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From Orange to Boston is considered about 60 leagues. The road thither is across the country. From Boston to New York is reckoned the same distance following the road along the seaside.

New York, situate on the left bank of the Orange River, near its mouth at the sea, is located on a tongue of land forming a peninsula. It is fortified only on the land side. Opposite New York is a large Island (Long Island) very well inhabited and very wealthy. All sorts of vessels of war and Merchantmen anchor between the town and that Island.

Nota. In the whole Country of the River Corlar there are nine Companies of Militia under the Command of Colonel Johnson; eight only remain, that of the Village of the Palatines being no longer in existence, the greater portion having been defeated by M. de Belhetre's detachment. Colonel Johnson assembles these companies when he has news of any expedition which may concern the Mohawk river.

In the latter part of April 1757, on receiving intelligence by the savages that there was a strong detachment ascending the river St. Lawrence and entering Lake Ontario, he assembled these Companies and went to the Village of the Palatines where he was joined by another body of 11 @ 1200 men sent him by the commandant of Orange; this formed in all a force of 2000 men. He entrenched himself at the head of the Palatine Village where he remained in Camp fifteen days, and did not retire until he received intelligence that the French detachment seen on the River St. Lawrence had passed by and taken the route to the Belle Riviere (Ohio.)

This was the detachment of 500 men that had been sent last year to reinforce Belle Riviere, and had left Montreal in the latter days of the month of April.

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THE BOARD OF TRADE AND PLANTATIONS TO LT. GOV. GOLDEN. 13 JULY 1764.

[ Lond. Doc. XXXVII. ]

Monsieur Michel Chartier de Lotbini&re, heretofore an officer in the French King's Service in Canada has presented to us a Memorial desiring the confirmation of two Concessions in America, the one called D'Alainville, four leagues and upwards in front, part upon Lake George and part upon Crown Point River, and extending in depth five leagues to the West, granted by the Marquis de Vaudreuil in 1758; the other situated opposite to Crown Point, having the same extent in Front & extending in depth five leagues to the East, purchased of Monsr Hocquart in 1762, to whom it is alleged to have been granted in 1743 and 1745.

As this Gentleman's case appears to us to require particular consideration, we have wrote to the Governor of Quebec for authentick copies of these grants from the Records, in order that we maybe enabled to make a representation to His Majesty thereupon, and in the meanwhile we think proper to direct that no grants whatever be made under the authority of the Government of NewYork of any part of the lands comprehended within the limits of these Concessions. So we bid you

heartily farewell, and are, Sir

Your very loving friends

Hillsborough Geo. Rice Whitehall, July 13. Bamber Gascoyne

1704 J. Dyson.

EXPLANATIONS

ON MY TWO SF.IGNIORIES OF ALLAINVILLE AND HOCQUART AT THE HEAD OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN AND DETAIL OF MY PROCEEDINGS AS WELL IN LONDON AS IN THIS COUNTRY ON THE SUEJECT, BY M. DE LOTBINIERE. MONTREAL 20 SEPT. 1771.

fFromMSS. in Sec. of State's Off. Alby. ]

The situation of Alainville is designated so clearly in my affidavit annexed in perfect conformity to the Deed granted to me, that it appears useless to add anything thereto.

Though that of Hocquart is indicated in the two Deeds of Concession of which I annex copies, yet to obviate doubts which may arise on the subject, I shall give the details which have been furnished to me of that Seigniory. Its front commences on the south side about 15 or 18 arpens above a tract bordering on the Lake, in front (en face) of Fort Crown-point, from two to three hundred

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