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CORRECTION, INSTRUCTION:

OS.

THE ROD AND THE WORD.
A

TREATISE

ON

AFFLICTIONS:

First conceived by way of

PRIVATE MEDITATIONS:

AFTERWARD DIGESTED INTO CERTAIN SKRMOWJv

And now published

for the Help and Comfort of the Afflicted.

Im« - m »»i»

Br THOMAS CASE, M. A.

Sometime Student of Ch. Ch. Oxon.

Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him. Job xiii. 1 b.
Nihil eo infalicius cui nihil infoelix contigit. Demet apud Sen.

Recommended By The Rev. Dr. MANTON.

A NEW EDITION, corroded and fomewhat abridged.

JLontumt

MINTED IT W. SMITH, KING STBElY, SEVEN DIALS,

AND SOLD BY T. WILLIAMS, STATIONERS'COURT.

1802..

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Some Account of the Author from the Nonconformist's Memorial.

REV. THOMAS CASE, of Christ Ch. Oxford, was the son of Mr. George Case, minister of Boxley, Kent. His first pastoral charge was at Erpingham, in Norfolk, out of which place he was forced by Bp. Wren's severity. He was summoned to the high commission-court, and bailed; but before answer could be given to the articles preferred against him, the court was dissolved by act of parliament. He afterwards settled in London, in the sequestered living of Milk Street, where he was very laborious and faithful in his ministerial work. He it was that first set up the Morning Exercise, which, to the benefit of multitudes, was kept up in the city many years afterwards. He was turned out of this living for refusing the engagement; and was afterwards lecturer at Aldermanbury, and St. Giles's, Cripplegatc. He was imprisoned six months in the Tower for his concern with Mr. Love; from whence he was released with the rest, on their making submission, when most of them were reinstated in their livings. Mr. Casey made the best use he could of his time during his imprisonment, employing himself in the meditations which he afterwards preached and printed under the title of "Correction, Instruction." He was afterwards Rector of St. Giles's in the Fields. In 1660, he was one of the ministers deputed to wait on the King at the Hague; and in 1661, one of the commissioners at the Savoy. When his public ministry was at an end, he ceased not in private to do all the good he could. He died May 30, 1682, aged eighty-four. His funeral sermon was preached by Dr. Jacomb, who gives a full account of his character; the substance of which is: That he was of a quick and warm spirit; but an open plain-hearted man, a hearty lover of God and goodness, and of all good men. He was a scriptural preacher; a great man in prayer, and one who brought home many souls to God. He was the longest survivor of any who composed the Assembly of Divines at Westminster, who continued among the dissenters.

His works were: Sermons before the Lords and Commons—Sermons at Milk Street, on God's waiting to be Gracious—Sermons on the Covenant—And others on particular occasions—Imitation of the Saints, opened in practical Meditations—Mount Pisgah; or a Prospect of Heaven—Correction, Instruction, or a Treatise on Afflictions—The first and last Sermon in the Morn. Exercise at St. Giles's—Sermon on the Sanctification of the Sabbath, in the Supp. to the Morn. Ex. at Cripplegate—Funeral Sermons for Gualter Rosewelr, at Chatham ; for Mrs. Anne Browne, on the Imitation of the Saints, to which. is prefixed a letter to Mr. Case from Mr. William Woodward, dated 1666—For Kinsmel Lucy, Esq.—Mrs. Elizabeth Scott—Darcy Wivell, Esq.—And a Sermon to the Citizens born in Kent.

Noncon. Mem.

Vol I. page 153. New Edit,

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