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PUBLIC MINISTERS AND CONSULS,
AND TOR ALL OTHERS HAVING OFFICIAL OR COMMERCIAL INTERCOURSE WITH FOREIGY NATIOXI.

BY JONATHAN ELLIOT.

“ It would be exceedingly to the discredit of any person, who should be called to take a
"share in the councils of the nation, if he should be found deficient in the great lending
"principles of International Law."— Rent's Commentaries on American Law.

IN TWO VOLUMES.-VOLUME THE SECOND.

WITH NOTES AND INDEXES.

UUashington:
PRINTED BY JONATILAN ELLIOT, JUNIOR,

OR THE PESXSILTAXIA AVEXUE.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year eighteen hundred and thirty. four, by Jonathan Elliot, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court, for the District of Columbia.

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GENERAL INDEX... VOL. II.

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AMERICAN TREATIES WITH THE UNITED STATES:

BRAZIL.
Treaty, or General Convention, of Peace, Commerce and Navigation, between the

United States of America and his Majesty the Emperor of Brazil concluded
and signed at Rio de Janeiro, on the 12th day of December, 1828, on the
part of the United States, by W. Tudor; on the part of Brazil, by Marquez
de Aracaty, and Miguel de Souza Mello e Alvim, .

.66
Negotiators appointed to conclude a treaty. Art. 1. Firm and inviolable peace, &c. 66
Art. 2.' Favors of commerce to be common to both parties.

66
3. Mutual benefits in trade and residence to be equally enjoyed.

4. Each party
may carry its own produce to the republic of the other-equalization of duties
established, and to be the basis of all trade .

67
5. Importations and exportations to be on a reciprocal footing. No partial prohibitions

to be established. 6. Merchant, commanders of ships, and other citizens of
both countries, &c. to manage their own business; to be treated as citizens of the
most favored nation. 7. Citizens of neither of the contracting parties shall be
liable to any embargo, &c. 8. Whenever the citizens of either party seek re-

fuge, in the dominions, &c. of the other, they are to be treated as friends, &c. 68
9. All ships, &c. belonging to the citizens of either party captured by pirates, and
found within the dominions of either, to be delivered up to the owners.

69
10. Assistance and protection to be rendered in case of wrecks, &c. within the domin-

ions of each other. 11. Citizens of each party shall have power to dispose of their
goods and effects within the jurisdiction of the other by sale, testament, or otherwise.
Alien heirs allowed 3 years to dispose of their property. 12. Complete protec-

tection in persons and property in the territories of both nations, legal redress, etc. 69
13. Liberty of conscience and rites of burial secured. 14. Both parties at liberty to

trade with those at enmity with either, ete. Free ships to make free goods. All
persons on board, except those in the actual service of an enemy to be free. . 70
Flag covering the property to be applied to those powers, only, who acknowledge
the principle. 15. Enemy's property, to be protected by a neutral flag, must be
shipped two months before declaration of war, etc. 16. Contraband specified. 71
Definition of blockade. 18. Contraband only, liable to confiscation, 19. In
cases of blockade, vessels to be notified but not detained, etc. Vessels entering be-
fore blockade, may quit unmolested. etc.

72
20. During a visit at sea, armed vessels to remain out of reach of cannon shot,-Neutrals

not to go on board the examining vessel. 21. In case of war, sea-letters, certificates
of cargo, etc. to be furnished, expressing to whom the property belongs,

73
22. Visiting regulations to apply only vessels without convoy,

74
23. Establisheil courts only to try prize causes-Motives of condemnation to be stated, 74
24. The neutral party not to accept a commission to cruise against the other,

74
25. In case of war, six months allowed to those on the coast, and 12 for those in the

interior, to remove effects, etc. 26. No sequestration of money in banks, etc, 74
27. Official intercourse in relation to public ministers, etc., to be on a reciprocal footing, 75
28. Each party permitted 10 bave consuls in each other's ports,

75
29. Commissions to be exhibited before exequatur is obtained, .

