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THE C7

GENERAL STATUTES

OF THE

STATE OF NEVADA.

IN FORCE.

FROM 1861 TO 1885, INCLUSIVE.

WITH CITATIONS OF THE DECISIONS OF THE SUPREME

COURT RELATING THERETO.

ARRANGED AND ANNOTATED BY

DAV. E. BAILY AND JOHN D. HAMMOND.

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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year A. D. 1886,

BY DAV. E. BAILY AND JOHN D. HAMMOND, In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.

Rec. Sept. 17.1894

PREFACE.

The legislature of 1885, by an Act approved March fifth, appointed the undersigned to prepare a thoroughly arranged and annotated copy of such laws of the State of Nevada “of general and public interest” as should be in force on the thirty-first day of March, 1885. The work was also to contain “the constitution of this state, the laws of Congress in regard to naturalization, and the various Acts of Congress relating to the grants of land by the United States to the State of Nevada, with brief annotations or references to the decisions of the supreme court,” together with a comprehensive and complete index; and it was further provided that the said work should be done to the satisfaction and approval of the Justices of the Supreme Court, or a majority thereof.

It will at once be seen that such a work is essentially different from a Code. We had no authority whatever to change the law, to supply any omission or cure any defect, and yet were constantly called upon to judge as to what statutes were in force and of general, public interest, and to eliminate such as were obsolete, superseded or only of local and private effect. In view of these facts we have striven to keep upon the safe side-to give too much rather than too little. Our aim has been to embody in the work all necessary matter, yet to publish nothing superfluous or redundant.

The language of the original sections has not been changed, nor has any portion thereof been omitted, even though parts of some sections are plainly obsolete and parts of others' as plainly superseded. Where entire sections have been omitted or amendments substituted, the authority for the omission or change has uniformly been given. We have refrained from making notes upon the force or construction of any section or statute, except in a few important cases, when the authority for the same has been cited.

From the first, it has been deemed best that the work, if not too large, should be in one volume. To this end, we have condensed as much as possible. The enacting clause of each statute has been omitted, as well

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