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The annual average rates are subject to a smaller sampling variability than the quarterly rates. The variability for the annual average rate

can be

approximated by taking one-half of the standard error of the rate in table A.

Reliability of the estimates.--Since the quarterly statistics presented in this report are based on a sample, they are subject to sampling variability and may be expected to differ from results that would have been obtained from a complete count in which identical enumeration techniques were employed. The standard error is a measure of sampling variability. The chances are about 68 out of 100 that the difference due to sampling variability between

an estimate and the figure that would have been obtained from

a complete enumeration is less than the standard error. The chances are about 95 out of 100 that the difference is less than twice the standard error and about 99 out of 100 that it is less than 24 times the standard error.

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The standard errors of a few of the more important statistics are shown in table A. To illustrate: the rental vacancy rate for the United States for the quarter is estimated as 7.7 percent As shown in table A, the standard error of this estimate is about 0.4 percent. The chances are, therefore, about 68 out of 100 that a complete enumeration would have yielded an estimate between 7.3 and 8.1 percent.

In addition to sampling variability, the data are subject to errors of response and biases due to nonreporting. Factors affecting accuracy of reporting are the respondent's knowledge of the facts and the enumerator's ability to obtain accurate information an classify unit with respect to such items as condition, seasonal status, number of rooms, rent, sale price, and the like. The 1960 data also are subject to such possible biases and errors of response.

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☆ U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1964 O -749-915

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

PAYMENT OF POSTAGE, $300

(GPO)

DIVISION OF PUBLIC DOCUMENTS

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20402

OFFICIAL BUSINESS

FIRST CLASS MAIL

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Residential housing vacancy rates for the United States were at approximately the same level in the fourth quarter 1964 as the rates in the preceding quarter, according to the results of a sample survey conducted by the Bureau of the Census, U.S. Department of Commerce. In the fourth quarter 1964, vacant rental units comprised 7.5 percent of the total rental inventory, and available vacant units for sale amounted to 1.4 percent of the total homeowner inventory. In the third quarter 1964, the corresponding rates were 7.7 percent and 1.4 percent.

The quality of available vacancies measured by plumbing facilities remained the same in the fourth quarter 1964 as in the previous quarter. Approximately eight-tenths of the vacant rental units had hot running water and private flush toilet and bath; nine-tenths of the vacant for-sale units had these plumbing facilities. Also, the results on number of rooms showed no change in the size of available vacant units. Three-fourths of the rental vacancies had three rooms or more,

and about three-fourths of the vacant homeowner units had five rooms or more.

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Although the supply

of available vacancies for the fourth quarter 1964 was the same as that registered for the fourth quarter of

Table 1.--RENTAL AND HOMEOWNER VACANCY RATES FOR THE UNITED STATES:

1960 TO 1964

Rental vacancy rates

Homeowner vacancy rates

Year

1964...

First Second Third Fourth Annual First Second Third Fourth Annual quarter quarter quarter quarter average quarter quarter quarter quarter average t! +

+ + 7.3 7.4 7.7 7.5 7,5 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.4 7.2 7,5 7.6 7.5 7.5 1.4 1.4

1.6 1.4 1.4 7.7 7.4 7.3 7.4

7.4

1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.3 8.0 8.1 7.9 7.7

7.9 1.2 1.4 1.4 1.2 1.3 7.2 7.3 7.6 7.6 7.4 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2

1.2

1.4

1963. 1962. 1961. 1960.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, John T. Connor, Secretary

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, 20 cents.
Annual subscription (Series Il-111 and H-121, combined), $1.00; foreign mailing, $1.25.

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Units ·lacking facilities" consist of those which lack one or more of the plumbing facilities or which lack exclusive use of these facilities. For example, included as "lacking facilities" would be a downstairs apartment with hot running water but whose occupants would share the bathroom with the occupants of the upstairs apartment.

rural areas which were classified as farm by the 1950 def. inition (the classification depending on the reply to the question "Is this house on a farm or ranch?"). Data for such units are excluded because they would reflect varying amounts for land, business uses,

or for more than one housing unit on the property.

Facilities were considered "inside the structure" if they were located within the housing unit or elsewhere in the structure. Facilities are for exclusive use if only the intended occupants of this one housing unit would use them.

The median sale price is the amount which divides the series into two equal parts, one-hall of the units with prices higher than the median

and

the other hall with prices lower than the median. The median was computed on the basis of more detailed tabulation groups than are shown in the tables and was rounded to the nearest hundred dollars.

A housing unit was considered as having hot running water whether it was available the year round or only part of the time. For example, hot running water may be available only during the heating season or at various times during the week.

