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In conclusion, M. Gautier refers to the allusions to the Pentateuch in the New Testament, which have been held by many to be decisively in favour of its Mosaic authorship. He repudiates this conclusion, and refers his readers to articles by M. Berthoud (see our issues for May and June), in which this matter is fully discussed.

SUNDAY IN CHURCH,

THE MORNING LESSONS.

THE

RANGE

OF

HUMAN

SIXTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER the love of Christ, and beyond is still His TRINITY

love. If we could form any right conception

of it, we have much to master; we must THE KNOWN AND UNKNOWN LOVE

comprehend its breadth, its length, its depth, OF CHRIST.

its height. Do we ask how broad is the love That ye may be able . . . . to comprehend of Christ ? We do not know, but certainly what is the breadth, and length, and depth,

broad as the family of man. In Him is and height; and to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge.—Eph. iii. 18, 19.

neither Greek nor Jew, bond nor free. There The glorious excellence of these words almost

is no latitude or longitude which His love

does not cross. Humanity in its widest range induces us to desist from the attempt to treat

counts one degree of the breadth of the love them ; their brilliancy is too great for us to

of Christ. What is the measure of its length ? view them as clearly and as distinctly as we would. Still, we may let them inspire us with

It is long as time, and longer far. From the

beginning we all dwelt in His Divine interest, some thoughts upon the twofold view of the love of Christ as an object which is both with

in His redeeming purpose ; to the end we

shall dwell in His watchful love. Time itself out and within the range of our understanding.

counts one degree in its large duration. What We look at His love to us as that which is

is its depth? It is deep as the spiritual nature I. BEYOND

of man.

No superficial love is His. It is MEASUREMENT AND APPREHENSION. We have ourselves with our boundless capacities for here the thought presented to us of–1. The good and evil that He is caring for. He love of Christ as that which is of immeasure- knows, as we know not, to what awful depths able magnitude in all directions. The sky of sin and sorrow and deathfulness we may go has breadth and length and height, but no down. His love reaches these dark depths (apparent) depth ; the river has length, but and strikes beneath them. What is the Little breadth ; the sea depth and breadth, measure of its height? It is high as the glory but no height; the mountain height and to which He will raise us. Who of us can ibreadth, but no depth. The love of Christ is imagine what it is in His heart to give us in an over-arching sky, broad as the heavens, the far future of the heavenly life? What embracing all lands and peoples in the wide spheres we shall fill, what influence exert, reach of its gentleness and mercy. At the what visions see, what joys inherit? As love same time, it is a far-reaching river running is greater than its gift, we are sure that the through every age and land with its cleansing, loftiest altitudes to which Christ will raise life-giving streams. At the same time, it is a His most faithful servants will only count deep sea, whose depth of Divine wisdom no some degrees of the height of “His implummet of human understanding can sound. measurable grace.” 2. The love of Christ as At the same time, it is a cloud-girdled moun- that which transcends our understanding : it itain whose peaks of moral majesty no human “passeth knowledge." We see clearly that it (foot has climbed. Here is magnitude in all must do so ; for the nature of love depends .directions. Look in this direction, in that on relationship, and this, in His case, is direction, in all directions, and you behold absolutely unique. What orphan can tell the

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full love of childhood, the love of a son to his mother, or of a daughter to her father ? What childless heart can tell the full love of fatherhood or motherhood ? We cannot tell what our feelings will be until we share them. Our Lord's relation to us is all His own. Of Him who redeemed us from sin and woe by His own blood, who dwells in our heart, and is the life of our life, whose authority over us and whose union with us no imagery will explain, we may well say, “Christ only knows the love of Christ.” His love, in all its depth and fulness, is beyond the range of our vision. And yet we may truly regard it as

II. WITHIN THE RANGE OF OUR PRACTICAL APPRECIATION.–We are “ to know" this love, and this we can do by fixing our gaze upon that which we can know, and by realizing that His love is deeper and fuller far. These human affections which so gladden our hearts and brighten our lives are not only invaluable for what they are in themselves, but also because they are the reflection, and (in a sense) the revelation of God's love to us all. We know the protecting love of parentage, the uniting love of friendship, the generous love of philanthropy, and we ascribe all these in the highest conceivable degree to our Lord. We know that no mother ever watched over her sick child with such devotion as that with which Christ is shielding and succouring His “ little ones" in the hour of their trouble and their need ; that no father ever guided and trained and corrected his son with half the goodness and the wisdom with which Christchastens whom He loves, and leads by the right way to the heavenly kingilom. We know that never was human heart bound to another heart in ties so close and tender as is the heart of Christ to His friends who walk with Him and do His will (John xv. 14, 15). We know that the selfsacrificing love with which some have loved their kind is but a faint reflection of the "great love with which He loved us " when He desired, when He resolved, when He descended to redeem us. When we know the grace of our Lord as we think how He that

