her further of the truth of these things, and if she would let me go with her? for I saw now, that there was no dwelling, but with the danger of ruin, any longer in our town. But yet I came away with a heavy heart; not for that I was unwilling to come away, but for that so many of

my

relations were left behind.

And I am come with all the desire of my heart; and

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