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Monthly rent.--The monthly rent is the amount asked for the unit at the time of enumeration, regardless of whether it is to include furniture, heating fuel, electricity, cooking fuel, water, or other services. If the amount of rent were to vary during the year, the rent reported was the monthly amount asked at the time of enumeration. As in the 1960 Census,

the statistics in this report are for all vacant rental units in urban areas and those in rural areas which are located on places of less than 10 acres; thus rural vacancies on places of 10 acres or more are excluded. The statistics in the reports for 1960 or earlier exclude rental vacancies in rural areas which were classified as farm by the 1950 definition (the classification depending on the reply to the question "Is this house on a farm or ranch?"). Data for such units are excluded because of the difficulty of separating the rental for the housing unit from the rental for the land.

Urban-rural residence. --The territory classified urban is the same as that in the 1960 Census. Urban housing mprises all units in (a) places of 2,500 inhabitants or more incorporated as cities, boroughs, villages, and towns (except towns in New England, New York, and Wisconsin); (b) the densely settled urban fringe, whether incorporated or unincorporated, of urbanized areas; (c) towns in New England and townships in New Jersey and Pennsylvania which contain no incorporated municipalities as subdivisions and have either 25,000 inhabitants or more or a population of 2,500 to 25,000 and a density of 1,500 persons or more per square mile; (a) counties in States other than the New England States, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania that have no incorporated municipalities within their boundaries and have a density of 1,500 persons or per square mile; and

(e) unincorporated places of 2,500 inhabitants or more. The remaining units are classified as rural.

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SOURCE AND RELIABILITY OF DATA

Source of data.--The quarterly estimates presented in this report are based on data obtained in connection with the monthly population sample survey of the Bureau of the Census.

The median monthly rent is the rent which divides the series into two equal parts, one-half of the units with rents higher than the median and the other half with rents lower than the median. In the computation of the median, a continuous distribution was assumed; and the limits of the class intervals were assumed to stand at the midpoints of the 1-dollar interval between the end of one of the rent groups and the beginning of the next. For example, the limits of the interval designated $30 to $39 were assumed to be $29.50 and $39.50.

The statistics for the fourth quarter 1964 are averages for the three months, Oct., Nov., and Dec. Beginning with the second quarter 1960, separate living quarters were enumerated according to the 1960 Census housing unit definition. For the preceding periods, living quarters were enumerated according to the 1950 definition of dwelling unit. The result of the change in definition is believed to be too small to affect the vacancy rates.

Inclusion of utilities in rent.--The utilities included in the inquiry were heat, light, cooking fuel, and waver. The statistics reflect whether all or not all of these utilities are provided for in the amount of rent asked at the time of enumeration, not what could be provided for more or less rent. Data on the inclusion of utilities are limited to the same units as those for which rent is reported.

The sample is comprised of 701 counties and independent cities with coverage in each of the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Representation from Alaska and Hawaii was included in the sample, beginning January 1960.

Sale price of l-housing unit structures.--The sale price is the amount asked for the property, including the structure and its land. Statistics on sale price for this report are limited to units in l- housing unit structures, without business, and with only one housing unit included in the property. As in the 1960 Census, the statistics in this report are for all vacant home owner units in urban areas and those in rural areas which are located on places of less than 10 acres; thus rural vacancies on places of 10 acres or more are excluded. The statistics in the reports for 1960 or earlier exclude home owner vacancies in

A total of approximately 40,000 housing units and other living quarters were designated for each month's sample. of this total, about 35,000 were occupied housing units; about 3,500 were vacant housing units; and the remainder were units which, at the time of enumeration, had been converted to commercial use, had been demolished, etc., or were not living quarters within the scope of the survey. Detailed information was obtained for each vacant unit in the sample, beginning with the second quarter 1955.

The data for 1960 are based on the returns of the 1960 Census of Housing and represent the results of a complete enumeration.

The annual average rates are subject to a smaller sampling variability than the quarterly rates. The variability for the annual average rate can be approximated by taking one-half of the standard error of the rate in table A.

Reliability of the estimates.--Since the quarterly statistics presented in this report are based on a sample, they are subject to sampling variability and may be expected to differ from results that would have been obtained from a complete count in which identical enumeration techniques were employed. The standard error is a measure of sampling variability. The chances are bout 68 out of 100 that the difference due to sampling variability between an estimate and the figure that would have been obtained from a complete enumeration is less than the standard error. The chances are about 95 out of 100 that the difference is less than twice the standard error and about 99 out of 100 that it is less than 25 times the standard error.

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0.1 0.2 0.3 0,3

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