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Newspapers. Names of the Newspapers published in New Hampshire, Places of Publi

cation, and Number circulated. Name.

Place.

Namber circulated. N. H. Patriot and State Gazette. Concord,

4,000 New Hampshire Journal

3,000 Statesman and Register

2,000 Times and Enquirer

Dover,

1,500
New Hampshire Observer

Portsmouth, 1,400
New Hampshire Sentinel

Keene,

1,200
New Hampshire Post

Haverhill, 1,200
Portsmouth Journal

Portsmouth, 1,000
New Hampshire Gazette

800
Farmer's Cabinet

Amherst,

800 Nashua Gazette

Dunstable,

700
Commercial Advertiser

Portsmouth, 600
Dover Gazette

Dover,

600 New Hampshire Republican

600 Democratic Republican

Haverhill,

400 Farmer's Museum

Keene,

400 New Hampshire Spectator

Newport,

400

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Banks. Statement of the Condition of the several Banks in New Hampshire, on

the 4th of May, 1829.

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Value of Amount of Amount Amount of Amount Amount

Real Es- Debts due. of Specie Bills of oth- of Depos- of Bills in BANKS. tate.

in the er Banks ites. CirculaVaults. on hand.

tion. Dolls. Dolls. Dolls. Dolls. Dolls. Dolls, New Hampshire 16,750 00 191,593 49 7,702 01 3,661 00 14,277 18 58,358 00 N. H. Union

5,883 00 181,763 00 11,057 00 4,642 00 10,137 00 22,748 00 Rockinghnm 1,000 00 125,900 90 3,030 30 3,396 62 14,051 30 12,419 00 Commercial

121,228 70 6,619 54 3,473 23 12,454 92 16,514 00 Piscataqua

1,500 00 239,330 50 5,749 00 12,166 14 37,650 53 61,358 00 Exeter

4,000 00 119,026 20 32,829 22 2,071 00 7,542 19 35,016 00 N. H. Strafford

4,500 00 141,374 42 2,201 93 3,031 00 8,734 24 25,166 00 Dover

6,005 00 174,577 18 7,996 79 2,805 39 3,511 13 30,933 00 4,610 26 99.592 13 5,422 55

794 00 583 00 15,727 00 Concord

2,902 60 112,837 309,990 33 3,798 00 4,861 00 41,859 00 Merrimack County 6,271 65 125,562 40 25,069 12

1 497 00

2,980 82 45,578 0 Farmers'

2,400 00 100,501 60 7,071 78 454 00 4,627 54 39,0:14 Cheshire

2,054 00 166,587 29 10,032 96 1,559 00 4,902 23 74.152 Claremont

1,995 76 89,191 98 11,030 61 5,309 00 5,386 21 35,573 00 Connecticut River 2,444 65 114,598 29 17,726 60 436 00 15,727 15 61,127 QC Grafton

983 62 154,071 35 52,393 10 3,974 50 20,650 61 89,518 25 Pemigewasset 3,446 21 72,432 88 9,424 25 762 00

1,053 62 20, 96 ! Portsmouth Bank. No Returns.

Winnepisiogee

State Prison.

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3,978 46

STATEMENT of Receipts and DISBURSEMENTs in the New Hampshire

State Prison, for the Year ending May 31, 1829.
Receipts.

Disbursements.
lo Stone-shop
$13,066 34 In Stone-shop

$9,325 49 Smith's Shop

Smith's Shop

3,168 14 Cooper's Shop 461 07 Cooper's Shop

329 80 Shoe, Tailor's, & Weay.

Shoe, Tailor's, & Weav.
er's
684 16 er's

278 51 Provisions

533 19 Clothing and Bedding 632 99 Clothing and Bedding 231 87 Provisions

1,189 64
Furniture and Fuel 261 02 Furniture and Fuel 144 25
Received from Visitors 181 78 Expenses for Pay and Sub-
for Interest 41 39 sistence of Overseers and

Watchmen, and Inciden-
Total of Receipts 19, 489 28 tal Expenses

1,894 98 Expenses for Repairs 322 59 for Hospital

62 33

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Total of Disbursements $17,348 72

Militia.

By the returns of the militia, made to the governor on the 12th of June, 1829, the number was as follows. Infantry, Light Infantry, and Grenadiers

24,843 Cavalry

1,601 Artillery

1,592 Ridlenen

864

Total 28,900 The number in the preceding year was 28,415; thus making an increase of 485 for the last year.

VERMONT.

Names of Officers and their Salaries. EXECUTIVE. The governor is chosen annually by the people, and his term of office expires on the second Thursday in October, on which day the session of the Legislature commences. His salary is $1150. The Lieutenant-Governor's pay is $4 a day during the session of the Legislature, and six cents a mile for travel.

JUDICIARY. The Judges of the SUPREME COURT, which is a court for the determination of questions of law, and petitions, and other matters not triable by jury, and has general chancery powers and jurisdiction, are five in number, and are chosen annually by the Legislature. Including an allowance of $125 per annum to each judge, for preparing reports of the decisions of the Supreme Court, to be published by the State, the salaries of the judges are $1175 each.

Richard Skinner, Chief Justice.
Samuel Prentiss,
Titus Hutchinson,

Assistant Justices.
Bates Turner,

Ephraim Paddock, The Legislature appoints annually two assistant judges in each county, who, with one judge of the Supreme Court, compose the County Court. The County Court has original exclusive jurisdiction in cases triable by jury, where the matter or thing in question exceeds the value of one hundred dollars; and in some cases where smaller damages are claimed. The assistant judges of this court have no salaries, and their fees vary probably from $50 to $250 per annum, according to the business done in the respective County Courts. There are thirteen counties.

