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officer of any city or town having a seal, such mayor or other officer certifying the same under such seal; consul of the United States within such foreign country, certifying the same under the consular seal. The wife's acknowledgment must be separate and apart in a conveyance of the homestead.

Connecticut.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a judge of a court of record of the state or of the United States; commissioner of the school fund; judge of probate; clerk of the superior, common pleas, or district court; town clerk or assistant town clerk; commissioner of the superior court; notary public; justice of the peace. Out of the state and within the United States, by a commissioner for Connecticut appointed by the governor of Connecticut; any officer authorized to take ackncwledgments of deeds in the state where the acknowledgment is taken. Out of the United States, by a United States consul; notary public; justice of the peace. When taken by a uotary public or a justice of the peace, the certificate of the county clerk should be annexed.

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Delaware.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a judge of a court of record; chancellor; notary public; or two justices of the peace. Out of the state and within the United States, by a judge of a district or circuit court of the United States; chancellor or any judge of a court of record; mayor or chief officer of any city or borough, certified under the hand of such chancellor, judge, mayor, or officer, and the seal of his office, court, city, or borough; in open court, certified under the hand of the clerk and seal of the court; notary public, in which case a certificate of the clerk of the court of the county where the notary resides should be attached, certifying that he was duly commissioned; commissioner of deeds for Delaware appointed by the governor of Delaware. Out of the United States, by a consul-general, consul, or commercial agent, of the United States. In joint deeds of husband and wife, the wife must be examined separately and apart.

District of Columbia.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be made, in the district, before any judge of any court of the district; clerk of the district supreme court; a justice of the peace; notary public; or recorder of deeds; of the district. Out of the district and within the United States, before any judge of any court of record and of law; chancellor of a state; judge or justice of the supreme, circuit, or territorial courts of the United States; any justice of the peace; a notary public; or commissioner of deeds for the district appointed by the President of the United States; provided, that the certificate of acknowledgment, made by any officer of the state or territory, shall be accompanied by the certificate of the register, clerk, or other public officer, having official cognizance of the fact that the

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officer taking such acknowledgment was the officer he professed to be. Out of the United States, before any judge; notary public; secretary of legation or vice-consul general, consular officer, actual or acting, of the l'nited States; and when made before any other officer than a secretary of legation, consular officer, actual or acting, the official character of the person taking the acknowledgment shall be certified to in the manner prescribed for acknowledgments out of the district but in the United States.

Florida.--Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a judge or clerk of the circuit court; notary public; justice of the peace. Out of the state and within the United States, by a judge or clerk of a court of record; notary public; justice of the peace; judge of any court in the United States, or any state, territory, or district having a seal; commissioner for Florida appointed by the governor of Florida. Out of the United States, by any commissioner of deeds appointed by the governor of this state to reside in such country; notary public of such foreign country having a seal; any minister, charge d'affaires, consul-general, consul, vice-consul, commercial agent, or vice-commercial agent, of the United States appointed to reside in such country. In joint deeds of husband and wife, the wife must be examined separately and apart.

Georgia.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a clerk of the superior court; judge of any court of record; justice of the peace; notary public. Out of the state and within the United States, by a judge of a court of record; notary public; commissioner for Georgia appointed by the governor of Georgia. If taken before a judge, the acknowledgment must be accompanied by a certificate of the genuineness of the signature of the judge by the clerk, under the seal of such court. If taken before a notary public, the certificate of a clerk of a court of record under the seal of the court should be attached, showing the notary to be regularly commissioned and authorized by law to attest deeds. Out of the United States, by a consul or vice-consul of the United States. In joint deeds of husband and wife, the wife must be examined separately and apart.

Idaho.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a judge or clerk of a court having a seal; recorder of the proper county; notary public; justice of the peace. Out of the state and within the United States, hy a judge or clerk of any court of the United States, or of any court of any state or territory having a seal; commissioner for Idaho appointed by the governor of Idaho; any officer authorized to take acknowledgments by the laws of the place where taken. Out of the United States, by a judge or clerk of any court of any state, kingdom, or empire, having a seal; notary public; minister, commissioner, or consul, of the United States

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appointed to reside therein. A married woman's acknowledgment must be taken separately and apart.

Illinois.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a notary public; United States commissioner, who shall affix his seal; master in chancery; circuit or county clerk; justice of the peace, duly certified to, if out of the county where the land lies; any court of record having a seal, or any judge, justice, or clerk thereof. If the acknowledgment be taken before the court or the clerk thereof, the seal of the court must be affixed. Out of the state and within the United States, by a justice of the peace, duly certified to by the clerk of the proper court; notary public; United States commissioner; commissioner of deeds for Illinois appointed by the governor of Illinois; mayor of a city or clerk of a county, such officer affixing his official seal; judge, justice, or clerk, of the supreme, circuit, superior, district, county, or common pleas court of any of the United States or territories thereof; or the acknowledgment may be in conformity with the laws of the state where it is taken, in which case a certificate of conformity from a clerk of a court of record, under the seal of such court, is required. Out of the United States, by any court having a seal; mayor or chief officer of any city or town having a seal; minister, secretary of legation, or consul, of the United States in any foreign country, attested by his official seal; commissioner of deeds for Illinois; any officer authorized by the foreign law to take acknowledgments. If the latter have no official seal, proof that he is duly authorized is required. The acknowledgment may be taken in conformity with the foreign law, and so certified by any consul or minister of the United States, under his official seal.

