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THE

WESLEYAN-METHODIST

MAGAZINE,

FOR

1848:

BEING A CONTINUATION OF THE

ARMINIAN OR METHODIST MAGAZINE;

FIRST PUBLISHED BY THE

REV. JOHN WESLEY, A.M.

FOURTH SERIES.
VOL. IV.-PART II.

VOLUME LXXI. FROM THE COMMENENTY

LONDON:
PUBLISHED BY JOHN MASON,
WESLEYAN CONFERENCE OFFICE, 14, CITY-ROAD;

AND SOLD AT 66, PATERNOSTER-ROW.

LONDON: PRINTED BY JAMES NICHOLS, HOXTON-SQUARE.

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THE

WESLEYAN-METHODIST MAGAZINE,

JULY, 1848.

BIOGRAPHY

MEMOIR OF THE REV. JOSEPH MARSH:

BY THE REV. JAMES ALLEN, 1st. OBEDIENCE to the apostolic injunction, “Be followers of those who through faith and patience inherit the promises," necessarily involves the consideration of the moral excellencies which their lives displayed, and the admiration of those powerful principles which animated and sustained them in doing and suffering the will of God. We cannot imitate a religious example of which we are ignorant, or which we do not approve. And there is no danger to be apprehended in the study of the characters of departed saints, provided we are careful to trace all their virtues to their source, and to glorify God in them. On the contrary, to overlook the grace which was displayed in them, would be to withhold from God a revenue of glory which we owe to him, and to deprive ourselves of a large amount of instruction and comfort. It is under the influence of these convictions that the following Memoir has been drawn up.

Mr. Marsh was born May 13th, 1787, at Cobridge, near Burslem, in the county of Stafford. His parents were in respectable circumstances, but his father died when Joseph was only three years old. In later life, he began to draw up an account of his religious history. Though incomplete, as far as it goes it deserves to be inserted.

“The earliest period that I can recollect, is marked by the date of my father's death. I was taken to his bed-side to receive his dying counsel: and well do I remember, even now, his pale and emaciated countenance, while he exhorted me to be a good child, and especially to be obedient to my mother, who was about to be left with four children, of whom myself was the youngest. His parting address I never forgot. Indeed my mother, who had previously been brought to the experience of genuine religion, often reminded me of it, and sought to make the impression deep and practical. I had learned to believe in God, who loved, protected, and would reward, the good, and by whom the wicked would most certainly be punished. I often meditated on this, and always thought that I was safe when I was doing right, and acting consistently with those instructions which my mother never failed to give me. Good children, I was persuaded, VOL. IV.-FOURTH SERIES.

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