Ireland

Sampul Depan
Harvard University Press, 2006 - 419 halaman

Paralleling his friend Alexis de Tocqueville's visit to America, Gustave de Beaumont traveled through Ireland in the mid-1830s to observe its people and society. In Ireland, he chronicles the history of the Irish and offers up a national portrait on the eve of the Great Famine. Published to acclaim in France, Ireland remained in print there until 1914. The English edition, translated by William Cooke Taylor and published in 1839, was not reprinted.

In a devastating critique of British policy in Ireland, Beaumont questioned why a government with such enlightened institutions tolerated such oppression. He was scathing in his depiction of the ruinous state of Ireland, noting the desperation of the Catholics, the misery of repeated famines, the unfair landlord system, and the faults of the aristocracy. It was not surprising the Irish were seen as loafers, drunks, and brutes when they had been reduced to living like beasts. Yet Beaumont held out hope that British liberal reforms could heal Ireland's wounds.

This rediscovered masterpiece, in a single volume for the first time, reproduces the nineteenth-century Taylor translation and includes an introduction on Beaumont and his world. This volume also presents Beaumont's impassioned preface to the 1863 French edition in which he portrays the appalling effects of the Great Famine.

A classic of nineteenth-century political and social commentary, Beaumont's singular portrait offers the compelling immediacy of an eyewitness to history.

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LibraryThing Review

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A rediscovered classic! Should be in every Irishmans library, some small errors of fact (the Massacre of 1641), however, they don't detract from the work in any significant degree. Baca ulasan lengkap

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Translators Preface
3
Historical Introduction
5
From 1169 to 1535
6
Section I Political Condition of Ireland in the Twelfth Century
8
Section II The Still Recent Invasion of the Danes
9
Section III Influence of the Court of Rome
10
CHAPTER II
11
Section I Political Condition of the Irish an Obstacle to the Conquest
12
The Office of Public Accuser is Wanting in Ireland
160
Unanimity of the Jury in Ireland
161
How and Why It Has Been Found Necessary to Create in Ireland a Certain Number of Official Functionaries Which Do Not Exist in England
162
SUBSECTION II
163
SUBSECTION III
167
Influence of the Same Principle on the Parish
169
Influence of the Same Principle on an Institution Common to All Public Powers Judicial Authority the Only Supreme Administrative Power
173
Religious Consequences
175

The Relation of the AngloNorman Conquerors to England and of England to Them
13
The Condition Imposed on the Natives by the Conquerors
20
From 1535 to 1690
23
Section I How When England Became Protestant It Must Have Desired That Ireland Should Become So Likewise
24
Section II Of the Causes That Prevented Ireland from Becoming Protestant
25
Section III How England Rendered Ireland ProtestantProtestant ColonisationElizabeth and James I
29
Section IV Protestant ColonisationCharles I
32
Section V Civil WarThe RepublicCromwell
34
Section VI The Restoration of Charles II
43
From 1688 to 1755
49
THE PENAL LAWS
56
Special Character of the Penal Laws
64
Another Special Character of the Penal Laws
65
Legal Persecution Was Not Restrained by the Limits of Law
66
Why Persecutions Continued When Religious Passion Ceased
69
Which of the Penal Laws Were Executed and Which Not
70
The Whiteboys
72
From 1776 to 1829
80
1776EFFECTS OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE ON IRELAND
81
Section I First Reform of the Penal Laws 1778
83
Section II Second Effect of American Independence on Ireland 1778 to 1779 The Irish Volunteers
84
Section III Independence of the Irish Parliament
86
Section IV Legal Consequences of the Declaration of Irish Independence
88
Section V 1782Abolition of Certain Penal Laws Consequences of the Declaration of Parliamentary Independence
93
Section VI Continuation of the Volunteer Movement Convention of 1783
94
Section VII Corruption of the Irish Parliament
95
Section VIII Is a Servile Parliament of Any Use?
100
THE FRENCH REVOLUTION ITS EFFECTS IN IRELAND
103
Section II Other Effects of the French Revolution Abolition of Penal Laws
108
Section III Other Consequences of the French RevolutionReaction
109
Section IV French Invasion of Ireland Insurrection of 1798
110
Consequences of the Insurrection of 1798 The Union
114
Constitutional and Political Effect of the Union
115
CATHOLIC EMANCIPATION IN 1829
116
External Appearance of Ireland Misery of Its Inhabitants
121
A Bad Aristocracy Is the Primary Cause of All the Evils of Ireland The Faults of This Aristocracy Are That It Is English and Protestant
134
Civil Consequences
139
SUBSECTION II
144
Political Consequences
151
THE STATE
153
Hatred of Law by the People
159
III
182
Some Remarks on the North of Ireland
188
General Consequences from What Has Preceded Character of the IrishmanExplanation of Its Faults
191
Summary of the Preceding Chapters Illusions of the Irish Aristocracy
203
How Ireland Aided by the Liberties She Received or Acquired Has Resisted Oppression
209
An Examination of the Causes by Which Ireland at Present a Free Country Tends to Become a Democratic Country
216
Section II OConnell
223
Section III The Catholic Clergy
232
Section IV The Presbyterians
239
Section V The Middle Classes
244
Section VI On the State of Parties in Ireland
251
The Three Principal Remedies That Have Been Proposed for Irish Evils
263
Section I Increase of Industrial Employment
264
Section II Emigration
271
Section III Poor Laws
281
Remedies Proposed by the AuthorThe Civil Political and Religious Privileges of the Aristocracy Must Be Abolished
290
It Would Be an Evil to Substitute a Catholic Aristocracy for the Protestant Aristocracy
297
How and by What Means Aristocracy Should Be Abolished in Ireland
301
Section I
302
Section II
305
SUBSECTION I
312
SUBSECTION II
313
SUBSECTION III
316
SUBSECTION IV
317
Section III
320
SUBSECTION II
327
SUBSECTION III
329
What Will England Do?
335
What Each of the English Parties Could Accomplish for Ireland
341
Section II
343
Section III
344
SUBSECTION I
346
SUBSECTION II
348
SUBSECTION III
350
General Survey of the State of Ireland ConclusionA Glance at the Political and Religious Future of the Country
361
Final Reflections
375
A Report on the Present State of Ireland 18621863
379
Chronology
407
Index
411
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Tentang pengarang (2006)

Andreas Hess is Senior Lecturer in Sociology at University College Dublin.

Tom Garvin is Professor in the Politics Department at University College Dublin.

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