75
SO. Consuls exempt from public service-their archives inviolate,

75
31. Consuls may call in the public authorities to aid in securing deserters, who are not

to be detained more than 2 months in prison. 32 Consular convention to be formed, 76
33. The following points agreed 10:—1st. Treaty to be in force 12 yearsPeace, etc.

2ndly. Citizens responsible for infringing this article. 3dly. War not to be
declared, until remonstrance is made, and satisfaction is refused,

77
dotto, Othrow fraties ort to be contravened by this. Patifications within 8 months,

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CENTRAL AMERICA.

General Convention, of Peace, Amity, Commerce, and Navigation, between the

United States of America, and the Federation of the Centre of America.
Negotiated at Washington, on the 5th of December, 1825. Signed on the
part of the United States, by Henry Clay, and on the part of Central America,
by Antonio José Cañas,

41
Art. 1. Firm and inviolable peace, etc. 2. Favors in commerce to be common to both

parties. 3. Mutual benefits in trade and residence to be equally enjoyed 43
4. Each party may carry its own produce to the republic of the oiher-equalization of
duties established, and to be the basis of all trade,

43
5. Importations and exportations to be on a reciprocal footing. No partial prohibitions

to be established. 6. Merchants, commanders of Fships, and other citizens of

both countries, &c. to manage their own business; to be treated as citizens, etc. 45
7. Citizens of neither of the contracting parties shall be liable to any embargo, &c.
8. Whenever the citizens of either party seek refuge in the dominions, etc of the
other, they are to be treated with humanity, &c.,

47
9. All ships, etc. belonging to the citizens of either party, captured by pirates, and
found within the dominions of either, to be delivered up to the owners

47
10. Assistance and protection to be i endered in case of wrecks, etc. within the dominions

of each other. 11. Citizens of each party, shall have power to dispose of their

goods and effects within the jurisdiction of the other, by sale, testament, or otherwise 47
12. Complete protection in persons and property in the territories of both nations, &c. 49
13. Liberty of conscience and rites of burial secured. 14. Both parties at liberty 10
tride with those at enmity with either, &c.

49
Free ships to make liec goods. All persons on board, except those in the actual
service of an enemy to be free. Flag covering the property to be applied to
thuse powers, only, who acknowledge the principle. 15. Enemy's proper.y to
be prolected by a nentral Ang, must be sluipped two months before declaration of

16. Contraband specified .
17. lionis not contraband. Delin. of blockade. 18. Contrabanıl only liable to confis'n 53
19. In cases of blick: d., vessels to be notified but not derainei, &c. Vessels entering

befiire blockadle, may quit unmolested, &c. 23. During a visit at sea, armed
Vessels 10 remain out of reach of cannon shot. Neutrals not to go on board the
examining vessel. 21. In case of war, sea letters, certificates of cargo, &c.

to be furnished, expressing to whom the property belongs.
Visiting regulation to apply only to vessels without convoy. 23. Establishıcd
corris only to try prize carises. Motives of condemnation to be stated. 24. The
neutral party not to accept a commission to cruise against the other. 25. In
case of war, six months allowed to those on the coast, and twelve for those in the
interior to remove effects, &c.

57
26. And no se questation of money in bank or public funds. 27. Official intercourse

in relation 10 public ministers, &c. 10 be on a reciprocal footing. 28. Each
party permitted to have consuls in each others' ports. 29. Commissions to be
exhibited before exequatur is obtained.

59
30. Consuls exempt from public service-their Archives inviolate. 31. Consuls

may call in the public authorities to aid in securing deserters, who are not to be de-

tained more than two months in prison. 32. Consular convention to be formed. 61
13. The following points agreed to: Ist. Treaty to remain in force twelve years.

Peace perpetual. 2nd. Citizens responsible for infringing this article. 3rd.
War not to be declared, until remonstrance is made, and satisfaction is refused. 63
4th. Oiher treaties not to be contravened by this. Ratification within eight months 63

mür, &c.