Indian Territory.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the territory, by a judge or clerk of the United States court; United States commissioner; notary public. Out of the territory and within the United States, by a judge or clerk of any court of the United States, or any state or territory; notary public. Out of the United States, by a United States minister or consul.

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Indiana.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a judge or clerk of a court of record; auditor; recorder; county surveyor; mayor of a city; notary public; justice of the peace. Out of the state and within the United States, by a judge or clerk of a court of record; justice of the peace; auditor; recorder; notary public; mayor of a city; commissioner of deeds for Indiana appointed by the governor of Indiana; any officer having power to take acknowledgments in the state or territory where the acknowledgment is taken. Out of the United States, by a minister, charge d'affaires, or consul, of the United States; or any officer there

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authorized to take acknowledgments. A notary public must give the date of the expiration of his commission.

Iowa.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a court having a seal, or a judge or a clerk thereof; county auditor or his deputy; deputy clerk of a court; notary public; justice of the peace.

Out of the state and within the United States, by a court of record, or the officer holding the seal thereof; notary public; justice of the peace, duly certified to by the proper authority as to the official character of such justice; commissioner of deeds for Iowa appointed by the governor of Iowa. Out of the United States, by an ambassador, minister, secretary of legation, consul, charge d'affaires, consular agent, or any other officer of the United States in a foreign country who is authorized to issue certificates under the seal of the United States; any officer in a foreign country who is authorized by the laws thereof to take acknowledgments, in which case, however, the certificate must be authenticated by one of the above-named officers of the United States.

Kansas.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a court having a seal, or the judge, justice, or a clerk thereof; county clerk; register of deeds; the mayor or the clerk of any corporate city; notary public; justice of the peace. Out of the state and within the United States, by any court of record, or the clerk or the officer holding the seal thereof; notary public; justice of the peace, duly certified to; commissioner for Kansas appointed by the governor of Kansas. Out of the United States, by any consul of the United States in any foreign port or country. A notary public must give the date of the expiration of his commission.

Kentucky.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a county clerk; notary public. Out of the state and within the United States, by a judge, clerk, or deputy clerk, of a court of record; mayor of a city; the secretary of state; commissioner to take acknowledgments of deeds; notary public. Out of the United States, by a minister, consul, or secretary of legation, of the United States; the secretary of foreign affairs; judge of a superior court of the nation where the acknowledgment is taken. The deed of a married woman must be acknowledged, and she must be examined separately and apart.

Louisiana.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a clerk or deputy clerk of a district court, except the parish of Orleans, said clerk being ex officio recorder of mortgages and conveyances; notary public. Out of the state and within the United States, by a notary public; commissioner of Louisiana appointed by the governor of Louisiana; any officer authorized by the laws of the state to take acknowledgments in the state where the

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acknowledgment is taken. In the latter case, the signature and authority of such officer must be properly certified to by a Louisiana commissioner, or by the governor and the secretary of state, under the great seal of the state. Out of the United States, by an ambassador, minister, charge d'affaires, secretary of legation, consul-general, consul, vice-consul, or commercial agent, of the United States; any officialauthorized by the laws thereof to take acknowledgments in the country where the acknowledgment is taken. In the latter case, such acknowledgment must be accompanied by an attestation of one of the American officers just mentioned, that such officer has such authority and that his signature is genuine. The wife must be examined separately and apart, and a full statement of the explanation of her rights must appear in the acknowledgment.

Maine.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a notary public; justice of the peace. Out of the state and within the United State's, by a notary public; commissioner for Maine appointed by the governor of Maine; clerk of a court of record having a seal, which must be affixed. Out of the United States, by a United States minister, or consul; notary public.

Maryland.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a judge of the orphans' court, of the circuit court of any county, of the superior court, of the court of common pleas, or of the city, or circuit, court of Baltimore city; notary public; justice of the peace. If acknowledged before a justice of the peace within the state, but out of the county or city in which the real estate or any part of it lies, the official character of the justice of the peace must be certified to by the clerk of the circuit court of the county, or the superior court of Baltimore city, under the official seal. Out of the state and within the United States, by a judge of any United States court; judge of any court of any state or territory, having a seal; notary public; commissioner for Maryland appointed by the governor of Maryland. Out of the United States, by a minister, consul-general, consul, deputy consul, vice-consul, consular agent, or consular officer, of the United States.

Massachusetts.-Acknowledgments of deeds and other instruments may be taken within the state, by a notary public; justice of the peace; or a special commissioner. Out of the state and within the United States, by a notary public; justice of the peace; magistrate or conmissioner appointed for the purpose by the governor of Massachusetts; any officer of such state, territory, or district, authorized by the laws thereof to take the proof and acknowledgment of deeds. In the latter case, there shall be subjoined or attached to the certificate of proof or acknowledgment, signed by such officer, a certificate of the secretary of state of the state or territory in which such officer resides, under the

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