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The fibrous labyrinths by juft degrees

Stretch their fwoln cells, replete with future trees,
By time evolv'd, the fpreading branches rife,
Yield their rich fruits, and fhoot into the skies.

O! lovely babe, what luftre fhall adorn
Thy noon of beauty, when fo bright thy morn?
Shine forth advancing with a brighter ray,

And
may no vice o'ercloud thy future day!
With nobler aims inftru&t thy foul to glow,
Than those gay trifles, titles, wealth, and show:
May valour, wisdom, learning crown thy days!
Thofe fools admire---thefe heaven and angels praise ! *

With riches bleft, to heaven those riches lend,
The poor man's guardian, and the good man's friend

ADDITIO N.

To brace the mind to dignity of thought,
To emulate what godlike Tully wrote,
Be this thy early with! The garden breeds,
If unimprov'd, at leaft but gaudy weeds:
And ftubborn youth, by culture unfubdued,
Lies wildly barren, or but gayly rude.
Yet, as fome Phidias gives the marble life,
While Art with Nature holds a dubious ftrife,..
Adorns a rock with graces not its own,
And calls a Venus from the rugged stone;
So culture aids. the human foul to rife,

To fcorn the fordid earth, and mount the skies,
Till by degrees the noble guest refines,
Claims her high birthright, and divinely shines.

Bid virtuous forrow fmile, fcorn'd merit chear,
And o'er affliction pour the generous tear.
Some, wildly liberal, squander, not bestow,
And give unprais'd, because they give for show:
To fanctify thy wealth, on worth employ
Thy gold, and to a blessing turn the toy :
Thus offerings from th' unjust pollute the skies,
The good, turn fmoke into a facrifice.

As when an artist plans a favourite draught,
The structures rife responsive to the thought;
A palace grows beneath his forming hands,
Or worthy of a God a temple stands :
Such is thy rising frame! by heaven defign'd
A temple, worthy of a godlike mind;
Nobly adorn'd, and finish'd to display
A fuller beam of heaven's æthereal ray.

May all thy charms increafe, O lovely boy!
Spare them, ye pains, and age alone destroy !
So fair thou art, that if great Cupid be

A child, the God might boast to look like thee !
When young Iülus' form he deign'd to wear,
Such were his fimiles, and fuch his winning air a
Ev'n Venus might mistake thee for her own,
Did not thy eyes proclaim thee not her fon;
Thence all the lightning of thy mother's flies,
A Cupid, grac'd with Cytherea's eyes!

Yet ah! how short a date the powers decree
To that bright frame of beauties and to thee!

Pafs

Pafs a few days, and all thofe beauties fly
Pass a few years, and thou alas! fhalt die!
Then all thy kindred, all thy friends shall see
With tears, what now thou art, and they must be;
A pale, cold, lifeless lump of earth deplore!
Such fhalt thou be, and kings shall be no more!

But oh! when, ripe for death, fate calls thee hence, Sure lot of every mortal excellence!

When, pregnant as the womb, the teeming earth
Refigns thee quicken'd to thy fecond birth,
Rife, cloath'd with beauties that fhall never die !
A faint on earth! an angel in the sky!

The Forty-third Chapter of Ecclefiafticus.

THE

A PARAPHRAS E.

HE fun that rolls his beamy orb on high,
Pride of the world and glory of the sky,
Illustrious in his course, in bright array

Marches along the heavens, and scatters day
O'er earth, and o'er the main, and through th' ethe-

real way.

He in the morn renews his radiant round,

And warms the fragrant bofom of the ground;

But ere the noon of day, in fiery gleams
He darts the glory of his blazing beams;
Beneath the burnings of his fultry ray,
Earth to her centre pierc'd admits the day;

Huge

Huge vales expand, where rivers roll'd before,
And leffen'd feas contract within their fhore.

O! Power fupreme! O! high above all height!
Thou gav'ft the fun to fhine, and thou art light:
Whether he falls or rifes in the fkies,

He by thy voice is taught to fall or rife;
Swiftly he moves, refulgent in his sphere,
And measures out the day, the month, and year;
He drives the hours along with flower pace,
The minutes rush away impetuous in their race:
He wakes the flowers that fleep within the earth,
And calls the fragrant infants out to birth;
The fragrant infants paint th' enamel'd vales,
And native incenfe loads the balmy gales,
The balmy gales the fragrancy convey
To heaven, and to their God an offering pay.

By thy command the moon, as day-light fades,
Lifts her broad circle in the deepening fhades;
Array'd in glory, and enthron'd in light,
She breaks the folemn terrors of the night;
Sweetly inconftant in her varying flame,
She changes ftill, another, yet the fame!
Now in decrease by flow degrees she shrouds
Her fading luftre in a veil of clouds ;
Now at increase, her gathering beams difplay
A blaze of light, and give a paler day;
Ten thousand stars adorn her glittering train,
Fall when the falls, and rife with her again;

And

And o'er the deferts of the sky unfold
Their burning fpangles of fidereal gold:

Through the wide heavens she moves ferenely bright,
Queen of the gay attendants of the night;

Orb above orb in fweet confufion lies,

And with a bright disorder paints the skies.

The Lord of Nature fram'd the fhowery bow,
Turn'd its gay arch, and bade its colours glow;
Its radiant circle compaffes the skies,

And sweetly the rich tinctures faint, and rise;
It bids the horrors of the ftorm to cease,

Adorns the clouds, and makes the tempeft please.

He, when deep-rolling clouds blot out the day,
And thunderous storms a folemn gloom display ;
Pours down a watery deluge from on high,
And opens all the fluices of the fky;

High o'er the fhores the rushing furge prevails,

Burfts o'er the plain, and roars along the vales:

Dafhing abruptly, dreadful down it comes,

Tumbling through rocks, and tosses, whirls and foams:
Mean time, from every region of the sky,
Red burning bolts in forky vengeance fly;
Dreadfully bright o'er feas and earth they glare,
And bursts of thunder rend th' encumber'd air;
At once the thunders of th' Almighty found,
Heaven lours, defcend the floods, and rocks the ground.

He gives the furious whirlwind wings to fly,
To rend the earth, and wheel along the sky;

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