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Average value of Imports from the Colonies to Great Britain, and of Exports from Great

Britain to the Colonies, now United Siates. Imports to G. Britain from the Colonies.

Exports from G. Brit. to the Colon. £. s. d.

£. Average from 1700 to 1710 265,783 0 10 267,205 3 4 1710 1720

392,653 17 l 365,645 6 111 1720 1730 578,830 16 4

471,342 11 103 1730 1740

670,128 16 0 660,136 11 13 1740 1750

708,943 904 812,647 13 03 1750 1760

802,691 6 10 1,577,419 14 21 1760 1770

1,044,591 17 0 1,763,409 10 1770 1780 743,560 10 10 1,331,206 15

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Value of Imports into England from the United States, and of Exports to the United

States from England, taken from the Custom-house books.
Yearg.
Imports to England.

Exports to U. States.
1785
£ 893,594

£ 2,308,023
1790
1,191,071

3,431,778

6. BRITISH GOVERNORS OF THE COLONIES AT THE BEGINNING OF THE

REVOLUTION.

Nova Scotia, Francis Legge. Rhode Island, Joseph Wanton. Canada, Lieutenant General Sir Guy Connecticut, Jonathan Trumbull. Carleton.

New York, Major General William New Hampshire, John Wentworth. Tryon. Massachusetts, Thomas Hutchinson. New Jersey, William Franklin.

Pennsylvania, John Penn.

South Carolina, Lord William CampDelaware,

bell. Maryland, Sir Robert Eden. Georgia, Sir James Wright. Virginia, Earl of Dunmore. East Florida, Colonel Patrick Tryon. North Carolina, Josiah Martin. West Florida, Peter Chester.

7. DATES OF THE FIRST SETTLEMENT OF THE SEVERAL COLONIES.

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1. EXPENSE OF THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR. As the commerce of the United States was interrupted during the revolution, no revenue was raised from this branch of industry to sustain the great and pressing demands of the nation. Nor, indeed, had Congress power to levy a general tax on commerce, this being the prerogative of the several states. The country itself, moreover, in the midst of an oppressive war, was not in a condition to contribute pecuniary aid to the general cause, and the necessary resort of Congress was to loans and paper money. It is not possible to ascertain with certainty the expenses of the revolutionary war. An estimate was made in 1790, by the Register of the Treasury, and furnished to a committee of Congress. The following general abstract will show the results. The estimated amount of the expenditures

Dolls. 90ths. of 1775 and 1776 is, in specie,

20,064,666 66 1777 .

24,986,646 85 1778

24,289,438 26 1779

10,794,620 65 1780

3,000,000 00 1781

1,942,465 30 1782

3,632,745 85 1783

3,226,583 45 To Nov. 1st, 1784

548,525 63

Forming an amount total of

$92,485,693 15

cates

The foregoing estimates, being confined to actual Treasury payments, are exclusive of the debts of the United States, which were incurred at various periods for the support of the war, and should be taken into a general view of the expense thereof, viz. Army debt, upon commissioners' certifi Dolls. 90ths.

11,080,576 1 For supplies furnished by the citizens of

the several states, and for which ertifi

cates were issued by the commissioners 3,723,625 20 For supplies furnished in the quarter-mas

ter, commissary, hospital, clothing, and
marine departments, exclusive of the
foraging

1,159,170 5 For supplies, on accounts settled at the

Treasury, and for which certificates
were issued by the Register

744,638 49

$16,708,009 75 Note. The loan-office debt formed a part

of the Treasury expenditures.
The foreign expenditures, civil, military,

naval, and contingencies, amount, by
computation, to the sum of

$5,000,000 00 The expenditures of the several states,

from the commencement of the war, to
the establishment of peace, cannot be
stated with any degree of certainty, be-
cause the accounts thereof remain to be
settled. But as the United States have
granted certain sums for the relief of the
several states, to be funded by the
general government, therefore, estimate
the total amount of said assumption, 21,000,000 00

Estimated expense of the war, specie $135,193,703 00

2. EMISSIONS OF CONTINENTAL MONEY. The advances made from the Treasury were principally in a paper medium, which was called Continental Money, and which in a short time depreciated; the specie value of it is given in the foregoing estimate. The advances made at the

Treasury of the United States in continental money, in old and new emissions, are estimated as follows, viz.

Old Emission.

New Emission. Dolls. 90ths.

Dolls. 90ths. In 1776

20,064,666 66 1777

26,426,333 1 1778

66,965,269 34 1779 .

149,703,856 77 1780

82,908,320 47 891,236 80 1781

11,408,095 00 • 1,179,249 00

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$357,476,541 45 $2,070,485 80 By comparing this amount of paper money issued during the revolution, with the above estimate of the total expense in specie dollars, it will be seen that the average depreciation of the whole amount issued was nearly two thirds of its original value.

3. LOANS AND GRANTS OF MONEY IN FRANCE. The following is a sketch of an account of the Loans, subsidies, and grants of money received in France during the revolution. The fractions of dollars are omitted. Five livres and eight sols are reckoned to the dollar.

Livres.

