Count Frontenac and New France Under Louis XIV, Volume 4

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Little, Brown, 1877 - 463 halaman
 

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Halaman 118 - Yonnondio, our women had taken their clubs, our children and old men had carried their bows and arrows into the heart of your camp if our warriors had not disarmed them and kept them back, when your messenger, Ohguesse, came to our castles. It is...
Halaman 233 - Col. Docs., iii. 722. The order for the reduction of the garrisons and the return of the suspected officers was passed at the first session of the council of safety, 20 April. The agents of Massachusetts at London endeavored to justify it. (See Andros Tracts, iii. 34.) The only regular troops in New England were two companies brought by Andros. Most of them were kept at Boston, though a few men and officers were sent to the eastern garrison. These regulars were regarded with great jealousy, and denounced...
Halaman 116 - the warriors of the Five Nations have introduced the English into the lakes which belong to the king my master, and among the tribes who are his children, in order to destroy the trade of his subjects, and seduce these people from the obedience they owe him. I am willing to forget this ; but, should it happen again, I am expressly ordered to declare war against you.
Halaman 315 - God has saved us to-day from the hands of our enemies, but we must take care not to fall into their snares to-night. As for me, I want you to see that I am not afraid. I will take charge of the fort with an old man of eighty and another who never fired a gun ; and you, Pierre Fontaine, with La Bonte and Gachet (our two soldiers) ( will go to the blockhouse with the women and children, because that is the strongest place ; and, if I am taken, don't surrender, even if I am cut to pieces and burned...
Halaman 20 - Your assembling of the inhabitants to take the oath of fidelity, and your division of them into three estates, may have had a good effect for the moment ; but it is well for you to observe that you are always to follow, in the government of Canada, the forms in use here ; and since our kings have long regarded it as good for their service not to convoke the statesgeneral of the kingdom, in order, perhaps, to abolish insensibly this ancient usage, you, on your part, should very rarely, or, to speak...
Halaman 209 - Kinshon, we hear that you mean to send soldiers against the Indians to the eastward; but we advise you, now that we are all united against the French, to fall upon them at once. Strike at the root: when the trunk is cut down, all the branches fall with it. Courage, Corlaer! courage, Kinshon! Go to Quebec in the spring ; take it, and you will have your feet on the necks of the French and all their friends.
Halaman vii - the most remarkable man who ever represented the crown of France in the New World. From strangely unpromising beginnings, he grew with every emergency, and rose equal to every crisis.
Halaman 276 - William Phips, Knight, do hereby, in the name and in the behalf of their most excellent Majesties, William and Mary, King and Queen of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, Defenders of the Faith, and by order of their said Majesties...
Halaman 446 - His attitude towards public enemies was always proud and peremptory, yet his courage was guided by so clear a sagacity that he never was forced to recede from the position he had taken. Towards Indians, he was an admirable compound of sternness and conciliation. Of the immensity of his services to the colony there can be no doubt. He found it, under Denonville, in humiliation and terror; and he left it in honor, and almost in triumph. In spite of Father Goyer, greatness must be denied him; but a...
Halaman 276 - France, does not only sufficiently warrant, but the destruction made by the French and Indians under your command and encouragement, upon the persons and estates of their Majesties...

Tentang pengarang (1877)

Early in his youth, this Boston-born historian was infected with what he called (in language offensive to today's readers) "Injuns on the brain." For the rest of his life, he dedicated himself to writing what he had called at the age of 18 "a history of the American forest." In 1846, following the completion of his studies at Harvard College, he set out in company with a cousin on an expedition from St. Louis over the Oregon Trail to Fort Laramie, Wyoming, a journey that brought him into close contact with the Lakota Indians. Back in Boston, he turned the journal that he had kept on the trail into a series of sketches that were published in the Knickerbocker Magazine and afterwards as a book, The California and Oregon Trail, Being Sketches of Prairie and Rocky Mountain Life (1849), now better known by the abbreviated title of a later revised edition, The Oregon Trail. By this time, Parkman had well underway the historical work that would occupy him during the rest of his life, an account of the French and English in North America, the first installment of which was his History of the Conspiracy of Pontiac and the War of the North American Tribes against the English Colonies, published in 1851.