o rich became for us so poor (2 Cor. viii. 9), as we realize the mind that was in Him who made Himself of no reputation, and humbled Himself unto the death of the cross (Phil. ii. 7, 8), as we see Him bearing the burden of our sin, entering into the dark shadow of its awful penalty, taking that bitter cup into His hand, passing through that mysterious agony, heart-broken upon the cross,- it is then and

thus that we comprehend all that can be comprehended here of the breadth, and length, and depth, and height, we know all that can be known on earth of that knowledge-passing love of our Redeemer. Shall all this Divine love be poured out in vain for us? Shall we be guilty of slighting such grace as this ?

SEVENTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER

TRINITY. SEA AND SOIL; DIVINE PROVIDENCE.

Fear ye not Me? saith the Lord: will ye not tremble at My presence, which have placed the sand for the bound of the sea . that giveth rain, both the foriner and the latter, in its season ; that reserveth unto us the appointed weeks of the harvest. — JER. v. 22, 24. By the mouth of His prophet, Jeremiah, God upbraids His people for their impiety ; but it is worthy of notice that He reproaches them not for their forgetfulness of His miraculous deliverances, but for their heedlessness of His regular, His constant kindness to them. It is not that they are neglecting Him who saved them from the wrath of the Egyptians by the marvels of the Red Sea passage, or who fed them in the wilderness with the manna ; it is that they are failing to honour Him who has always been keeping the sea in its bed, and has for generation after generation made the harvest to ripen in their fields. The text reminds us of

I. Gon's CONSTANT KINDNESS TO US. The prophet gives us illustrations, drawn from the sea and from the soil, of Divine goodness in two forms --- 1. In keeping in check the destructive forces upon the carth (ver. 22). The sea at rest, kept within its bounds, is an object of surpassing beauty; its voice is music of which we never tire ; its surface is the great highway of the nations. But when it breaks its bounds, it causes terrible destruction. If it were to be let loose upon the land it would carry with it utter and overwhelming ruin. But a mighty Hand holds it in check, has placed a bar upon its course ; a. sovereign Voice is ever saying, “Hitherto shalt thou come, but no further" (Job xxxviii. 11). As with the sea, so with the air. The pure air we breathe is life itself; the soft breeze is refreshment and invigoration; the wind aids us in our industries and carries our ships across the water. But the cyclone, the hurricane, is danger, destruction, death. The occasional storm reminds us of the con

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tinuance from week to week of that balance with good things”? Shall not His praise be in the atmospheric forces which the wisdom continually in our mouth? Shall not the and the power of God sustain, and which satisfying and sustaining grain and the nakes possible and practicable our pleasant delicious and refreshing fruit call forth thanks. lives. This also holds with the interior of giving to the kind and generous Giver of all ? the earth. Beneath a thin crust of rock are (3) Service. He who gives us the bread which stored and hidden great central fires. What nourishes our body has placed us under a far if they were loosened ! The earthquake and greater obligation in that He has given us the the volcano are the reminders that there are Bread of Life. Eating of the one, we live a forces beneath our feet and of which we have no lower life for 66 a few more years”; but parcontrol whatever ; but a mightier hand than taking of the other, we live the larger and ours has shut them in, and keeps us in safety higher life for evermore (see John vi. 58). and in peace. These are seen and known Who would not fear Him? Who would not forces ; are there not others unseen and un- serve Him? Unto the God and Father of our known, or just beginning to be recognized, Lord Jesus Christ, unto Him who spared not which our gracious God is holding in check, His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all, and has been constantly controlling through unto that Divine One who gave Himself for all generations ? 2. In putting into exercise us that He might redeem us by His own blood, productive powers (ver. 24). God has been and make us heirs of eternal life--unto Him fulfilling His promise, and neither seedtime belong trust and love and loyal service through nor harvest has failed from the earth. He all our days. has been giving to us seed and soil, sunshine and rain, frost and wind, in their turn and in

EIGHTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER their time ; and year after year, for many

TRINITY. centuries and beneath many skies, the appointed weeks of harvest have arrived. There

OUR LIFE-WORK AND ITS have come droughts and storms : our trust

QUALIFICATIONS. and our patience have been tried ; our Your work of faith, and labour of love, and intellectual resources have been developed, and patience of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ.our character has been disciplined thereby ;

1 Thess. i. 3. adverse material conditions have been

WRITING to his converts at Thessalonica as strengthening and quickening our inanhood; to those who were living a Christian life, the culture of the field has been the culture Paul speaks of their “ work," of their of the race; the method of God's giving has

