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Kentucky.
North Carolina..
South Carolina.

Georgia.

Alabama

Indiana..

Illinois..

Michigan.
Mississippi.

Tennessee.
Louisiana..

Missouri..
Arkansas..

Seats of Government.
Augusta..

States. Maine.

.Montpelier..
Boston....

Providence & Newport. In April

Hartford & New-Haven. 1st Monday in April,
Albany...
Trenton..
Harrisburg.
.Dover..
Annapolis..
Richmond.

Milledgeville..
Tuscaloosa.

.Jackson.
New-Orleans
Nashville..

.Frankfort
Columbus.
Indianapolis.
Springfield.
Jefferson City.
.Detroit..
.Little Rock.

All the States but South Carolina choose their Electors

TIMES OF HOLDING ELECTIONS.

Times of holding Elections.
.2d Monday in September,
.2d Tuesday in March,
.1st Tuesday in September.
.2d Monday in November,

.14.
8.

New-Hampshire
Massachusetts..
Rhode Island..
Connecticut..

Vermont.

New-York.

New-Jersey.

Pennsylvania.
Delaware.

Maryland.

Virginia.
North Carolina.

POPULAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT.
-Electoral Vote.-
Harrison. V. Buren.

.10.

7..

༡:

42.

8.

.30.

3.

.10.

.21.

.15.

15.

.11.

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First Wednesday in November.
First Monday in November.

.Tuesday after 1st Mon. in Nov. Tuesday after 1st Mon. in Nov.
.2d Tuesday in October,
2d Tuesday in October,
.2d Tuesday in November,
1st Wednesday in October,
.3d Thursday in April,
1st Thursday in August,
.2d Monday in October,
1st Monday in October,
..1st Monday in August,
1st Monday in November,
.1st Monday in July,
.1st Thursday in August,
1st Monday in August,
.2d Tuesday in October,
.1st Monday in August,
.1st Monday in August,
.1st Monday in August,
..1st Monday in November,
.1st Monday in October,

First Tues. in Nov. & next day.
First Friday in November.
Second Tuesday in November.
Second Monday in November.
First Monday in November.
Second Thursday in November.
By Legis ature about Dec. 1st.
First Monday in November.
Second Monday in November.
First Monday in November.
First Tuesday in November.
First Tuesday in November.
First Monday in November.
First Friday in November.
First Monday in November.
First Monday in November.
First Monday in November.
First Monday in November.
First Monday in November.
by a Popular Vote.

7

42

8

.30

3

.10

23

.15

Harrison.
46,612

26,158

72,874

31,601

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-1840.

.148,157
58,489

46,376

Van Buren.
46,201

32,761

51,944

25,296

212,527

31,034

143,672

40,264
28,471
65,302

45,537

22,933

19,518

€0,391

11,296

22,972

737,711

4,363
.1,274,203
1,128,303
.145,900......In 1836, Van Buren majority..
PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS FROM EACH STATE.
Electors in 1840. Do. in '44.1 States.
.10
9 South Carolina..
7
6 Georgia..
12 Alabama.

.14

4

4 Mississippi.

8

6 Louisiana.

3,301

18,018

4,874

28,752

43,893

124,782

32,616

33,782

6 Ohio...

36 Kentucky.

7 Tennessee.

26 Indiana..

3 Illinois..

8 Michigan.

17 Missouri.
11 Arkansas..

Do. Presidential Election. First Monday in November. First Monday in November. Second Tuesday in November. Second Monday in November.

31,933

33,991

51,604

36,687

23,626

(Chooses Electors by Legislature.)

24,930

16,612

41,281

14,292

4,072

9,688

35,962

3,383

8,337

1,238

47,476

21,131

16,975

48,289

7,616

29,760

6,048

-1836

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Harrison.
15,239

6,228
42,247

18,749

2,710

20,996

138,543

26,137

87,111

4,733

25,852

23,468

105,405

5

Van Buren.

22,990

20,697

34,474

19,291

.21

.15

.15
9

5

2,964

14,039

166,815

25,592

91,475

4,158

22,268

30,261

96,948

33,025

22,126 20,506

32,790 17,2752

7,332

9,979

Electors in 1840. Do. in '44.

.11
.11

9 10

7

26,120

3,653

10,995

2,400

763,587

.25,876

329563

Total,.

294

275

In 1840 the States in Italics voted for Van Buren, giving him 60 votes; the residue for Harrison, giving him 234 votes.

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