Dollars. 1778. February 6.--Cash received from sundry indi

viduals up to this day, including a loan from
the Farmers General

3,000,000 555,555 Loan by the Court of France for this year 3,000,000 555,555 1779.–Loan for this year

1,000,000 185,185 1780.-Loan

4,000,000 740,740 1781.-Loan

4,000,000 740,7.10 Subsidy from the Court of France

6,000,000 1,111,111 Loan granted by the Court in Holland 10,000,000 1,851,851 1782.-Loan

6,000,000 1,111,111 1783.--Loan

6,000,000 1,111,111

43,000,000

7,962,959

4. PRESIDENTS OF THE OLD CONGRESS.

Names of the Presidents of the Old Congress, States to which they be

longed, and Dates of their Election. Peyton Randolph, Virginia,

September 5, 1774. Henry Middleton,* South Carolina, October 22, 1774.

* Mr. Randolph was prevented from attending Congress by ill health, and Mr. Middleton was chosen to supply his place, five or six days only before the adjournment.

John Hancock,
Henry Laurens,
John Jay,
Samuel Huntington,
Thomas M'Kean,*
John Hanson,
Elias Boudinot,
Thomas Mifflin,
Richard Henry Lee,
Nathaniel Gorham,t
Arthur St. Clair,
Cyrus Griffin,

Massachusetts,
South Carolina,
New York,
Connecticut,
Delaware,
Maryland,
New Jersey,
Pennsylvania,
Virginia,
Massachusetts,
Pennsylvania,
Virginia,

May 19, 1775.
November 1, 1777.
December 10, 1778.
September 28, 1779.
July 10, 1781.
November 5, 1781.
November 4, 1782.
November 3, 1783.
November 30, 1784.
June 6, 1786.
February 2, 1787.
January 22, 1788.

5. Signers OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE.

39

Their names, where and when born, age when they signed the Declaration, dates of their death, and age at that time. Names.

Born.

Age in 1776. Died. Age. John Hancock, Massachusetts,

1737

Oct. 8, 1793 56 Samuel Adams,

Massachusetts,

Sept. 22, 1722 54 Oct. 2, 1803 81 John Adams,

Massachusetts, Oct. 19, 1735 41 July 4, 1826 91 Robert Treat Paine, Massachusetts,

1731 45 May 11, 1814 83 Elbridge Gerry,

Massachusetts,

July 17, 1744 32 Nov. 23, 1814 70 Josiah Bartlett, N. Hampshire,

1729 47 May 19, 1795 66 William Whipple, Maine,

1730 46 Nov. 28, 1785 55 Matthew Thornton, Ireland,

1714 62 June 24, 1803 89 Stephen Hopkins, Rhode Ísland, Mar. 7, 1707 69

July 13, 1785 79 William Ellery, Rhode Island, Dec. 22, 1727 49 Feb. 15, 1820 93 Roger Sherman,

Massachusetts,

Apr. 19, 1721 55 July 23, 1793 72 Samuel Huntington,

Connecticut,

July 2,' 1732 44 Jan. 5, 1796 64 William Williams,

Connecticut,

Apr. 8, 1731 45 Aug. 2, 1811 81 Oliver Wolcott, Connecticut,

1726 50 Dec. 1, 1797 71 William Floyd, Long Island, Dec. 17, 1734 42 Aug. 4, 1821 87 Philip Livingston, New York. Jan. 15, 1716 60 June 12, 1778 62 Francis Lewis, South Wales,

1713 63 Dec. 30, 1803 90 Lewis Morris, New York,

1726 50 Jan. 1798 72 Richard Stockton, New Jersey, Oct. 1, 1730 46 Feb. 28, 1781 51 John Witherspoon,

Scotland, Feb. 5, 1722 54 Nov. 15, 1794 72 Francis Hopkinson, Pennsylvania,

1737

May 8, 1791 54 John Hart, New Jersey,

1780 Abraham Clark,

New Jersey,
Feb. 5, 1726 50

1794 68 Robert Morris, England,

Jan. 1733 43 May 8, 1806 73 Benjamin Rush, Pennsylvania, Dec. 24, 1745 31

Apr. 19, 1812 67 Benjamin Franklin, Massachusetts,

Jan. 17, 1706 70 Apr. 17, 1790 84 John Morton, Delaware,

1724 52

1777 53 George Clymer, Pennsylvania,

1739 37 'Jan. 23, 1813 James Smith, Ireland,

1806 George Taylor, Ireland,

1716

Feb. 23, 1781 65 James Wilson, Scotland,

1742 34 Aug. 28, 1798 56 George Ross, Delaware,

1730 46 July 1779 Cæsar Rodney, Delaware,

1730 46

1783 53 George Read, Maryland,

1734 42

1798 56 Thomas M'Kean, Pennsylvania, Mar. 19, 1734 42 June 24, 1817 83 Samuel Chase, Maryland, Apr. 17, 1741 35 June 19, 1811 70 William Paca, Maryland, Oct. 31, 1740 36

1799 59 Thomas Stone, Maryland,

1740

36 Oct. 5, 1787 44 Charles Carroll, Maryland, Sept. 8, 1737 40

Tow living, 93

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60

When the next Congress met, May 10th, 1775, Peyton Randolph was again chosen president, but he held the chair only eight days, when he was obliged to return home, and John Hancock was chosen to fill the vacancy. * Samuel Johnson, of North Carolina, was previously elected, but declined accepting. | Mr. Gorham was elected “Chairman of Congress” on the 15th of May preceding.

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