" labour." He thus 'invites us to regard greatly enhanced the value of His gift. Divine wisdom has accompanied Divine

I. THE LIFE-WORK BEFORE US. What bounty at every step. What then, we ask, are we here to do? What is our life intended has been

to be? What is the most we can make of II. Our HUMAN RESPONSE ? Too often it it? We answer-1. Not to enjoy. has been-1. That which is our reproach. “Not enjoyment and not sorrow Men have taken everything from the God of

Is our destined end or way.” their life, and they have (1) denied His The main purpose of our life is not, as so existence; or (2) questioned His interest in many seem

our own as

9

to think, either sensuous, or His children's well-being; or (3) practically social, or literary gratification. 2. Not to disregarded the operation of His hand, and

Against the judgment, or (at any rendered Hiin no thanks; or (4) contented rate) the habit, of a large proportion of manthemselves with bare formalities from which kind, we affirm that we were not born to all genuine feeling has been left out. But acquire wealth, or fame, or power. That Prophet and Psalmist and Apostle invite us to this is the truth appears when we considera response--2. Which is becoming and accept- (1) That the multitudes of mankind cannot able. (1) Reverence. “Fear ye not Me?” Have possibly attain to such possession ; (2) That we no adoration for this Lord of all power the experience of the few who succeed proves and of all wisdom, who keeps the sea in its that acquisition does not satisfy the heart ; place and who covers the barren soil with a (3) That in what we feel to be our higher and golden harvest? (2) Gratitude. Shall we not truer mood we aspire to something far nobler “bless the Lord,” who "filleth our mouth than enjoyment or possession. 3. Not,

secure.

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full love of childhood, the love of a son to his mother, or of a daughter to her father ? What childless heart can tell the full love of fatherhood or motherhood ? We cannot tell what our feelings will be until we share them. Our Lord's relation to us is all His own. Of Him who redeemed us from sin and woe by His own blood, who dwells in our heart, and is the life of our life, whose authority over us and whose union with us no imagery will explain, we may well say, “Christ only knows the love of Christ.” His love, in all its depth and fulness, is beyond the range of our vision. And yet we may truly regard it as

II. WITHIN THE RANGE OF OUR PRACTICAL APPRECIATION.- We are “ to know" this love, and this we can do by fixing our gaze upon that which we can know, and by realizing that His love is deeper and fuller far. These human affections which so gladden our hearts and brighten our lives are not only invaluable for what they are in themselves, but also because they are the reflection, and (in a sense) the revelation of God's love to us all. We know the protecting love of parentage, the uniting love of friendship, the generous love of philanthropy, and we ascribe all these in the highest conceivable degree to our Lord. We know that no mother ever watched over her sick child with such devotion as that with which Christ is shielding and succouring His “ little ones

"in the hour of their trouble and their need ; that no father ever guided and trained and corrected his son with half the goodness and the wisdom with which Christchastens whom He loves, and leads by the right way to the heavenly kingdom. We know that never was human heart bound to another heart in ties so close and tender as is the heart of Christ to His friends who walk with Him and do His will (John xv. 14, 15). We know that the selfsacrificing love with which some have loved their kind is but a faint reflection of the great love with which He loved us when He desired, when He resolved, when He descended to redeem us. When we know the grace of our Lord as we think how He that was so rich became for us so poor (2 Cor. viii. 9), as we realize the mind that was in Him who made Himself of no reputation, and humbled Himself unto the death of the cross (Phil. ii. 7, 8), as we see Him bearing the burden of our sin, entering into the dark shadow of its awful penalty, taking that bitter cup into His hand, passing through that mysterious agony, heart-broken upon the cross,- it is then and

SEVENTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER

TRINITY. SEA AND SOIL; DIVINE PROVIDENCE.

Fear ye not Me? saith the Lord: will ye not tremble at My presence, which have placed the sand for the bound of the sea .. that giveth rain, both the foriner and the latter, in its season ; that reserveth unto us the appointed weeks of the harvest. — JER. v. 22, 24. By the mouth of His prophet, Jeremiah, God upbraids His people for their impiety ; but it is worthy of notice that He reproaches them not for their forgetfulness of His miraculous deliverances, but for their heedlessness of His regular, His constant kindness to them. It is not that they are neglecting Him who saved them from the wrath of the Egyptians by the marvels of the Red Sea passage, or who fed them in the wilderness with the manna ; it is that they are failing to honour Him who has always been keeping the sea in its bed, and has for generation after generation made the harvest to ripen in their fields. The text. reminds us of