51

55

92

COLOMBIA.

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* 1. General Convention of Peace, Amity, Navigation and Commerce, between the

United States of America, and the Republic of Colombia, signed at Bogota
on the 3d. of Oct. 1824. Negotiated on the part of the United States by R.
C. Anderson, and Pedro Gual on the part of Colombia.

19
Rules of correspondence between the two nations. Negotiators.
Art. 1. Firm and inviolable peace, &c. 19. Art. 2. Favors of commerce to be com-

mon to both parties, 19. Art. 3. Citizens of the United States at liberty to
frequent all the coasts and countries of the Republic of Colombia, to reside there,&c. 21
Same in relation to citizens of Colombia, 21. Art. 4. Merchants, commanders
of ships, and other citizens of both countries, &c. to manage their own business; to
be treated as citizens of the most favored nation, 21. Art. 5. Citizens of neither of the
contracting parties shall be liable to any embargo,&c. Art.6.Whenever the citizens
either party seek refuge, in the cominions, &c. of the other, they are to be treated
as friends, &c. 23. Art.7.All ships belonging to the citizens of either party captured

by pirates, and found thin the dominions of either, to be delivered up to the owners 23
Art. 9. Assistance and protection to be rendered in case of wrecks, etc. within the dominions

of each other, 23. Art. 9. Citizens of each party shall have power to dispose
of their goods and effects within the jurisdiction of the other, by sale, testament, or
otherwise. Alien leirs allowed 3 years to dispose of their property.

23
Art. 10. Complete protection in persons and property in the territories, of both nations le-

gal redress, etc. 25. Art. 11. Liberty of conscience and rights of burial secured 25
Art. 19. Both parties at liberty to trade with those at enmity with either, etc. Free ships

to make free goods, 25. All persons on boarı, except those in the actual service
of an enemy to be free. Flag covering the property to be applied in those powers,
only, who acknowledge the principle, 27. Art. 13. Enemy's property, to be pro-
tected by a neutral flag, must be shipped Iwo nionths before declaration of war, etc.
Contraband specified, 27. Art. 15. Goods not contraband, 29. Definition of
blockade, 29. Art. 16. Contraband only liable to confiscation

29
Art. 17. In cases of blockade, vessels to be notified but not detained, etc.

29
Vessels entering before blockade, may quit unmolesteel, etc.

31
Art 18. During a visit at sea, armed vessels to remain ont of reach of cannon shot. Neutrals

not lo go on board the examining vessel, 31. In case of war, sea letters, certifi.

eates of cargo, &c. lo be furnished, expressing to whom the property belongs. 31
Art. 20. Visiting regulations to apply only to vessels without convoy.

33
Art. 21. Established courts only to try prize causes. Motives of condemnation to be staled
Art. 2. The neutral party not to accept a commission to cruise against the other. .
An. 23. In case of war, 6 months allowed to those on the coast, and 12 for those in the in.

terior to remove effects, &c. 33. Art. 24. And no sequestration of money in
bank or public funds. 55. Art. 25. Official intercourse in relation to pablic
ministers, &c. to be on a reciprocal footing, 35. Art. 26. Each party permite
ted to have consuls in each others ports, 35. Art. 27. Commissions to be exhi-
bited before exequatur is obtained, 35. Art. 28. Consuls exempt from public
service-their archives inviolate, 35. Art. 29. Consuls may call in the public
authorities to aid in securing deserters, who are not to be detained more than 2 months

in prison, 37. Art. 30. Consular convention to be formed.
Art. 31. The following points agreed to: 1st. Treaty to remain in force twelve years.

Peace perpetual. 37. 20. Citizens responsible for infringing this article
34. War not to be declared, until remonstrance is made, and satisfaction is refused. 39
Atb. Other treaties not to be contravened by this. Ratification within eight months 39

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