LEGISLATURE. The Counsellors and Representatives are paid $1,50 a day, and six cents, going and coming, for travel. The Speaker of the House receives $2,50 a day, and the same allowance for travel.

Receipts and Expenditures. The revenue of the State is derived chiefly from direct taxation. The auditor's report for the year ending Sept. 30th, 1829, contains the following results.

RECEIPTS. Balance in the Treasury at last settlement

$8,314 56 Interest on arrearages

644 72 Cash received of the several State's Attorneys *

1,887 34 On Bonds given Commissioners of Deaf and Dumb

105 00 Agents of Foreign Insurance Companies

201 72 Of Clerk of Windsor County, balance of County Court Fees 72 26 On Dividends of the several Banks

1,862 00

* This item is made up chiefly of fines, and forfeited recognisances for the appearance of criminals.

799 23 4,330 28 289 75 215 43

827 30 39,942 46

$ 59,492 05

Pedlars' Licenses
On State Bank Debts
Of Principal of School Fund
Cash received of School Fund in Treasury last year
Cash received Interest on School Fund
On Taxes

Tota!

EXPENDITURES.
Cash paid Debentures of last General Assembly, and the

Salaries of the Judges of the Supreme Court*
Several State's Attorneys †
Supreme Court Orders
Auditor's I do.
Wolf Certificates $
Commissioners of Deaf and Dumb
Superintendent of the State Prison ||
On Special Acts
Electors of President and Vice-President
Salaries of the Secretary of State, Clerk of the House, Secre-

tary of Governor and Council, Auditor of Accounts, En-
grossing Clerk, Governor, and Commissioners of School

Fund
Cash applied to School Fund
Balance in the Treasury

Tota:

$ 14,302 00

1,619 72 15,987 14 3,725 93

260 10 2,400 00 2,205 40 569 08 78 36

2,475 30 8,060 00 7,809 32

$ 59,492 05

Valuation for Tax List. The Grand List, as it is called, for assigning the ratio of taxation, is made as follows. The polls of all males, except students of colleges, and persons properly equipped and doing military duty, between the ages of 21 and 60, are set in the list at $10; improved land, at 6 per cent. upon its value as ascer

* The judges of the Supreme Court, when sitting with the assistant judges of the County Court for County Court business, receive the same fees as the assistant judges; but they account with the treasurer for the money thus received, as part of their salaries.

The Supreme and County Courts, by their clerks, draw orders on the State Treasury for the expenses of conveying convicts to the State Prison, the fees of witnesses, and services and expenditures in those criminal cases where the penalty (if a fine may be imposed) goes to the State, and for the fees of State's attorneys, grand jurors, and clerks of the courts.

The auditor of accounts against the State is empowered to audit, examine, allow, and draw orders for the payment of accounts between the State and persons acting under its authority, in all cases not required to be examined by the courts, or referred to some particular board by special enactment; a sort of appeal from the decision of the auditor may be taken to the General Assembly.

The bounty on each wolf is twenty dollars.

The disbursements of the State Prison exceeded the income received from it, by the sum of $652.08. The superintendent in his report gives the State credit for $168.67 received for admission of visitors,

tained by appraisers ; houses and lots appurtenant at 4 per cent. ; mills, stores, distilleries, &c. at 6 per cent.; oxen at $2; cows and other cattle of three years old, at $1.25; cattle of two years old, at 75 cents; horses and mules of three years old, and of the value of $25 or less, at $1; horses and mules worth more than $25, and less than $75, at $3; horses and mules worth more than $75, at $6; horses and mules of two years old, at $2; do. of one year old, at $1.25; jack-asses at $40; sheep at 10 cents per head; carriages at 6 per cent. upon their appraised value ; brass clocks and timepieces at $3; gold watches at $4; other watches at $1. Money on hand and debts due to (deducting debts due from) persons assessed, at 6 per cent. ; bank and insurance stock (within the State) at 3 per cent. ; attorneys, physicians, and surgeons, mechanics and manufacturers, and merchants and traders, in addition to their property, at such sum as the listers [assessors] think fit, (generally from $10 to $200.) Upon the list so made up, all taxes, school, state, town, district, and those for highways and bridges, are assessed.

Common Schools. An act was passed in 1827 to provide for the support of common schools. The 4th section of the act was repealed in 1828, and in lieu of its provisions it was enacted, that the superintending committees should recommend (instead of direct) suitable class-books to be used in the schools ; that the committee should not be required to visit each school more than twice during the term (generally three or four months), and that teachers may, at the request of any particular district, be licensed, though not possessing the qualifications specified in the first section. Very few town committees made the report prescribed by the act, the last year, and the number of schools or scholars cannot be ascertained, with any tolerable degree of accuracy. The money raised by the general law for the support of schools, at 3 per cent. on the Grand List, would amount to $51,119:42. Perhaps as much more is raised by district taxes, and a considerable sum is paid for the support of private schools.

In 1825 an act was passed, imposing upon all the banks in the State a tax of 6 per cent. upon their annual profits, and appropriating the money thus received, together with that derived from pedlars' licenses, and the remaining property of the old Vermont State Bank, to the creation of a fund for the

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