1. Gon's CONSTANT KINDNESS TO us. The prophet gives us illustrations, drawn from the sea and from the soil, of Divine goodvess in two forms -- 1. In keeping in check the destructive forces upon the earth (ver. 22). The sea at rest, kept within its bounds, is an object of surpassing beauty; its voice is music of which we never tire ; its surface is the great highway of the nations. But when it breaks its bounds, it causes terrible destruction. If it were to be let loose upon the land it would carry with it utter and overwhelming ruin. But a mighty Hand holds it in check, has placed a bar upon its course ; a. sovereign Voice is ever saying, “Hitherto. shalt thou come, but no further” (Job xxxviii. 11). As with the sea, so with the air. The pure air we breathe is life itself; the soft breeze is refreshment and invigoration; the wind aids us in our industries and carries our ships across the water. But the cyclone, the hurricane, is danger, destruction, death. The occasional storm reminds us of the con

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hours we look up and see that morning star in hatred. 3. The Lord who is the Divine :13:7 he sky, and we suffer or we labour on source of peace. Jesus Christ gives 512 chose that watch for the morning.” The hope I. OUTWARD PEACE. Peace in the home, ya of triumph, the hope of rest and of reward and in the Church, and in the nation. It is

re-animates our spirit and strengthens our true that the first effect of His teaching is failing hand. But it is hope “in our Lord strife. “I came not to send peace, but a sword,” Jesus Christ." It is because we have-(1) His &c. (Matt. x. 34). But this is neither the word of promise on which to lean ; (2) His proper nor the intended consequence of Chrisnear presence to realize in our hearts ; (3) the tian doctrine. The teaching of Christian offered indwelling of His Spirit to kindle and truth is not the causc but the occasion of sustain us, that we can hope with a conquering strife. The cause of it is found in human assurance. With that the “ patience of hope" prejudices, passions, self-interests in those bears us through and takes to our goal. things which Christ comes to subdue or to

destroy. It is true, also, that there have

been sad dissensions and shameful cruelties, NINETEENTH SUNDAY AFTER and that there is still much bitterness and TRINITY.

uncharitableness between sections of the

Church. But this is not Christian ; it is disTHE LORD OF PEACE HIMSELF.

tinctly and radically unchristian ; it is the The Lord of peace Himself give you peace widest possible departure from the spirit and at all times in all ways.—2 Thess. iii. 16 the will of Christ (see Luke ix. 55; John (R.V.).

xiii. 35). It is just as the spirit of Christ The frequency with which the word “peace" fills our mind and as the will of Christ rules occurs in the Scriptures suggests that the our life that kindness, charity, co-operation thought of it was much to the Hebrew mind.

prevails in the Church, in the home, in the It was, as we know, the common Jewish salu

nation, in the world. Far enough do we yet tation ; and, however conventional that must stand from the realization of our Lord's desire, have become, the fact speaks of the importance but we are moving in the right direction, and attached by the people to the thing itself. many signs are visible, promising a much We account for it thus. The Jews were a more rapid movement in the future toward devout people ; they were well instructed in this most desirable consummation. the home and in “the Church” (see Dent.

II. INWARD PEACE. There are two things vi. 7, xvii. 9-12, xxxi. 26). The “son of the which disturb, if they do not destroy, our law" grew up with a deep sense of God in his

peace of mind. 1. Consciousness of sin. Here soul-of His presence, His power, His right- again the first effect of the teaching of Christ eousness ; he felt that it was everything to is that of agitation and anxiety. For He enjoy His favour, or, if he had lost it, to makes us to know and to feel as, apart from regain it; that it was everything to be at Him, we should not have done, the holiness peace with God. Hence, there was nothing of God, and our own guilt. He teaches us he so much desired for himself or wished for

how great and how sad a thing it is to be his friend and neighbour as peace, and when condemned by God and to be estranged from he met or parted with these he said, “ Peace Him. Then are we troubled with a most real be unta yan."

and profound concern. But the Lord of Jesus Christ recognized and used this fact. peace wounds us thus that He may make us He spake of peace and rest, and offered His whole indeed. He who is the truth is also disciples “rest unto their souls." “ Peace I our peace. He presents Himself to us as our leave with you, My peace I give unto you,”

Divine Saviour in whom to trust and live. He said. He who had been promised as the He invites us to go to Hiin, and find rest in “ Prince of peaco” (Isa. ix. 6) came to be His service (Matt. xi. 28, 29). And gladly “the Lord of peace Himself.” He may claim accepting Him as our Saviour, and resting in that title as-1. The Lord whose heart was the the boundless mercy of God in Him, we receive home of peace; in His spirit was no dis- God's full, immediate forgiveness, are taken up traction, because there was perfect consecration at once into the Divine favour, are included and submission. 2. The Lord who loves among His reconciled and rejoicing children, peace with a strong affection, and hates dis- and are heirs of eternal life. “Being justified cord and bitterness of spirit with a perfect by faith we have peace with God, through

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