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OF THE

FIVE INDIAN NATIONS

DepenDING ON THE Province of

NEW-YORK.

BY

CADWALLADER COLDEN.

Reprinted exactly from Bradford's New York edition, (1727.)

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Jntroduction and Notes,

BY

JOHN GILMARY SHEA.

NEW YORK:
T. H. MORRELL, 134 FULTON STREET.

1866. w

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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1866, by

T. H. MORRELL, In the Clerk's office of the District Court of the United States, for the Southern

District of New York.

Press of J. M. Bradstreet & Son.

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IT reflects little credit on New York that

1 none of her sons have endeavored to present to the million readers of the State the life of Cadwallader Colden, a man whose scientific and philosophical mind, insuring him fame in any field of life that he might have selected, was devoted for nearly half a century to the development, interests and government of the colony of New York. But his labors are almost forgotten, his learned works accessible to few, his manuscripts, though safe in the New York Historical Society, accessible to still fewer, and except to antiquaries and collectors, his very existence almost a myth. No public monument, no college or seminary of learning, recalls the memory of one who in electricity and other branches of natural philosophy was the valued associate of Franklin, who corresponded with Linnæus, Gronovius and Bartram on Bota. ny, with eminent physicians in both hemifpheres on the science of medicine, with the

Earl

Earl of Macclesfield on Astronomy and Philosophy, whose reports to government stand out amid the mass of tedious official documents by the freshness, vigor and originality of their views, no less than by their scientific value as treatises.

Cadwallader Colden was the son of the Rev. Alexander Colden, minister of Dunsie, * in Scotland, but was born on the 17th Febru. ary, 1688, in Ireland, where his mother was temporarily on a visit. Designed by his father for his own profession, young Colden was sent to the University of Edinburgh, where he graduated in 1705; but feeling little inclination for the pulpit, he proceeded to London and began the study of medicine, yet without discontinuing the mathematical and scientific studies which had become so attractive to him. In 1710, allured by the flattering accounts of William Penn's colony in America, where mild laws, a benevolent system of polity and a fertile soil seemed to the young adventurer almost to promise a revival of the golden age, he came over to Pennsylvania, already the residence of a maternal aunt, and there practised physic with great reputation for five years.

He then revisited London, where he formed

* From an elegy by Geo. Robson it would seem that he died Minister at Oxname.

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